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Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

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The Washington National Cathedral hosted a public vaccination event in March 2021 to help demonstrate trust by faith leaders of all denominations in the COVID-19 vaccines. Alex Wong/Getty Images

For some people, religious leaders might be most effective at communicating the importance of COVID-19 vaccination

Two political scientists in their study in South Dakota found people trusted medical professionals the least when it came to public health messages.
While the vast majority of primary care providers have higher confidence in vaccines than the general public, some do not. Evgeniy Shkolenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The 1 in 10 U.S. doctors with reservations about vaccines could be undermining the fight against COVID-19

Many COVID-19 vaccination campaigns encourage doctors to serve as a trusted source of vaccine information. But certain vaccine-hesitant providers may stymie these efforts.
Reason is not the only factor that guides vaccine decisions. Understanding human decision-making is the first step in changing behaviour. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Vaccine hesitancy: Why ‘doing your own research’ doesn’t work, but reason alone won’t change minds

Vaccine hesitancy is often met with one of two responses: Ridicule, or factual information. Both assume a failure of reason, but human behaviour is more complex than reason, so both responses fail.
Health-care workers watch from a window as demonstrators gather outside Toronto General Hospital in September 2021 to protest against COVID-19 vaccines, mandates and restrictions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Politicizing COVID-19 vaccination efforts has fuelled vaccine hesitancy

The antagonism driven by political interference in COVID-19 vaccination is fuelling hesitancy. Mass vaccination campaigns require public buy-in via trusted health-care providers and community leaders.
Researchers sought to understand how thinking about COVID-19 vaccine availability along different timelines might influence a person’s vaccine decisions. (Shutterstock)

‘Never’ or just ‘not yet?’ How timing affects COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

Vaccine hesitancy may be a waiting game. Even those who said they would never get the COVID-19 vaccine if it were available immediately became more likely to do so when it was available in the future.
We interact with nanoparticles in multiple ways every day. The nanoparticles in this illustration are delivering drugs to cells. (Shutterstock)

The nanoparticles in mRNA vaccines are nothing to fear: We interact with many useful, tiny particles every day

Some vaccine hesitancy is based on a fear of the nanoparticles used in mRNA vaccines. But humans have been interacting with nanoparticles for millennia, and we use nanotechnology-based devices every day.
With the holiday season approaching, people wait to receive a COVID-19 vaccination in Montréal as the pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Answers from COVID experts: How do you talk to family members who aren’t vaccinated? How can the vaccines be safe if they were developed so quickly? Is natural immunity better than being vaccinated?

A panel of experts answer questions about vaccines, omicron and other COVID-related issues in a discussion with The Conversation.
Health care providers are just one trusted source of information for parents on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Cavan Images/Cavan via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for children: How parents are influenced by misinformation, and how they can counter it

Pediatricians and other health care providers can take some concrete steps toward building trust and counteracting anti-vaccination misinformation.

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