Articles on Violence against women

Displaying 1 - 20 of 132 articles

Women protest chronically high rates of femicide – the killing of women – in Mexico City in November 2019. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

Mexico’s other epidemic: Murdered women

In Mexico City, feminist groups spray-painted the names of Mexico's murdered women on the pavement of the Zócalo, the capital city's enormous main square, during the International Women's Day March.
The female form is often used to depict themes of freedom and justice – and satirists think it’s useful to extend the metaphor to rape. But that’s a problem. EPA/Joédson Alves

Political satire has a rape problem

It's dehumanising when cartoonists use images of sexual violence to make broad-brush comments about society.
The new sign commemorating the anniversary of the 1989 École Polytechnique shooting now recognizes that it was an attack against women and feminists. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

The Montréal Massacre is finally recognized as an anti-feminist attack

Thirty years after the Montreal Massacre that killed 14 women, new threats such as the incel movement pose dangers to the feminist movement.
Canadian statistics reveal that a woman is killed every five days by an intimate partner or a family member. This picture represents women killed from Jan. 1 to Nov 30, 2019. Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability

Remembering everyday violence against women and girls on Dec. 6

While we remember the women murdered 30 years ago, we shouldn't ignore those short, terse paragraphs in the news that describe the everyday, routine violence inflicted upon women.
A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Montréal Massacre, 30 years later: My experience as a woman in engineering

Engineering is in a better place than in 1989. More women are studying the field, and academic administrators and managers want to hire female engineers. But more work is still needed.

Top contributors

More