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Articles on voting patterns

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U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a Veterans Day wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., on Nov. 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Why did Donald Trump do better than expected in the U.S. election?

A look at the forces at work in the 2020 presidential election in which Donald Trump defied pollsters again even though he lost to Joe Biden.
President-elect Joe Biden stands on stage after making his victory speech on Nov. 7, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Joe Biden’s win shows the clout of senior citizens in America

President-elect Joe Biden has successfully enticed the young into politics. As he approaches his 78th birthday, will he also serve their interests?
Women’s perceptions of ‘gender linked fate’ were contingent on two dimensions: their race and their marital status. Shutterstock

Why white married women are more likely to vote for conservative parties

Women are swinging elections in the US and Australia in ways analysts have struggled to predict. Two recent studies can help explain.
Rather than encouraging people to become better citizens, rewards and fines can actually reduce peoples’ natural tendencies to do the right thing by others. from www.shutterstock.com

Voter turnout at New Zealand local elections keeps falling, but paying people to vote could backfire

The idea that a small payment could motivate more people to vote resurfaces regularly, but this ignores evidence that monetary incentives to induce pro-social behaviour can be counterproductive.
Occasional voters don’t respond well to guilt trips when organizations try to encourage them to cast ballots. Research suggests other methods are more successful. Unsplash

How to encourage the occasional voter to cast a ballot

Encouraging people to vote involves changing the discourse. Guilt trips are ineffective.
A voter drops off her election ballot at a drop box in Oregon. Richard Clement/REUTERS

Why Asian Americans don’t vote Republican

Asian Americans are the wealthiest, best-educated and fastest-growing segment of voters in the US. They are also increasingly voting Democratic.

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