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Articles on Water policy

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India’s civil society has opposed engineering-based water management such as large dams, river linking and canal irrigation, for environmental and social reasons, but often ideological reasons. www.unsplash.com/@akshat_agrawal11

How India’s civil society can shape the country’s water policy

India's civil society, which for the past 30 years has been critical of India's water policies, now has the opportunity to drive the policy recommendations for water management.
The enthusiasm for recycling water that Australians had at the height of the drought little more than a decade ago has waned. Shaney Balcombe/AAP

When water is scarce, we can’t afford to neglect the alternatives to desalination

Cities relied entirely on conserving and recycling water to get through the last big drought. We now have desalination plants, but getting the most out of our water reserves still makes sense.
The more the market is willing to pay, the harder it is to regulate water use. Shutterstock.com

What happens to small towns whose water becomes big business for bottled brands?

Residents of a small Victorian town realised that delicious water can be a curse as well as a blessing, when they lost a legal battle to stop a local farmer shipping groundwater to a nearby bottling plant.
Despite billions spent on trying to save water in the Murray Darling Basin, results have been disappointing. John Williams

The Murray Darling Basin Plan is not delivering – there’s no more time to waste

A dozen leading researchers have issued an urgent call to action for the Murray-Darling Basin, arguing that the billions spent on water-efficient irrigation have done little for the rivers' health.
The Thomson Dam, Melbourne’s largest water storage, dropped to only 16% of capacity in the last big drought. Melbourne Water/flickr

This is what Australia’s growing cities need to do to avoid running dry

Australian cities have turned to some very costly solutions when water is scarce. But as the world's second-highest users of water per person, more efficient use and recycling are key.
Presidents Issoufou, Yayi, Deby and Buhari at a meeting of the Lake Chad Basin Commission, the body in charge of the lake replenishment project REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde

The attempt to replenish Lake Chad’s water may fail again. Here’s why

The transnational project conceived 30 years ago to replenish the drying waters of Lake Chad finally seems poised to take off. But first, internal politics within member states must be overcome.

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