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Articles on Wildlife trade

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Disturbing the habitats of horseshoe bats, like these in Borneo, increases the risk of virus spillover. Mike Prince/Flickr

Preventing future pandemics starts with recognizing links between human and animal health

How can nations prevent more pandemics like COVID-19? One priority is reducing the risk of diseases’ jumping from animals to humans. And that means understanding how human actions fuel that risk.
Communities living near protected areas such as Nyika National Park often depend on agriculture and natural resources to survive. Julia van Velden

Malawi study shows how dependency on bushmeat hunting can be reduced

Enforcement at protected areas is key way to prevent bushmeat poaching, but it’s also important to recognise the contribution bushmeat makes to livelihoods, incomes and food security.
Pangolins have been found with covonaviruses that are genetically similar to the one afflicting humans today. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

Yellow fever, malaria and Ebola all spilled over from animals to humans at the edges of tropical forests. The new coronavirus is the latest zoonosis.
Protesters hold signs outside women’s fashion designer Eudon Choi in London during Fashion Week in 2017. Elena Rostenova/www.shutterstock.com

Python skin jackets and elephant leather boots: How wealthy Western nations help drive the global wildlife trade

The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on global commerce in wildlife. But many accounts focus on demand from Asia, ignoring the role of US and European consumers.
Burning confiscated elephant ivory and animal horns in Myanmar’s first public display of action against the illegal wildlife trade, Oct. 4, 2018. Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

Can Asia end its uncontrolled consumption of wildlife? Here’s how North America did it a century ago

In the 1800s, Americans hunted many wild species near or into extinction. Then in the early 1900s, the US shifted from uncontrolled consumption of wildlife to conservation. Could Asia follow suit?
Wildlife markets, where live animals are sold and slaughtered, are an integral part of the global wildlife trade. GettyImages

What is the wildlife trade? And what are the answers to managing it?

Ecological systems are at breaking point and a global economic collapse is under way. It’s time to invest in risk mitigation to prevent another COVID-type disaster.
Government officers seize civets in a wildlife market in Guangzhou, China to prevent the spread of SARS in 2004. Dustin Shum/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

The new coronavirus emerged from the global wildlife trade – and may be devastating enough to end it

Wild animals and animal parts are bought and sold worldwide, often illegally. This multibillion-dollar industry is pushing species to extinction, fueling crime and spreading disease.

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