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Articles on Wolves

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More animals, including wolves, are shifting their patterns to adjust to human activity. (Thomas Bonometti/Unsplash)

Wolf culls change hunting habits and help caribou conservation

Woodland caribou populations are on the decline because human activity changes their habitat and exposes them to predation by wolves. But changing wolves’ hunting habits may protect the caribou.
Fossil of the skull and. mandibles of the new species. Alberto Valenciano

Fossil find introduces a new ancestor to the jackal family tree

Jackals appeared and established themselves in Africa in at least the last five million years. These animals have evolved and adapted to the changing environment, allowing them to survive.
North America during the late Pleistocene: a pack of dire wolves (red hair) are feeding bison while a pair of grey wolves approach in the hopes of scavenging. Mauricio Antón

Dire wolves went extinct 13,000 years ago but thanks to new genetic analysis their true story can now be told

Our research shows dire wolves lived in the tropics not the Arctic, and were not especially close relatives of the grey wolf.
Won’t you be my neighbor? Dennis Fast/ VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Will Colorado bring back wolves? It’s up to voters

For the first time in the US, a ballot measure will ask voters whether to restore wolves to a place where they’ve been eradicated. Coloradans have strong views on both sides.
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Vegan dogs: should canines go meat free?

As omnivores, dogs should be able to adapt well and manage on well prepared commercially available vegetarian diets as long as the essential nutrients they would normally get from meat are present.
Dingoes are usually solitary, but can forage in groups near human settlements where food is abundant. Klaasmer/Wikimedia Commons

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

An attack on a WA mine worker has highlighted the danger of wild dingoes, particularly when attracted by humans’ food - one of the factors that can make an attack by wild predators much more likely.
Black tip sharks swim with tropical fish in a lagoon in French Polynesia. (Shutterstock)

Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won’t solve conflicts

When humans have conflicts with wildlife, the first reaction is often to cull them. But there’s little evidence to show that it works, and removing predators can even backfire and make things worse.

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