Articles on Women's suffrage

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A suffrage parade. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division

When lesbians led the women’s suffrage movement

In 1911, lesbians led the nation’s largest feminist organization. They promoted a diverse and inclusive women’s rights movement.
Catherine Hay Thomson went undercover as an assistant nurse for her series on conditions at Melbourne Hospital. A. J. Campbell Collection/National Library of Australia

Hidden women of history: Catherine Hay Thomson, the Australian undercover journalist who went inside asylums and hospitals

A passionate crusader for the rights of women and children, Catherine Hay Thomson went undercover to investigate their treatment in public institutions and testified before a Royal Commission.
After winning the right to vote in 1893, New Zealand’s suffragists kept up the battle, but the unity found in rallying around the major cause had receded. Jim Henderson/Wikimedia Commons

NZ was first to grant women the vote in 1893, but then took 26 years to let them stand for parliament

New Zealand was the first nation to grant women the vote in 1893, but during the pre-war years enduring prejudice against women in politics outweighed any support for women to stand for parliament
Female members of Congress wore white in a nod to suffragists during the State of the Union. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

How white became the color of suffrage

Being the media-savvy women that they were, suffragists realized they needed to come up with a meaningful, recognizable brand.
Independent Kerryn Phelps’s roll call of “decency, integrity, humanity” harked back to the women who fought hard for female enfranchisement in the early 20th century. AAP/Chris Pavlich

More than a century on, the battle fought by Australia’s suffragists is yet to be won

The early suffragists would be rolling in their graves to know that women joining the ranks of parliamentarians barely changed their male colleagues’ outlook and demeanour at all.
A memorial by sculptor Margriet Windhausen depicts the life-size figures of Kate Sheppard and other leaders of the Aotearoa New Zealand suffrage movement. Bernard Spragg/Wikimedia Commons

Why New Zealand was the first country where women won the right to vote

125 years ago today women in New Zealand were the first to win the right to vote. Why did this global first happen in a small and isolated corner of the South Pacific?
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Why feminism still matters to young people

It's been 100 years since women over 30 won the right to vote in Britain. But that didn't solve gender injustice – and young people today need feminism more than ever.
The Blyth Spartans team of 1917, including Bella Reay (front row, centre) who scored a hat-trick in the Munitionettes Cup. Yvonne Crawford

The Great War’s hidden stories reveal heroism and tragedy in equal measure

A top class female footballer and tragic young soldier who was shot for 'desertion' despite fighting in some of WW1's bloodiest battle fields are two hidden stories of The Great War.

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