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Articles on Work-related stress

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Intensive care nurse Kathryn Ivey’s Tweet illustrates the impact of the pandemic on health-care workers. Used with permission. @kathryniveyy/Twitter

High rates of COVID-19 burnout could lead to shortage of health-care workers

Rates of burnout have increased alarmingly among health-care workers during the pandemic. Unless the system provides more support to its already depleted workforce, staff shortages may get worse.
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Our uni teachers were already among the world’s most stressed. COVID and student feedback have just made things worse

Workplace stress among academics has long been higher in Australia and New Zealand than overseas, and research suggests the flow-on impacts on students could fuel a vicious cycle of negative feedback.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta activated its emergency operations centre in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Centers for Disease Control/Unsplash)

Tackling burnout: How to deal with stress and safety in the workplace

Burnout as the result of workplace stress has big implications for employers. Occupational health and safety standards require employers to protect both the physical and mental health of workers.
For narcissistic managers, it’s all about them, not their employees. Anna Koldunova/Shutterstock

Can narcissistic managers fake that they care?

Narcissism is relatively common among managers and can damage their relationships with employees. Yet some narcissists can enourage trust despite their shortcomings. So how can they be detected?
Could the Chateau Laurier be your new office? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Stressed out working from home? Consider a hotel day pass

People working from home, especially parents, are stressed out during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hotels, meantime, have taken a huge economic hit. Here’s why hotels should market to remote workers.
Bangladeshi child labourers work at a balloon factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Consumers must demand products made under favourable working conditions. (AP Photo/A.M Ahad)

The end of dangerous working conditions starts with informed consumers

The food we eat and the products we use should not contribute to human misery. While companies hold some blame, so do consumers who avoid dealing with the consequences of their purchasing decisions.

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