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Articles on Workplace harassment

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A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Montréal Massacre, 30 years later: My experience as a woman in engineering

Engineering is in a better place than in 1989. More women are studying the field, and academic administrators and managers want to hire female engineers. But more work is still needed.
Not all instances of sexism are tangible or easy to explain, but they can have similar impacts on women’s mental health as overt sexism. Zivica Kerkez

Still serving guests while your male relatives relax? Everyday sexism like this hurts women’s mental health

It can happen at work, on the street or at home – even by the people who love us. Everyday sexism might be hard to pin down, but it's pervasive and creates an additional layer of stress for women.
Young people working in the hospitality industry – covering restaurants, cafes, bars and pubs – are particularly prone to exploitative practices, according to the Fair Work Ombudsman. Shutterstock

Welcome to your first job: expect to be underpaid, bullied, harassed or exploited in some way

Three-quarters of teenagers in our survey experienced exploitation, bullying, harassment or some other form of abuse in their first job.

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