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Articles on Workplace stress

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Intensive care nurse Kathryn Ivey’s Tweet illustrates the impact of the pandemic on health-care workers. Used with permission. @kathryniveyy/Twitter

High rates of COVID-19 burnout could lead to shortage of health-care workers

Rates of burnout have increased alarmingly among health-care workers during the pandemic. Unless the system provides more support to its already depleted workforce, staff shortages may get worse.
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Our uni teachers were already among the world’s most stressed. COVID and student feedback have just made things worse

Workplace stress among academics has long been higher in Australia and New Zealand than overseas, and research suggests the flow-on impacts on students could fuel a vicious cycle of negative feedback.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta activated its emergency operations centre in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Centers for Disease Control/Unsplash)

Tackling burnout: How to deal with stress and safety in the workplace

Burnout as the result of workplace stress has big implications for employers. Occupational health and safety standards require employers to protect both the physical and mental health of workers.
For narcissistic managers, it’s all about them, not their employees. Anna Koldunova/Shutterstock

Can narcissistic managers fake that they care?

Narcissism is relatively common among managers and can damage their relationships with employees. Yet some narcissists can enourage trust despite their shortcomings. So how can they be detected?
Bangladeshi child labourers work at a balloon factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Consumers must demand products made under favourable working conditions. (AP Photo/A.M Ahad)

The end of dangerous working conditions starts with informed consumers

The food we eat and the products we use should not contribute to human misery. While companies hold some blame, so do consumers who avoid dealing with the consequences of their purchasing decisions.
In today’s digital age, we’re losing the ability to switch off from our work. From shutterstock.com

Are you burnt out at work? Ask yourself these 4 questions

Has anyone close to you asked you to cut down on your work? Do you feel guilty that you’re not spending enough time with your friends, family or even yourself? It might be time for change.
The daily fluctuations in the stock market can have a serious emotional impact on people watching their stock portfolios, when the less stressful strategy would be to pay attention to long-term trends. (Shutterstock)

Managing the highs and lows of data overload

Today it’s estimated that we take in about five times as much information as we did 25 years ago, and that we process as much data in a day as our 15th century ancestors would have in their lifetime.
A park, in this case Hyde Park in Sydney, is one of the easiest and most accessible ways to engage with nature in the city. Lucy Taylor

Reducing stress at work is a walk in the park

Nature is dispersed through our cities, even if we don’t notice it. And there’s abundant evidence that engaging with nature, even in urban settings, is good for us.

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