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Articles on Military coup

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A Russian armoured personnel carrier on the streets of Bangui. Photo by Camille Laffont/AFP via Getty Images

What it will take to end civil war in the Central African Republic

Only an emphasis on civilian aspects of rule, such as education and health, can shield the state from rebellions that challenge state power in the future.
Anti-coup protesters flash the three-fingered salute during a rally in downtown Yangon, Myanmar on Feb. 19, 2021. (AP Photo)

The exclusion of women in Myanmar politics helped fuel the military coup

Despite having a woman leader, women are largely excluded from key positions of influence and leadership in Myanmar — a situation that helped the country’s military succeed in its recent coup.
A protester holds up a placard with an image of deposed Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi during an anti-coup rally in Mandalay, Myanmar, on Feb. 15, 2021. (AP Photo)

Internet blackouts in Myanmar allow the military to retain control

Internet shutdowns and social media bans in Myanmar have helped the military retain control after the Feb. 1 coup. Here’s why ISPs should develop clear policies around forced internet shutdowns.
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden review the troops from the east steps of the U.S. Capitol during the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington. (David Tulis/Pool Photo via AP)

Biden’s peaceful inauguration doesn’t end America’s longtime coup addiction

From a global perspective, there was nothing unique about the recent raid on the U.S. Capitol. Both Republican and Democratic administrations have backed military coups around the world for decades.
The late Robert Mugabe, a few months before he was removed from office in a coup. Aaron Ufumeli/EPA

From Zimbabwe to Bolivia: what makes a military coup?

When the military intervened against Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe in 2017, it wasn’t widely called a military coup. New research shows that’s exactly what it was.
The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, who have tracked over 100 children stolen by Argentina’s 1976-1983 military junta, were among the human rights activists that pushed the US to declassify intelligence documents related to the dictatorship. Reuters/Marcos Brindicci

Truth, justice and declassification: Secret archives show US helped Argentine military wage ‘dirty war’ that killed 30,000

Traveling death squads. Sadistic torture techniques. Stolen babies. The US helped it all happen by aiding Argentina’s military regime in the 1970s, according to newly declassified documents.

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