Butterfly wings, like those of the monarch butterfly, have inspired scientists to create “structural colours”. tea maeklong/Shutterstock

Explainer: how scientists invent new colours

Scientists continue to invent new colours for new applications thanks to nanoscale structures.
Detail from Katsushika Hokusai, The great wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa oki namiura), (1830–34), from the Thirty-six views of Mt Fuji (Fugaku-sanjū-rokkei) National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Felton Bequest, 1909 (426-2)

Friday essay: from the Great Wave to Starry Night, how a blue pigment changed the world

Hokusai's Great Wave is the enduring image of Japanese art. Less well known is the story of its primary pigment - Prussian blue - which was created in a lab accident in Berlin and sparked 'blue fever' in Europe.
Melbourne Lord Mayor Robert Doyle explains the revised Queen Victoria Market redevelopment, flanked by Planning Minister Richard Wynne and Premier Daniel Andrews. Joe Castro/AAP

Social mix in housing? One size doesn’t fit all, as new projects show

Mixing public and private housing in urban renewal projects can be a contentious business. But public good and optimal use of public resources, not developer interests, should guide such decisions.
Inflation has been doggedly low, so it’s not clear that the 2.5% expectation for inflation is going to turn out to be right. Dan Peled/AAP

Vital Signs: the RBA’s still longing for Goldilocks growth

This week's strong growth in full-time employment shows a robust labour market. This only deepens the puzzle of why inflation is so low at the same time.
The Australian drugs regulator is overhauling the health claims made by suppliers of complementary medicines, including homeopathic therapies. And some curious options are up for discussion. from www.shutterstock.com

New complementary medicine health claims lack evidence, so why are they even on the table?

Would you trust a complementary medicine described as "vermifuge", "vulnerary" or "emmenagogue"? That's what new labelling proposes and not everyone's happy about it.
A beached hoodwinker sunfish, the new species described by researchers from Murdoch University. Murdoch University

The four-year treasure hunt for the hoodwinker sunfish

A four-year puzzle has ended with the discovery of a new species of sunfish. These famously strange-looking animals are the largest bony fish in the oceans.

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