Imagine a world where artificial intelligence is in control and humans are brink of extinction. What went wrong? What could we have done? Shutterstock

No problem too big #1: Artificial intelligence and killer robots

No problem too big #1: Artificial intelligence and killer robots. The Conversation, CC BY-SA62 MB (download)
In this special Speaking With podcast episode, a panel of artists and researchers speculates on the end of the world due to artificial intelligence and killer robots, as though it has already happened.
President Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy on Dec. 15, 1961. White House Photographs

JFK at 100: why we still cherish his memory

John Fitzgerald Kennedy consistently ranks as one of America's most popular leaders. A presidential historian argues that didn't just happen – it was the result of an effort to create an image.
Why have successive federal governments not regulated junk food marketing to control obesity? The reasons aren’t as obvious as you might think. from www.shutterstock.com

Fat nation: the rise and fall of obesity on the political agenda

No wonder obesity is a tough public health issue for governments to deal with. Our research has uncovered a range of barriers to tackling it, some more obvious than others.
At a demonstration, Faith Bandler (right) and her daughter Lilon (2R) appeal to national unity as grounds for constitutional amendment. Aboriginal Studies Press

‘Right wrongs, write Yes’: what was the 1967 referendum all about?

The 1967 referendum was the culmination of a long struggle for both Aboriginal rights and respect, for social esteem as well as equality before the law.
Hundreds of large old trees were removed when the Hume Highway was widened. Brian Yap/Flickr

The plan to protect wildlife displaced by the Hume Highway has failed

When the Hume Highway was widened, hundreds of nest boxes were installed to replace habitat for three threatened species. Four years of monitoring has concluded the program is entirely unsuccessful.
Providing green space can deliver health, social and environmental benefits for all urban residents – few other public health interventions can achieve all of this. Anne Cleary

Green space – how much is enough, and what’s the best way to deliver it?

Urban green spaces are most effective at delivering their full range of health, social and environmental benefits when physical improvement of the space is coupled with social engagement.

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