The socialist traffic symbol Ampelmann, seen here in Berlin, constitutes an international brand empire. In the age of mass consumerism, what’s behind a nostalgia for socialist symbols and the sugarcoating of socialist regimes? (Shutterstock)

The odd nostalgia for socialism

Washington Capitals left wing Jakub Vrana jumps into the arms of Alex Ovechkin (8) after scoring the go-ahead goal during Game 5 in the second round of the NHL Stanley Cup hockey playoffs. Cheer for the Caps this Stanley Cup final if you’re hoping the stock market performs well. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Why you should cheer for the Washington Capitals

The Pulitzer Prize winning emcee Kendrick Lamar recently asked a white fan to refrain from rapping the n-word. A video recording of the incident has reignited a controversy that gained wide attention last year. In this 2016 file photo, Kendrick Lamar performs in New York. (Photo by Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP, File)

White people should never rap the n-word

Australian scientist David Goodall photographed in Basel, Switzerland, on May 8, 2018 ended his life in with assisted suicide. (AP Photo/Jamey Keaten)

‘Suicide tourism’ and the Swiss model of the right to die

Recent stories in the media highlight the idea of suicide tourism to Switzerland. But what does that mean? How is the Swiss view of assisted dying different from the Canadian one?
President Nana Akufo-Addo of Ghana addresses the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters in September 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Lessons for a ‘Ghana beyond aid’

Ghanaians respond positively to financial appeals from churches compared to how they respond to paying taxes. Here's how, and why, Ghana's government should learn from religious groups.
Turtles can’t head south for the winter, so they hibernate in rivers, lakes and ponds. (Pexels)

World Turtle Day

The secret to turtle hibernation: Butt-breathing

Crisp temperatures, ice-capped ponds and frozen landscapes send animals scurrying for cover. But just what do turtles do when winter takes hold?
Employees who experience broken promises tend to experience a series of intense negative emotions, which can lead to a desire to dominate, retaliate and get even with their employer. Tim Gouw/Unsplash

Why we all steal office supplies from work

Bringing office supplies home - or stealing from your workplace - may seem like a good idea when you are upset with your boss, but think again, your issues may be easier solved through communication.
Competition between neighbours, rather than between strangers living far apart, amplifies inequality. This can lead to homicide and civil war. Pexels

How competition fuels inequality and conflict

Competition between neighbours turns up the volume on inequality. Homicide and civil war may be the result.
Many associate Christianity with views like those of United States Vice President Mike Pence. In this September 2016 file photo, Mike Pence speaks to supporters at a rally in Missouri. (Shutterstock)

Progressive Christianity shouldn’t be an oxymoron

The words "Christianity" and "progressive" don't seem like they belong in the same sentence anymore. But to many progressive Christians, their religion has always been about social justice.
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr)

New rules aim to protect right whales

After 17 North Atlantic right whales were killed or caught in fishing gear in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2017, the Canadian government set new rules for the snow crab and lobster fisheries.
Far more than eating green vegetables and going to the gym more often, living and working conditions have a big impact on health. Saskatchewan’s new NDP leader is determined to see it reflected in public policy. (Shutterstock)

How work & living conditions can kill us

It's not all about eating leafy green vegetables and working out: Living and working conditions have a profound impact on our health. So why are politicians avoiding taking action?
An addiction to accumulating money is every bit as powerful and destructive as a drug addiction. Upsplash/Sharon McCutcheon

How money is destroying the world

Wealth addiction is as powerful as any other, but instead of urging addicts to get help, we often admire them. Yet they do much more damage to the world at large than your average coke fiend.
President Donald Trump releases a ‘blueprint’ to reduce prescription drug prices, with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, May 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No, raising Canadian drug prices will not help U.S.

The logic behind U.S. president Donald Trump's proposal that Canada and other countries have been “free-riding” off high prices in the United States is bizarre at best.
In this November 2017 photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping prepare to shake their hands after a joint news conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. The China-U.S. trade conflict is about far more than trade; it’s about American efforts to change how China deals with the world. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The China-U.S. conflict is about more than trade

The recent U.S. trade mission to China failed, allowing no space for future compromise. What follows will likely be much more than a simple trade war.
Nature offers many benefits to people. (Shutterstock)

It pays to invest in biodiversity

Governments around the world have vowed to halt the loss of global biodiversity by 2020, but without more investment, we'll miss some of the targets.
Supporters of President Nicolás Maduro hold drawings of him and late President Hugo Chávez during a closing reelection campaign rally in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, May 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

The fight to do research in Venezuela

As Venezuela's May 20 election approaches, scholars and students at the country's autonomous universities continue the fight for knowledge and freedom.
Britain’s Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle appear on the grounds of Kensington Palace in London, Nov. 27, 2017. AP Photo/Matt Dunham

Why do Americans fawn over British royalty?

It might seem strange, especially given the nation’s decision to sever ties with George III in 1776.
Research from around the world shows that at least one in eight teens has had a sexually explicit image of themselves forwarded, without consent. (Shutterstock))

Why sexting must be on the curriculum

Sex-education curricula that openly discuss sexting, consent and other online behaviours have never been more important for teens -- in Ontario and globally.
‘Confessions of an English Opium-Eater’ was the first modern drug memoir and set the tone for opium use for decades. Here: Papaver somniferum (Opium poppy), a group of deep red flowers, buds and seed pods. Opium is extracted from the latex of the unripe seed pods. Ripe seeds are innocuous and widely used in baking. (Rowan McOnegal/Wellcome Collection)

The old book that spawned opioid crisis

'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater' is considered the first modern drug memoir. Many believe it is responsible for our romantic ideas of opium-based drug use today.
Supporters of Malaysia’s opposition coalition party hold party flags in northern Malaysia on the eve of the country’s recent election. Corruption-plagued Najib Razak was voted out while Mahathir Mohamad won. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The Malaysian voters who ousted corruption

Malaysian voters tossed the corrupt Najib Razak out of office despite efforts by his party to sway the result. A former dictator is back in charge, about to free his onetime political foe from jail.

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