Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s threat to wield the notwithstanding clause reveals flaws in Canada’s Constitution in terms of how municipalities are completely unprotected. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Ford fight shows cities are powerless

Sirley Silveira Paixao, an immigrant from Brazil seeking asylum, kisses her 10-year-old son Diego Magalhaes, after he is released from immigration detention in Chicago on July 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

The U.S. is drugging detained children

In this September 1993 photo, U.S. President Bill Clinton presides over White House ceremonies marking the signing of the peace accord between Israel and the Palestinians with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, left, and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, right, in Washington. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Pushing Palestine around nothing new for U.S.

President Donald Trump tosses paper towels into a crowd at Calvary Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico in October 2017 following Hurricane Maria. Trump congratulated Puerto Rico for escaping the higher death toll of “a real catastrophe like Katrina.” A new study suggests almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Politics, paper towels and disaster death tolls

As Trump fumes about the Hurricane Maria death toll, it's clear that politics and political considerations often play an important role in how death toll estimates are communicated to the public.
The Second Cup Ltd. says it is actively reviewing locations in Ontario for potential conversion to cannabis stores in light of a decision by the new provincial government to allow private retailers to sell the drug. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Cannabis with your coffee?

Ontario must quickly create rules for cannabis stores. How the Ford government decides to regulate retailers will have a major impact on how many retailers will get into the business.
It is estimated that 1.2 million children in Canada live in low income households and 10 per cent of families with children under the age of six report some degree of food insecurity. This places kids at increased risk of developmental vulnerability. (Shutterstock)

Why Canada needs a ‘Children’s Charter’

From food insecurity to cyberbullying and teenage suicide, Canada scores low on child health.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg takes his seat to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington in April 2018 about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Big Tech oversells AI as extremism watchdog

Many tech titans say they can self-regulate online hate speech and extremism with artificial intelligence, but can they?
The Ontario government “back to basics” approach to the curriculum will not best serve children who need a mixture of traditional and discovery learning methods. Shutterstock

Make math fun, no matter the teaching method

Premier Doug Ford and Minister of Education Lisa Thompson have told elementary school teachers to expect curriculum change directives for "back to basics" mathematics, a move that could hurt students.
Why isn’t sustainability a part of accounting training? (Shutterstock)

Let’s train accountants in sustainability

Despite the leaders of both countries being champions of fighting climate change, research shows both Canada and France are failing to train their accountants in sustainability. Why?
Plays like ‘Where the Blood Mixes’ (with actors Kim Harvey and Billy Merasty) help shed light on Indigenous stories, helping to educate Canadian audiences. David Cooper

Indigenous theatre needs Canadian government funds

Indigenous theatre and storytelling provides an opportunity for all Canadians to honour the directives of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The Canadian government should support this mission.
Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions

The federal government has set aside $22.2 million to develop and co-ordinate sanctions while educating Canadians about their obligations. Where to start is the first question.
Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease presents unique challenges, when a patient is still working or parenting children.The personality changes involved can result in job loss or divorce before a diagnosis is made. (Shutterstock)

Midlife crisis? Or early Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer's disease affects many people under the age of 65. The 'young-onset' version of the disease is often misdiagnosed as depression or dismissed as a midlife crisis.
The U.S. Capitol is seen here in this January 2018 photo. Three top Russian intelligence officials met with their American counterparts in D.C. in January. Why? (AP Photo)

Why did the Russians travel to Washington?

In January, three top Russian intelligence officials met with their peers in Washington, D.C. What was their goal amid the Robert Mueller investigation? An expert on Russia speculates.
Oophaga andresii is one of the newly described species of Harlequin poison frog. Jose Andrés

Naming poison frogs helps protect them

With their jewel-like colours, Colombia's poison frogs are coveted by collectors. Does naming their species help protect them or make them a target for trophy hunters?
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to reporters in Toronto on Sept. 10, 2018, after announcing he’ll invoke the notwithstanding clause in his battle to shrink Toronto city council. Is Ford taking on the “Court Party?” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov.

Doug Ford’s attack on the ‘Court Party’

Doug Ford’s wielding of the notwithstanding clause is part of a broader opposition to judicial activism that has developed among right-wing politicians and academics in the post-Charter era.
More than 80 per cent of the plasma Canada now uses for medical purposes comes from paid donation in the United States. (Shutterstock)

Why Canadians should be paid for plasma

Canada suffers a shortage of vital blood plasma. Paying donors, through a non-profit like Canadian Blood Services, would secure a local supply without lining the pockets of corporate shareholders.
If you ditch the Cinderella story and intentionally craft romantic relationships to suit you – evidence from business and philosophy says you might have a good chance of deep happiness. (Shutterstock)

How to ‘love-craft’ your relationships

A polyamorous philosopher draws from research evidence to argue that where love is concerned, we should break all the established rules.
‘Hotel Mumbai’ is a gripping film that provides a glimpse into the fear and brutality of terrorism but also the everyday bravery of its victims. Here Armie Hammer in ‘Hotel Mumbai.’ Courtesy of TIFF

Terrorism at the Taj: ‘Hotel Mumbai’ pulls no punches at TIFF

'Hotel Mumbai,' which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, is an 'anthem of resistance;' a film that highlights the things ordinary people can do in extraordinary circumstances.
The lynch-pin of the marketing for the new ‘Titans’ TV series is a line in which Robin says “F@#k Batman!” Warner Bros. Television

Titans on TV: The magic of ‘F@#k Batman!’

In the trailer for the new DC TV series, Robin answers 'F@#k Batman!' when the bad guys ask about the Caped Crusader. This is a hopeful move to necessary character changes in superhero storytelling.
Farm near Seven Springs, North Carolina, surrounded by water on Oct. 25, 1999, nearly six weeks after Hurricane Floyd. AP Photo/Karen Tam

The inland damage of hurricanes

Hurricanes in the southern US have caused widespread damage inland in recent decades, mainly through river flooding. But evacuations and stormproofing focus almost entirely on keeping people safe on the coasts.
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No easy resolution to Trans Mountain pipeline

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
People buy fruits and vegetables in May 2017 at the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal. (Shutterstock)

Canadian food policy moves closer to reality

A government report on an upcoming national food policy is an optimistic indication that it will result in both healthier and more sustainable food for Canadians and stronger agri-food industry.

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