A trade official from the United States walks past a sign Monday where Canadian, American and Mexican officials are holding North American free trade talks in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

NAFTA talks: Seeing benefits through bluster

New Zealand Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern, centre, and deputy leader Kelvin Davis, a Maori, far left, answer questions from the media in August in Wellington, New Zealand. Following the Sept. 23 election, Ardern could became the country’s next prime minister if she can convince minor parties to support her. (AP Photo/Nick Perry)

What New Zealand vote means for the Indigenous

There are real consequences to ignoring children’s pain in hospital. These include increased sensitivity to pain, abnormal social behaviours when older and higher levels of anxiety before a future procedure. (Shutterstock)

Seven ways to ease your child’s pain in hospital

Kim Jong Un guides the test-fire of Pukguksong-2 in an undated photo released on Feb. 13, 2017. Reuters/KCNA

Will North Korea sell its nuclear technology?

Kim Jong Un's regime has already earned millions from the export of arms, missiles, drugs and endangered wildlife products.
Community-led research in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Labrador, helped identify dirty water containers as a source of drinking water contamination.

Collaboration can aid Indigenous water crisis

Can community-led research help address Canada's Indigenous water security issues? One project from the Inuit community of Rigolet in Labrador suggests it can.
The Scream, by Kent Monkman (2016), is part of a traveling exhibition this year on colonized Canada: Shame And Prejudice: A Story Of Resilience. Kent Monkman

All mouth and no ears: Settlers with Opinions

A leading Indigenous academic says too many Canadians take ugly pleasure in being ignorant about Indigenous issues. It's time for some straight talk about Settlers with Opinions.
Residential school survivor Lorna Standingready is comforted by a fellow survivor during the closing ceremony of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Ways to put Indigenous knowledge in class

"What have we failed to know and at what cost?" An education professor draws upon Indigenous literature to support a personal journey into classroom decolonization.
Dairy cows at a family farm in Chilliwack, B.C. Sylvain Charlebois, a noted academic on food policy issues, says the federal government’s proposed tax reforms will hurt family farms. CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Tax reforms will hurt family businesses

Family farms, restaurants, other food businesses and the rural economy will suffer under federal tax proposals for small businesses,
Southpaws seem to be more common among cats and dogs than humans. Eric Isselee/Shutterstock.com

I’ve always wondered: Can animals be left- and right-pawed?

The animal kingdom is full of lefties and righties, although rarely is the ratio skewed as much as it is in humans. If you're wondering about your own pet, you can find out with a simple experiment.
Dr. Zahra Moussavi tests a device that stimulates the brain with magnetic pulses. The experimental technology can temporarily roll back effects of Alzheimer’s disease. (Zahra Moussavi)

Experimental technology can rewind Alzheimer’s disease

When Zahra Moussavi's mother developed Alzheimer's, the scientist pursued a technology that directly stimulates the brain with electromagnets to mitigate the effects of the disease. It worked.
Surgeons at the University of Saskatchewan use a 3D printed human brain to plan complex neurosurgical procedures for patients with movement disorders.

3D printers: Revolution in space, earth medicine

From cheap prosthetic arms for landmine victims in Sudan to the promise of surgery on astronauts in space — 3D printing is sparking a healthcare revolution.
Creating a ‘digital story’ of their memories using photos, music, text and video, can hep dementia patients open up to their fear and move into optimism. (Shutterstock)

World Alzheimer's Day

Digital stories spark joy in people with dementia

When dementia patients use photos and music to produce digital stories about events in their lives, they start to remember. They also face their fears about the disease, and experience happiness.
Grizzly trophy-hunting is at the heart of a ferocious debate in North America. (Shutterstock)

Fierce debate roars over grizzly bear hunt

A bitter debate has erupted over the British Columbia government's recent decision to end grizzly bear trophy hunting. Here are the pros and cons of stopping the hunt.
Research shows that night waking in infancy is associated with behavioural control challenges at three and four years of age. (Shutterstock)

Children and sleep: How much do they really need?

Poor sleep in infants and children has been linked to an array of problems, from aggression to poor school performance to diabetes, obesity and suicide. Our expert reviews the science.
In this April 15, 2017, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves during a military parade in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

Will China do the right thing about North Korea?

China could win unprecedented global credibility by emerging as the champion of an international effort that fixes the North Korea problem once and for all. Does it have the moxie?
Thousands of copper nails representing thousands of Indigenous children who died in Canada’s residential schools were hammered into the Reconciliation Pole before its raising at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., on April 1, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why most teachers need Indigenous coaches

Many Canadian teachers worry about how to incorporate Indigenous content into the classroom. For one sociology professor, finding Indigenous mentorship was richly rewarding.

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  1. What New Zealand’s vote means for Maori – and potentially First Nations in Canada
  2. All mouth and no ears: Settlers with Opinions
  3. Children and sleep: How much do they really need?
  4. Fierce debate roars to life over grizzly bear hunt
  5. Experimental brain technology can rewind Alzheimer’s disease

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