Violations of academic integrity show Canada is not immune to academic misconduct — and more research is needed to effectively ensure academic quality. (Shutterstock)

Cheating may be under-reported in Canada

In this Jan. 8, 2020 photo, rescue workers search the scene where a Ukrainian plane crashed in Shahedshahr, southwest of the capital Tehran, Iran. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Ebrahim Noroozi

Iran’s reckless incompetence

Vancouver Canucks goalie Jacob Markstrom, of Sweden, looks on during the first period of an NHL hockey game against the Carolina Hurricanes in Vancouver, on Dec. 12, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The NHL’s culture problems have solutions

Hockey's scandals don't have to persist if the federal government and the leagues can come together around the new safe sport policies.
Protesters chant slogans and hold up posters of Qassem Soleimani during a demonstration in front of the British Embassy in Tehran on Jan. 12, 2020. AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi

The long history of the Iranian-American conflict

The history of the Iran-United States relationship is complex and often brutal. Understanding it helps put today's turmoil into sharper focus.
Tourists visit Persepolis, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, northeast of the Iranian city of Shiraz. AP Photo/Vahid Salemi

Iran-U.S. crisis reminds us how culture matters

When the loss of this heritage is used as a weapon of war, it represents a loss for the country affected as well as for humanity. It targets the memories, history and identity of a people.
Controversy erupted after a lecturer at the University of Alberta posted on Facebook in November that the Holomodor is a “myth.” Canada recognized the Holomodor — the death of millions of Ukrainians in 1932–33 due to Soviet policies — as an act of genocide in 2008. Here, the Holodomor Memorial, Kyiv, Ukraine. (Flickr/Matt Shalvatis)

Universities should stand for integrity & public trust

Those teaching in publicly funded universities should be held accountable for denying the public record, whether in their classrooms or beyond.
The nuclear power plant in Pickering, Ont., was the subject of a false alarm. (Shutterstock)

The fallout from a false nuclear alarm

A nuclear alarm was issued on Jan. 12, 2020. The alarm had been mistakenly sent during a training exercise and was retracted, but the impact will erode trust in public safety efforts.
The Goop Lab launches Jan. 24, 2020: it will likely be full of magical thinking and unproven health stories — making it a huge conflict of interest for Gwyneth Paltrow. (Shutterstock)

Goop Lab is an infomercial for Paltrow’s business

Gwyneth Paltrow's new Netflix series, The Goop Lab, raises serious questions about the spread of health misinformation as well as the conflict of interest the show represents.
Billions of tires are produced each year, a significant portion of which end up in landfills and dumps. (Shutterstock)

New recycling technique: tires into reusables

Until recently, there were few ways in which tires could be recycled or repurposed – but researchers have discovered a new chemical process that shows promise.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pauses as he speaks during a news conference in Ottawa on Jan. 11. Trudeau says Iran must take full responsibility for mistakenly shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner, killing all 176 civilians on board. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s non-diplomacy puts Canadians at risk in an unstable Middle East

The downing of Flight PS752 isn't just the result of Canada being caught in U.S.-Iran crossfire. It's also the result of an unnecessarily aggressive posture of Canada's own against Iran in 2012.
Although surveillance technologies appear to be race-neutral, modern police surveillance technologies do not operate outside racial bias. (ShotSpotter)

Police surveillance tech can be tools of white supremacy

Rather than helping and providing new unbiased tools for policing, police surveillance technologies tend to be reactionary and biased.
“With art, you have all the colours in the world to share your thoughts,” wrote one youth in the Holistic Arts-based Program at Laurentian University. (Unsplash/Rahul Jain)

Arts teach marginalized kids mindfulness

Important learning takes place through experiences of fun and belonging at an arts-based mindfulness program.
A woman walks through the shattered streets of Port-au-Prince a few weeks after the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake slammed the country, which has still not recovered despite billions of dollars being spent. Rodrigo Abd/AP Photo, File

Haiti still struggles to recover from earthquake

Ten years after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, the country is still struggling to recover and remains vulnerable to natural disasters.
Trump is seen in the Oval Office in early January 2020. Viewing him as a cult leader and his supporters as cult followers doesn’t help us understand why he appeals to some voters. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Why it’s wrong to refer to the ‘cult of Trump’

There are many legitimate ways to critique Donald Trump, but demonizing his voters as cult followers doesn’t help us understand why they are attracted to him and how their world view has developed.
The Queen Bee myth has more to do with how companies are structured than it does with women actually undermining one another at work. (Shutterstock)

The false myth of the workplace Queen Bee

At a time when corporations are struggling to address gender gaps at all levels, killing off stereotyped myths such as the Queen Bee Syndrome is essential.
Healthy, full-term Inuit babies are not eligible for palivizumab even though they have four to 10 times the rate of hospital admission compared to “high-risk” infants. (Philippe Put/flickr)

Inuit infants need drug to protect against illness

A drug called palivizumab can keep babies infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) out of the hospital, but many Inuit babies, who have a higher risk of infection, are not getting it.
U.S. President Donald Trump was flanked by military officers as he responded to the ballistic missile strike that Iran launched against Iraqi air bases housing U.S. troops. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The U.S. is unlikely to go to war with Iran

Iran's missile strikes on Iraqi bases in response to the killing of Iranian general Qassem Soleimani have raised tensions between the U.S. and Iran. But war seems unlikely at this point.
In an official White House photo, President Donald Trump stands alone. Shealah Craighead/White House

Trump tests limits of presidential war powers

Both President Trump and President Obama used military force without informing Congress, or getting its approval. But the differences reveal more than the similarities.

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