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Ontario Premier Doug Ford talks to the media on a construction site in Brampton, Ont., in May 2022. Later in the year, the Ford government justified its adoption of sweeping housing legislation and the opening of parts of the Greater Toronto Area Greenbelt for development, stating that it was needed to address “the housing supply crisis.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Has Ontario’s housing ‘plan’ been built on a foundation of evidentiary sand?

Evidence suggests that Ontario neither had a shortage of pre-authorized housing starts to accommodate its growing population, nor did it have a shortage of designated land to build such homes.
Using electricity to manually delete emails can actually have a greater carbon impact than simply storing them. (Unsplash)

Can sending fewer emails or emptying your inbox really help fight climate change?

Digital activities, like sending emails, contribute marginally to the annual carbon footprint of information and communication technology users.
Scientists say that wasting coffee and water while making a cup of coffee has a larger carbon footprint than using coffee capsules. (Unsplash)

Here’s how your cup of coffee contributes to climate change

Coffee capsules aren’t the biggest carbon culprits. It’s better to use a capsule than to waste coffee and water.
A pumpjack draws out oil and gas from a well head near Calgary in October 2022. There are thousands of inactive oil and gas wells in the province that have not been properly decommissioned. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Despite soaring profits, oil companies are not paying enough for their environmental damage

The Alberta government is failing to ensure environmental liabilities are adequately accounted for and that progress is being made to address the province’s massive tailings ponds.
Protesters interrupt a speech by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau — demanding that the government stop invading Indigenous land — during the opening ceremony of COP15, the UN conference on biodiversity, in Montréal, on Dec. 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Indigenous conservation funding must reflect Canada’s true debt to First Nations, Inuit and Métis

In order to meet its 2030 biodiversity targets, Canada is heavily relying on Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas, which could do more harm than good for First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
Hundreds of freshwater basins across the world, including the dried-up Santa Olalla permanent freshwater lagoon, in Spain’s Doñana National Park, are the most likely to experience social and ecological impacts due to freshwater use. (Donana Biological Station/CSIC)

Ripple effect: As global freshwater basins dry up, the threat to ecosystems and communities grows

While we know how global changes in freshwater pose risks to humans and ecosystems, we know less about how people and ecosystems will respond to these global freshwater challenges.
The Fulford Harbour sea garden clam bed was built by First Nations in the Salish Sea near Salt Spring Island, B.C. Despite growing recognition that lands managed by Indigenous Peoples are, on average, more biodiverse, biodiversity conservation has typically marginalized Indigenous Peoples. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

COP15: Canada failed to meet its 2020 conservation targets. Will 2030 be any better?

As we set conservation goals for the next decade, we need to evaluate what worked and what didn’t in our efforts to meet the 2020 biodiversity conservation targets.
Climate conferences provide platforms for collaboration among countries, venues for interaction across levels of governance and critical events to mobilize civil society and media coverage. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

COP27 failed. So why continue with these UN climate summits?

There have been 27 UN COP meetings. Despite these negotiations, the planet is on target to exceed emission thresholds for global warming. Given these failures, why continue with this process?
The warming of the Gulf of St. Lawrence is causing upheaval in the balance of species, with direct repercussions on the commercial fishing sector. Shutterstock
St. Lawrence River: In Depth

Warming waters in the Gulf of St. Lawrence are disrupting commercial fishing

The warming observed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence is causing upheaval in the balance of the species living there. That is having direct repercussions on the commercial fishing sector.
COP27 has given countries and organizations yet another chance to push for a managed decline in fossil fuel production. A climate action banner hangs from the Tower bridge in London in April 2022. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali)
COP27

COP27: Which countries will push to end fossil fuel production? And which won’t?

A managed fossil fuel phasing-out offers a chance for producers – including governments, corporations and unions – to negotiate the terms of a ‘just transition’ to renewable energy.
The O d'écH2osystème is a wheel four meters in diameter that can be attached by crane to the deck of a ship, a wharf or the banks of the small and large municipalities along the shores of the St. Lawrence River. (Geneviève Dupéré)
St. Lawrence River: In Depth

Exploring the St. Lawrence River through the performing arts

This article crosses from the river to the stage, to explore the St. Lawrence at the meeting point of marine and freshwater sciences, the fishing, maritime and port industries, and the circus arts.
Co-author of this article, Chief Ninawa, hereditary Chief of the Huni Kui Indigenous people of the Amazon, holds a sign that says: ‘Amazon is life, petroleum and gas is death’ outside a hotel in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
COP27

Views from COP27: How the climate conference could confront colonialism by centring Indigenous rights

A different future will not be possible without reverence, respect, reciprocity and responsibility towards the Earth. On this issue, Indigenous Peoples have a lot to share.

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