This image captures the hope felt by many Canadians four years ago as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, centre, posing for selfies with airport workers, greeted refugees from Syria arriving on a government-sponsored airplane in Toronto, on Dec. 10, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Syrian refugees in Canada: 4 years after the welcome

The Beardy Blackhawks show solidarity after a game, thank each other and bring the game to a close, at Beardy’s Okemasis First Nation, Sask., Nov. 21, 2019. Robert Henry

Truth and Reconciliation in Canada

Bring back Beardy’s Blackhawks

Regional Chief Terry Teegee speaks to the press n Victoria on Oct. 24, 2019 after Premier John Horgan announced Indigenous human rights will be recognized in B.C. with new legislation . THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolit

Truth and Reconciliation in Canada

B.C. takes historic step for Indigenous rights

A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Experiences of a woman engineer since the Montréal Massacre

Don Cherry, left, at the Manitoba Legislature building in Winnipeg, September 2009, as part of the “Honouring Canada’s Olympic and Paralympic Athletes Day,” and Archie Bunker, right. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Afexa Life Sciences Inc./ YouTube

What Canada’s Archie Bunker shows us about cancel culture

Without implying that Don Cherry is deserving of a second chance given his track record, it wouldn't be a bad thing if bridged differences resulted in redemption instead of cancellation.
A Palestinian protester throws a Molotov cocktail during clashes with Israeli troops during demonstrations against the Israeli offensive on Gaza in November 2019. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

What constitutes fair and unfair criticism of Israel?

There's little hope as we head into 2020 that Israel will negotiate in good faith with Palestinian leaders. Yet Israel will never be safe from attack until it does so.
Torstar, the parent company of the Toronto Star, is the latest news company to announce job cuts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Eduardo Lima

Canadian journalism: Fewer jobs, less security

The nature of journalistic work in Canada has changed substantially. Data and trends shed some light on the current state of journalism in Canada.
Indigenous knowledge is an essential asset in the adaptation to climate change. Image of a remote community in Nunavik, where resources are limited. (Mylène Ratelle)

Climate policy must reflect Indigenous resilience

Although marginalized from policy decisions, northern Indigenous communities have maintained and developed strong social networks to help them cope with climate change.
Are gig workers lonely and isolated? Or independent and liberated? New research suggests despite assumptions about freedom, gig workers report feeling lonely and powerless. (Unsplash)

Workers in the gig economy are lonely

An upcoming study on workers in the gig economy suggests the future of work may be a lonely and uncertain one for many workers.
SOS Mediterranee team members from the humanitarian ship Ocean Viking approach a boat in distress with 30 people on board in the waters off Libya on Nov. 20, 2019. (Hannah Wallace Bowman/MSF via AP)

EU countries struggle to relocate migrants

The EU's proposals for relocating migrants is inefficient in measuring whether member states actually have the economic capacity to welcome asylum-seekers.
Canadian newsrooms seem reluctant to share data on the diversity of their newsrooms but doing so would help hold accountable the fifth estate. (Bank Phrom/Unsplash)

Newsrooms not meeting changing demographics

Over the past two decades, as Canada’s demographics have shifted, news organizations have failed to reflect the country's increasing diversity in both content and staffing.
Centuries after Dante, it’s surprising to find the afterlife back, and winning awards as a successful series. Here, from left to right, actors Kristen Bell, William Jackson Harper, and Ted Danson. (NBC)

‘The Good Place’ asks deep ethical questions

For all its fart jokes and sight gags, 'The Good Place' belongs to a venerable philosophical and theological tradition.
Cannabis plants are seen during a tour of a Hexo Corp. production facility in October 2018 in Masson-Angers, Québec. The province is raising the legal cannabis age to 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Québec is wrong to raise its legal cannabis age

Québec government policy is working against the objectives of cannabis legalization.
Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett (95) hits Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph (2) with a helmet during a National Football League game Nov. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Myles Garrett, Don Cherry and the sports boys’ club

Attempts to disrupt or challenge normative, sporty masculinity has been met by outrage by those who cannot see nor hear the tribalism and male privilege of masculinized spaces like locker rooms.
Youngsters play pond hockey in Ottawa on Christmas Day 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Cherry debacle highlights hockey’s whiteness

Don Cherry's recent divisive and discriminatory comments remind us of how white hockey remains. It's time to transform the sport into a more inclusive pastime.
Don Cherry, seen here in 2014 as Rogers unveiled its team for the network’s NHL coverage, has rasied difficult questions for Canadians. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Cherry’s xenophobia forces tough questions

Can Canadians pick up Don Cherry's discussion from here, and have respectful and inclusive discussions about how we can do better in terms of how we treat and regard newcomers?
With the ubiquity and availability of devices connected to the internet, access to pornography is easier than it has ever been. (Charles/Unsplash)

Watching porn rewires the brain

Cognitive neuroscience finds that regular consumption of pornography affects the centres of the brain responsible for willpower, impulse control and morality.
Some of the young people who are part of the lawsuit filed against the federal government, seen at a press conference in Vancouver, B.C., in October 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Kids facing climate change are taking governments to court

Two recent legal cases in Canada help explain the evolution of climate activism here and around the rest of the world.
Chrystia Freeland, newly named deputy prime minister and minister of intergovernmental affairs, speaks following the swearing-in of the new cabinet at Rideau Hall in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Freeland: Promoted or doomed to failure?

Whether Chrystia Freeland's new roles in Justin Trudeau's cabinet are a promotion or a dead end depends on where party and regional alliances can be built.
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Chrystia Freeland meet in Edmonton after she was named deputy prime minister and minister of intergovernmental affairs. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Amber Bracken

Freeland will have to navigate misogyny

If successful, Chrystia Freeland could help bolster national unity and Canada’s relationships with the U.S. and Mexico. But relentless sexist attacks against her could derail progress.

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