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One of the most common reactions during a crisis is the urge to help others. Here a health-care worker watches as the first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are delivered to a long-term care facility in Montréal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

From the Cold War to COVID-19: How people behave in a crisis

A bronze statue in Tulsa, Okla., commemorating the abuse and terrorism suffered by Black people in the city, much of it at the hands of the Ku Klux Klan. The KKK successfully overthrew a governor who tried to outlaw the organization. (Pexels)

A forgotten coup in the American heartland echoes Trump

Olivia Wheeler, Taiwo Afolabi and Tianxu Zhao perform a play in honour of UN World Refugee Day, June 20, 2017, at Victoria City Hall. (John Threfall)

World Refugee Day theatre shows the art of inclusion

Safe spaces for conversations around immigrants’ experiences are important because identity is central to diversity and inclusion in the 21st century. Theatre can be a tool for community engagement.
Surrounded by army cadets, U.S. President Donald Trump watches the first half of the 121st Army-Navy Football Game at the United States Military Academy in New York City on Dec. 12, 2020. (Shutterstock)

From biblical times to Trump, false messiahs have doomed societies

The messianic language used in relationship to Donald Trump and QAnon conspiracy theories have their roots in Christian expectations of messianic deliverance.
A supporter of President Donald Trump, seen wearing a QAnon shirt, is confronted by Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber during the invasion of the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

QAnon and the storm of the U.S. Capitol

Conspiracy theories spread online are the backbone of Donald Trump's falsehoods about his loss in the U.S. election. The real world consequences of those conspiracies have now exploded.
The pandemic has served as a reminder that unexpected events can change our life plans, and has also made it difficult to plan for 2021. (Shutterstock)

New Year’s resolutions 2021: Getting to the end of COVID-19

New Year's resolutions are usually an opportunity to think about long-term goals. The uncertainty and restrictions of COVID-19 make 2021 a good year to focus on ways to help yourself in the short-term.
If you’re getting bored of your usual fitness routine, there are many online options to try. (Julia Daun)

5 ways to get the most out of online fitness classes during COVID-19

The restrictions put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic have led to a boom in online fitness opportunities. Here's what to look for in online classes.
Jana Jandal Alirifai, a 17-year-old Syrian Canadian and coordinator for Climate Strike Canada, participated as a Syrian delegate in the MockCOP26. (Tahmina Aziz)

Young Muslim women are leading environmental movements

Historically, Muslim scholars have coupled their study of nature to their understanding of Allah. Today, young Muslim women are leading change through an Islamic eco-consciousness with grit.
Poet Miriam Waddington (left) participated in the rise of modernist Canadian poetry and Helen Weinzweig (right) wrote the classic feminist novel ‘Basic Black with Pearls.’ (John Reeves/ /Image (cropped) courtesy Archives & Special Collections, University of New Brunswick)

Daring reads by the first generation of Canadian Jewish women writers

A rich diversity of Canadian Jewish experience is reflected in the poems of Miriam Waddington and the prose of Adele Wiseman, Fredelle Bruser Maynard, Helen Weinzweig and Shirley Faessler.
Once domestic violence victims call police, they sometimes regret they did and feel retraumatized by investigators. (Pixabay)

Domestic violence victims feel retraumatized by police

On Canada's National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, it's time to challenge the revictimization of victims of domestic violence by aggressive police action.
A teacher holds a child as young women learn business skills at Centre D'Apprentissage Feminin (C.A.FE.) in Bamako, Mali, Africa in June 2018. The school is funded by the Canadian NGO Education internationale, a co-operative offering exchange and development services in education. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Sean Kilpatrick

COVID-19 is stifling efforts to promote gender equality

COVID-19 has presented an opportunity to increase gender equality both in Canada and worldwide. Rebuilding with women at the forefront will help communities succeed post-pandemic.
United States Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris speaks on Nov. 24, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The world needs more women leaders — during COVID-19 and beyond

Gender parity leads to collaboration and a blending of visions, and paves the way for the adoption of more comprehensive and inclusive solutions than if they're conceived from only one perspective.
Players for the Connecticut Sun and the Las Vegas Aces square off during basketball’s WNBA semi-final in September 2020 in Bradenton, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

What pro sports should learn from resilient women athletes post-pandemic

Women athletes and pro sports leagues are doing more with less, seizing the moment and expectations during the COVID-19 pandemic. When the crisis passes, professional sport should follow their lead.

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