Paramilitary soldiers walk past Rapid Action Force (RAF) soldiers standing guard during security lockdown in Jammu, India, Aug. 9, 2019. The restrictions on public movement throughout Kashmir have forced people to stay indoors. All communications and the internet have been cut off. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Modi ushers in a new intolerant India

An Indian paramilitary soldier checks the bag of a Kashmiri man during curfew in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir. The lives of millions in India’s only Muslim-majority region have been upended recently. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

Call the crime in Kashmir by its name: Genocide

In this March 1938 photo, Adolf Hitler salutes German troops parading in Vienna, Austria, the country of his birth. (AP Photo)

How Hitler became German

A sign of how historical #MeToo felt in 2017 is this appearance by #MeToo founder Tarana Burke with TV personality Allison Hagendorf on stage at the New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square on Dec. 31, 2017, in New York. (Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)

Must sexual assault be denounced in public?

The relationship between guns and masculinity was once sanctioned by governments and businesses, making it entrenched and difficult to challenge. Kyle Johnson/Unsplash

Canada once sold the idea that guns turned boys into men

The relationship between guns and masculinity was once sanctioned by governments and businesses, making it entrenched and difficult to challenge.
Members of the National Council of Canadian Muslims Mustafa Farooq, left, and Bochra Manaï, right, speak during a news conference in Montréal, June 17, 2019, where plans were outlined to lawfully challenge Québec’s Bill 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Will Québec’s Bill 21 spur bullying in schools?

Québec schools must consider Bill 21's potential impact on students. Bullying researchers have found links between publicly permitted behaviour and personal expression.
It’s important to help children understand that death is part of life. Here, the father, Mufasa, voiced by James Earl Jones, and his son, Simba, voiced by JD McCrary, in a scene from ‘The Lion King.’ (Disney via AP)

What ‘The Lion King’ teaches us about children’s grief

'The Lion King' illustrates how a child moves through five stages of grief with the support of loving friends, family and community.
B.C. green-lighted an exploration permit to a mining company, despite the fact that plans for a mine were rejected both federally and by the Tsilhqot’in National Government. (Garth Lenz/ Tsilhqot’in National Government)

Tsilhqot’in blockade points to failures of justice impeding reconciliation in Canada

Dasiqox Tribal Park offers a powerful example of what true reconciliation can mean for Canada when Indigenous peoples and their rights are respected and upheld.
Canada’s Christian right is largely isolated, and has little of the clout of evangelicals south of the border. (Shutterstock)

Canada’s marginal ‘Christian right’

While they're not going away, evangelicals and social conservatives in Canada are distinctly different from the American Christian right.
Aug. 12, 2017: white nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

The 100-year-old rallying cry of ‘white genocide’

White supremacists push an agenda that have their followers believing they are in danger of extinction. But their 'race suicide' ideas are based on 100-year-old unscientific and racist research.
People protest gun violence outside the White House on Feb. 19 following the latest mass school shooting, this one in Florida. Like the teens and children who showed up at the White House and elsewhere to protest, Americans must rediscover themselves as a revolutionary people who are not afraid to start over. (Shutterstock)

From the archives

U.S. gun violence is a symptom of a long historical problem

Proposals for gun control run into vehement opposition from many Americans who, for deep historical reasons of race and revolution, continue to claim the right to use deadly force.
Reading and books are more important than ever for contemporary society. Here an image of The Rose Main Reading Room at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (also known as New York Public Library Main Branch) – an elegant study hall in the heart of Manhattan. Patrick Robert Doyle /Unsplash

Libraries can have 3-D printers but they are still about books

Today's libraries build communities and provide space for learning new technologies but it is critical that they continue to be about books and reading too.
Mourners in Dayton, Ohio on Aug. 4, 2019 after a mass shooting there killed at least nine people. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Could a national buyback program reduce gun violence in America?

More than 40 percent of U.S. adults have a gun in their household, making it hard to get guns off the streets – even if new gun restrictions are passed.
A new city ordinance in Berkeley, Calif., that officially changes the name from ‘manhole cover’ to ‘maintenance cover’ has stirred up a media commotion. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

The uproar over taking ‘man’ out of ‘manhole’

A progressive city's new ordinance on gender-neutral language provokes a worldwide media storm.
The U.S. women’s soccer team celebrates with the trophy after winning the World Cup final. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Big brands could solve gender pay gap in sport

Women’s sports have been stuck in a boom-and-bust cycle for the past 20 years. It’s time to start a new narrative.
The famous sex researcher Alfred Kinsey once said the only unnatural sex act is one that can’t be performed. Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

Pride 2019

There are many ways to have sex – and none are unnatural

As North Americans celebrate Pride this summer, we should take it as a reminder of our colourful sexual diversity, and also the infinite ways to have sex, with nothing unnatural with any of them.
Aug. 12, 2017: white nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

From the archives

The 100-year-old rallying cry of ‘white genocide’

White supremacists push an agenda that have their followers believing they are in danger of extinction. But their 'race suicide' ideas are based on 100-year-old unscientific and racist research.

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How we are different

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  1. The roots of America’s white nationalism reach back to this island’s brutal history
  2. Understanding how Hitler became German helps us deal with modern-day extremists
  3. Baby naming time? Here’s how people judge what’s in a name
  4. What ‘The Lion King’ teaches us about children’s grief
  5. Canada’s marginal ‘Christian right’

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