Despite the demonization of marginalized communities by politicians on the campaign trail, research shows they’re marked by a profound sense of community, supportive social networks – and resilience. A Toronto Regent Park resident, a boy named Cody, is seen as part of an art installation in this 2008 photo. Dan Bergeron/fauxreel.ca

The strength of marginalized communities

Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Québec’s push to ban the hijab is ‘sexularism’

The Québec government's push to ban the hijab is 'sexularism' and also basic nationalism – one that pits an ‘us’ against ‘them,’ where the ‘them’ represent multiple threats to the nation.
While media portrayals of online sperm donation often portray “rogue breeders” or “super sperm,” research reveals that the real men who do this are motivated to help others. (Shutterstock)

Meet the men who donate sperm on Facebook

Sperm donation websites are the Ubers and Airbnbs of the fertility world. But why are they so popular? New research explains the reasons why some men donate.
A YouTube producer trying to create a parody of ‘The Simpsons’ found out that Apu is being phased out of the show. While many will miss Apu, others reflect on what his character represents – a flat stereotype of South Asian immigrants. The Simpsons

Goodbye Apu – here’s what you meant to us

Recent rumours of Apu's demise may be exaggerated but his presence has been slowly written out of 'The Simpsons,' and many feel it is time for the stereotyped Indian-American character to go.
A scene from ‘Boy Erased,’ released this month. The film depicts Christian conversion therapy, something the author has experienced and strongly recommends be outlawed in Canada and globally. Focus pictures

Why conversion therapies must be outlawed

In 2018, Hollywood released two films depicting youth forced into Christian ex-gay conversion therapy programs. A survivor of these programs tells the story.
A photograph by Oliver de Ros presents a different impression of the migrants at the Guatemalan border than the standard tropes published. Migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border wait on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)

Depictions of migration tell misleading stories

Photographs can influence us -- they can inspire us to act and they can also impact the way we think about issues. The recent published photos about the migrant 'caravan' convey several stereotypes.
In 2016, nearly 10 percent of American kids were living in three-generation households, like this one in Detroit, Michigan. AP Photo/Paul Sancya

Three-generation households on the rise

Over the past 20 years, the number of American households that have grandparents, their kids and their grandkids living under the same roof has nearly doubled.
Nine months after Parkland, students like David Hogg have joined the youth voter wave. AP Photo/John Raoux

2018 midterm: Historic jump in young voters

A survey shows the newest generation on the voting block is extremely cynical, and that drove record numbers of them out to vote.
Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918.

Therapeutic writing helped to heal a nation

Writers like Virginia Woolf, Arthur Conan Doyle and J.M. Barrie suffered personal loss during the First World War. Their grief and insight helped readers with their own post-war collective grief.
Memorial bench at the University of Saskatchewan. Bill Waiser

The importance of First World War memorials

On the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, the University of Saskatchewan will be dedicating a memorial bench on the university campus.
Passengers aboard the MS St. Louis from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Photo Archives. Courtesy of Dr. Liane Reif-Lehrer. Copyright of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Canada apologizes for refusing 1939 refugees: Novels that teach about our past

We can learn a lot about our past from fictional stories. In 'What is Left the Daughter,' author Howard Norman presents a cautionary tale from the Second World War of xenophobia and prejudice.
A scholar takes a pilgrimage of the Western Front to try to comprehend the loss of lives of the First World War. Here British soldiers in a battlefield trench, c. 1915-1918. Shutterstock

An infinity of waste – the brutal reality of the First World War

From the Swiss border to the English channel, a scholar describes his pilgrimage of the Western Front as a tribute to fallen soldiers and to learn more about the devastating loss of life.
People place flowers at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

What history reveals about anti-Semitic surges

After the killing of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, a scholar explains why this hate crime reminds her of the political climate between the two world wars in the US.
In this combo photo, German Chancellor Angela Merkel leads the weekly cabinet meeting of her government at the chancellery in Berlin. Merkel has been at the helm of the German government since 2005 but she has announced she won’t run for the party’s leadership again. (AP Photos/Markus Schreiber, file)

What’s next for Germany after Angela Merkel

Germany's long-time Angela Merkel era is coming to an end. But is it the end of one person’s dominance of the political scene, or does it forebode more fundamental changes to German society?
Images of Donald Trump from the midterm campaign. Illustration by Bob Britten

What image will define the 2018 election?

Here's a riddle: What's the dominant image of the 2018 election campaign? There isn't one. But there are many.
Most Canadians have a higher probability of dying of heart disease than winning something in the McDonald’s Monopoly game. THE CONVERSATION CANADA/Scott White

The real odds of winning McDonald’s Monopoly

McDonald's Canada has brought back its popular Monopoly game. A statistician explains the odds of winning the top prizes and how that compares to the odds we confront in everyday life.
The original Halloween movie has been remade for 2018. Dimension Films

Harnessing the power of fear

We love to be scared by creepy movies. But fear has other uses too. It can be used negatively by politicians to control us, but can also be a tool to harness internal change.
Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould holds a press conference in the foyer of the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, March 29, 2018, regarding the criminal justice system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Proposed law may end legal aid for low-income people

Bill C-75 was introduced to the House as a way to fix issues with the criminal justice system. However, an unintended consequence is that low-income people will lose access to law school clinics.
There is a long history of ‘visual apartheid’ in the advertising of the outdoors industry – an absence of Indigenous, Black and other people of colour. (Unsplash/Esther wiegardt)

Everyone belongs outdoors

Canada's iconic retailer of outdoor adventure gear recently decided to change its mostly white image by diversifying the catalogue to better reflect the reality of its customers.
An old Canadian law which outlaws magic fraud is about to be eliminated. This print by William Hogarth, ‘Credulity Superstition and Fanaticism,’ from 1762 epitomizes the Enlightenment view that witchcraft and religious fanaticism go hand in hand. William Hogarth/1762

Magic & witchcraft are here to stay

An antiquated Canadian law against magic and witchcraft is about to be repealed. A close look at its history reveals that it is far less superstitious than it appears.

Quote of the Day

...beneath the shiny surface of apps and the “like” buttons of Instagram and Facebook, there exists what the philosopher Slavoj Žižek calls the “obscene underside,” a murky world where we fall in love with our computers... Clint Burnham, Professor, Department of English, Simon Fraser University

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  3. The Tony Clement scandal shows all texting is sexting
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  5. Pioneering sociologist foresaw our current chaos 100 years ago

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