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Exploring the unique capacities of online events, instead of trying to replicate in-person conventions, will yield the best results. (Shutterstock)

How to plan successful e-conferences

Rocks painted with the message “every child matters,” commemorate Orange Shirt Day, Sept. 30, about creating meaningful discussion about the effects of Residential Schools and their legacy. (Province of British Columbia/Flickr)

Racism contributes to poor attendance in Alberta schools

Our educational systems should be doing more to ensure STEM classrooms are places where relevant inquiry pertaining to real-life issues thrives. (Flickr/Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for American Education: Images of Teachers and Students in Action)

STEM should engage students’ minds & hearts

A lone cyclist rides past the University of Toronto campus during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on June 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

COVID-19 stress raises risk of mental health crises in university students

University students had high rates of mental health issues before the pandemic. The additional stressors of COVID-19 and social isolation will make them even more vulnerable over the winter.
Will the pandemic influence schools’ return to practical skills traditionally gained through home economics? (Shutterstock)

Pandemic sewing surge is a chance to rediscover the practical arts

Some designers, makers and consumers are imploring us not to stop sewing after the pandemic because of the potential for utilitarian, psychological and environmental benefits.
Defunding of universities has forced administrators to to seek and secure private donations from wealthy individuals or corporations. Pictured here, the Michael G. De Groote Faculty of Medecine, McMaster University, in Hamilton, Ont.

Half of Ontario’s medical schools are now named after wealthy donors

We should challenge government defunding of universities, and greater reliance on private donations that can affect the transparency, equity and democracy of public institutions, including hospitals.
English language teachers should encourage students to draw on their own mother tongues. Here, children participate in learning to help Syrian refugee youths prepare for school at the H.appi Camp in Toronto, July 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Language learning should reflect ‘superdiverse’ communities

How we teach languages has not evolved much from the traditional grammar-based mode of instruction, and this approach alone marginalizes students' existing knowledge and communication abilities.
Ontario’s new financial literacy curriculum covers financial literacy, including budget-making, credit cards and compound interest. (Shutterstock)

6 changes in Ontario’s math curriculum

Ontario's new math curriculum was written by competent mathematicians relying on the latest research, and includes both coding and social-emotional learning.
Developmental language disorder may be missed as it often doesn’t appear foremost as a language impairment. (Shutterstock)

Reading struggles? It may be developmental language disorder

Developmental language disorder affects more than seven per cent of children, yet is not well known. If your child struggles in school, social interactions or reading, the underlying issue may be DLD.
Australia’s move to increase fees for some university humanities courses reflects global trends towards market-friendly education that overlook what’s needed for human flourishing. Here, the University of Sydney. (Eriksson Luo/Unsplash)

Stop pumping up STEM for the post-coronavirus world

Today's urgent inequality and environmental crises mean that more, not fewer, students should be studying history.
Many factors contributed to students’ need for personalized accommodation and support to achieve academically during rapid transitions online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Shutterstock

Improving equity & access in online learning

A study documents how universities' centres for teaching and learning are responding to helping faculty create quality online courses for all students.
As statues topple, business schools must begin seriously decolonizing. (Piqsels)

A call to decolonize business schools

Contemplating the future of the business school means we must decide what kind of society we want our students to create and what reforms are needed to enable them to do so.
Many people are wondering if COVID-19 could spell the end of university admission testing. Young people at the Autonomous University of Barcelona on July 7, 2020. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

University admissions tests are under scrutiny

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically accelerated a growing shift to test-optional admissions policies or scrapping entrance tests altogether.
Canada’s failure to fulfil its commitments to the UN Sustainable Development Goals will leave our children worse off. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Canada’s track record on children worsening

The COVID-19 pandemic risks making Canada's already woeful record on child welfare worse. To safeguard a future for our children, governments must prioritize their care.
Mentoring isn’t just good for the person on the receiving end. New research suggests those who serve as mentors benefit too. (Unsplash)

How mentoring improves leadership skills

Research suggests mentoring can be used to improve leadership skills among both junior and senior members of any organization.
Schools across Canada are using different methods to try to stop the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Doing the math on reducing COVID-19 outbreaks in schools

School boards across the country are using different measures to stop the spread of COVID-19. A new study suggests rotating students during different times at school could be most effective.
One-year-old Quentin Brown is held by his mother, Heather Brown, as he eyes a swab while being tested for COVID-19 at a new walk-up testing site at Chief Sealth High School in Seattle on Aug. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

6 tips to prepare your child for easy COVID-19 testing

Child health psychologists offer research-based strategies to prepare kids for pain-free and distress-free COVID-19 testing.
Mathematical models can help figure out class sizes and configurations to minimize disruptions and school closures. (Shutterstock)

Large class sizes during the coronavirus pandemic are a triple whammy

Schools reopening during the current coronavirus pandemic need to calculate class sizes to prevent the spread of disease and minimize disruptions.
Five-year-old Maverick Denette, left, and his six-year-old sister Peyton, centre, talk with a teacher at St. Thomas More Elementary School in Mississauga, Ont., Sept. 9, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Strong relationships help kids catch up after school closures

The approach that schools take to addressing how to get students caught up in learning they missed due to COVID-19 school closures may have a lasting impact on this generation.
Six-year-old Peyton Denette works remotely from her home in Mississauga, Ont., on March 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

5 ways to support online homeschooling through COVID-19

Motivating students, encouraging their self-regulation and maintaining home-school communication are ways parents have the potential to positively influence learning outcomes.

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