The Second Cup Ltd. says it is actively reviewing locations in Ontario for potential conversion to cannabis stores in light of a decision by the new provincial government to allow private retailers to sell the drug. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Cannabis with your coffee in Ontario?

President Donald Trump tosses paper towels into a crowd at Calvary Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico in October 2017 following Hurricane Maria. Trump congratulated Puerto Rico for escaping the higher death toll of “a real catastrophe like Katrina.” A new study suggests almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Disputing disaster death tolls

Why isn’t sustainability a part of accounting training? (Shutterstock)

Time to train accountants in sustainability

Despite the leaders of both countries being champions of fighting climate change, research shows both Canada and France are failing to train their accountants in sustainability. Why?
The ongoing NAFTA renegotiations could put a Canadian national pharmacare program in jeopardy, and could have a particular impact on Canadians who need expensive arthritis drugs. (Shutterstock)

NAFTA negotiations may threaten pharmacare

The ongoing NAFTA renegotiations could put a Canadian national pharmacare program in jeopardy, and have a particular impact on Canadians who need expensive arthritis drugs. Here's how.
Mexico, Canada and the United States are struggling to agree on new NAFTA terms. Reuters/Rebecca Cook

Lobbyists to ensure Canada stays in NAFTA

A political scientist explains why corporate lobbyists and other interest groups will thwart Trump's efforts to strong-arm or ignore Canada.
Improved access to Canada’s dairy market for American producers is one of the key unresolved NAFTA issues. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Two key issues to bring Canada back into NAFTA

Canada and the United States are back at the table to try to save NAFTA negotiations. Two key issues need to be resolved.
Ride-hailing services have gone global, and even women in Saudi Arabia – only recently given the right to drive – are getting in on the action. In this June 2018 photo, a female driver for Careem, a regional ride-hailing Uber competitor, is seen behind the wheel. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Where is Canada’s Uber?

Canada is simply a consumer of ride-hailing services, and has not established any of its own Ubers or Lyfts, even as tiny countries like Estonia get in on the game. That needs to change.
The national flags of Canada, from left, the U.S. and Mexico, are lit by stage lights before a news conference at the start of North American Free Trade Agreement renegotiations in Washington. But Canada’s status is now unsure after the U.S. and Mexico announced progress on a bilateral deal. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

NAFTA: Two’s company, three’s a crowd?

An announcement that the United States and Mexico were close to a new trade deal came as a surprise to many. How did Canada become an afterthought during the NAFTA negotiations?
In this April 2017 photo, Wisconsin dairy farmer Tim Prosser is seen with his cows. Canada’s tough stance on diafiltered milk via its supply-management system has caused hardship for farmers like Prosser, forced to consider selling their milking cows and shutting down family businesses. (AP Photo/Cara Lombardo)

How the dairy lobby has cheesed off Trump

Canadian dairy farmers were already well-heeled and well-protected from world market forces, but their cash grab over something called diafiltered milk has put the entire Canadian economy at risk.
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No quick or easy resolution to the Trans Mountain pipeline question

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
Trump celebrates a tentative deal to replace NAFTA with advisors and Mexican counterparts. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

Tentative US-Mexico deal puts pressure on Canada

The US and Mexico announced a bilateral trade deal that pointedly excludes Canada. A economic law expert explains what it means.
Research among Canadians shows employment to be a critical social determinant of health, partly because those who earn higher wages have more access to safe housing, nutritious foods, social services and medical care. (Shutterstock)

Precarious jobs threaten health of millennials

No longer can young people invest in their education and work their way into secure employment. The health impacts of this job insecurity are profound.
Calgary beat out Vancouver on this year’s most livable city index issued by the Economist magazine. Flickr

Canada’s most livable city is…Calgary

Vancouver lost out to Calgary as Canada's most livable city this year. Why? Is it the high cost of housing or is it the city's 'neighbourhood first' method that sometimes creates business instability?
The Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent sails past a iceberg in Lancaster Sound in 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The Arctic isn’t prepared for more shipping traffic

New shipping opportunities are opening up in the Arctic as sea ice continues to recede. But travel is still dangerous and the region isn't equipped to deal with more vessel traffic.
Edmonton’s new NHL arena opened in 2016 and was partially funded by $226 million from the City of Edmonton. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Secrecy in deals for sports stadiums

The Calgary Flames are the latest pro sports team asking for public funds for a new arena. Cities across North America help fund sports facilities, but with little transparency and accountability
Protesters opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline extension demonstrate in Vancouver in June 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Trans Mountain: Everyone needs to chill

The ruling against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline project doesn't mean the end of the oil and gas industry in Canada. Other projects and approaches could go forward.
The financial system is awash with money, which is why interest rates have been so low for so long. (Shutterstock)

How banks have set a trap for the U.S. Fed

It's been 10 years since the U.S. signed into law a scheme to print money, essentially, and save the financial sector amid the sub-prime mortgage meltdown. Did it work? And who's truly benefitted?
Farm-to-school programs aim to bring healthy, local food into schools, foster food literacy and enhance community connectedness (Shutterstock)

Farm-to-school’ movement takes root in Canada

New research will examine how the emerging farm-to-school movement can support local food systems, as well as providing healthy lunches for children.
Vic Fedeli, Ontario’s finance minister, and Attorney General Caroline Mulroney talk to the media after announcing Ontario’s cannabis retail model on Aug. 13. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Ontario uproots its plans for selling weed

Ontario’s change to private sector cannabis stores will give consumers more convenience. That will mean stronger competition against the black market, but potentially higher consumption too.
Technology and artificial intelligence are already profoundly changing how we live, work and travel. Are we ready for more profound changes? (Shutterstock)

Are we ready for the digital tsunami?

Technology is already changing how we live our lives and go about our days. Are we ready with collaborative planning processes so we are not taken by surprise by more profound change?
A few woefully underfunded academic health sciences centres are responsible for providing complex care to patients with life-threatening illnesses as well as training future doctors and testing the latest in new surgical techniques. (Shutterstock)

Why we need academic health science centres

Canada's systems of health funding, medical training and physician compensation need an overhaul – to support vital centres of medical research and complex care.

Editor's Picks

More

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. For millennials, employment is a public health challenge
  2. Cannabis with your coffee? Ontario could have thousands of pot retailers
  3. Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions
  4. How the dairy lobby’s cash grab put Canada in Trump’s crosshairs
  5. What exactly is neoliberalism?

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 72,800 academics and researchers from 2,520 institutions.

Register now