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French-language advocates protest Air Canada’s chief executive Michael Rousseau’s inability to speak French in front of the airline’s head office during a demonstration in Montréal. The sign reads: “Rousseau Get Out.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Corporate leadership: Tone at the top has moral consequences

A woman and children who were stranded by high water due to flooding are rescued by a volunteer operating a boat in Abbotsford, B.C., in November 2021. The Insurance Institute of Canada forecasts that annual insured losses from natural disasters could increase to $5 billion within the next 10 years. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Insurance isn’t enough: We must do better on natural disaster resilience

Birds fly over a man taking photos of the exposed riverbed of the Old Parana River, a tributary of the Parana River during a drought in Rosario, Argentina, in July 2021. The Global South is being hit hard by climate change, but could business help turn the tide? (AP Photo/Victor Caivano)

Global business could be the unexpected solution to climate change

The goal of the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero, or GFANZ, is to bring together the financial sector to accelerate the transition to a net-zero economy. Here’s why it might actually work.
Our grandparents had it easy when it came to time management — society, social norms, business operations and institutions helped them manage their time. Now it’s up to us. (Ono Kosuki, Piqsels)

Time management has become harder — and we should be grateful

It’s no secret that time management has become harder than ever. But it’s not because we work more, or that life is getting faster.
The ongoing construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, near Kamloops, B.C., in September 2021. China’s clean energy plans could create problems for Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

What China’s plans to decarbonize its economy mean for Canada’s energy exports

Canada has neglected to keep up with China’s climate politics, putting the future of the country’s fossil fuel exports at risk.
Learning to create value in environments of uncertainty with limited resources is something that can help all young people build their futures, especially amid the uncertainty of COVID-19. (Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa)

Entrepreneurship learning: All university students can benefit

A study of entrepreneurship activity at 27 universities in Canada showed an increased interest in co-op work terms where students could work in their own start-up.
U.S. President Joe Biden shakes hands with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they meet in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How Canada should address U.S. protectionism

Amid another flurry of U.S. protectionist measures, Canada should reconsider the value of global trade deals over bilateral agreements. But it should also support its own industries.
Cannabis is a complex plant, ideally labelling of cannabis products should accurately reflect the combinations of psychoactive ingredients present in a strain. (Shutterstock)

Indica, sativa labels are largely meaningless when it comes to cannabis

Cannabis labelling is often misleading. Labelling cannabis products with quantities of key compounds will help consumers make informed decisions.
The shift away from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles is not a normal retooling of auto plants, but a full-scale recreation of the auto sector that will reshape the modern economy. Will Canada’s auto sector be left in the wilderness? (Marcin Jozwiak/Pexels)

Canada must once again grab its share of the auto industry

A look back at how Canada secured auto investment in the past shows how a peripheral economy gained a major auto sector — and how it might hold onto it even in the face of U.S. protectionism on EVs.
A house in Ottawa that sold over the listing price. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Want to solve the housing crisis? Address super-charged demand

More housing supply doesn’t mean lower prices. If policy-makers want to make homes more affordable, they must tackle developers who drive up prices and consider taxing capital gains on homes.
Today’s workers are rejecting management hierarchies and want more autonomy and teamwork. (Pexels)

Management is passé — it’s co-creation workers want

Employees are demanding a more human-centric workplace, with space for trust and vulnerability. Management is over. The era of co-creation is underway.
Media coverage of public health advisories has caused anxiety in many citizens who may deem tourism activities too risky during the pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Canadians need to put travel risk into perspective

Now that restrictions are lifting and leisure travel is resuming, we need to be reminded that travel has positive effects on our health and wellness.
Legislation on the right to disconnect sounds promising. But does it really address why workers are putting in so many hours long after their work day should be done? (Victoria Heath/Unsplash)

Right to disconnect doesn’t tackle real work issues

The right to disconnect can be the catalyst an organization needs to review its workplace policies. But what’s really needed is a cultural shift that gives workers more control over how they work.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote address talking up his latest passion – creating a virtual reality “metaverse” for business, entertainment and meaningful social interactions. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Facebook’s rebranding is anything but ‘meta’

To be meta about Meta would involve reflecting upon the fact that Facebook is a company that designs technology around people.
As governments depend on multinational consulting firms not just for advice on COVID-19 but for core policy-making functions, we should question the extent to which such partnerships have really augmented government capacities — or hollowed them out. (Shutterstock)

Consulting firms are the ‘shadow public service’ managing COVID-19

Since the beginning of the pandemic, governments in Canada have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on outside consulting firms like McKinsey, Deloitte and EY with almost no public oversight.
Gov. Gen. Mary Simon delivers the throne speech in the Senate as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, and her husband Whit Fraser look on. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Inflation could crowd out political agenda for years

Inflation rates are rising around the world due to pandemic-related pressures. What does it mean for the federal government in the months and years ahead? The throne speech didn’t offer many clues.

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