Markham Thunder players celebrate winning the 2018 Clarkson Cup final as champions of the Canadian Women’s Hockey League. The CWHL has announced it will cease operations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Donovan

Death of CWHL presents new opportunities

Homeless camps like this one in downtown Nanaimo, B.C., photographed in 2018 can be seen all over North America. THE CANADIAN PRESS Jonathan Hayward

The aging face of homelessness in North American cities

The number of seniors experiencing homelessness in Vancouver has increased in recent years, according to the city’s Homeless Count.
Voice-enabled searches are becoming increasingly popular when it comes to web browsing, and that’s a problem for the food industry. (Shutterstock)

Hey Siri! Why are food retailers are slow to adopt technology?

According to a recent report, 30 per cent of web-browsing sessions will soon be done without a screen. Voice-enabled searches are becoming the norm, and that's a problem for the food industry.
In this April 2013 file photo, Bangladeshi rescue workers search for victims amid the rubble of a collapsed building in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A new study shows a gender gap in how female and male business students viewed the role that business played in the disaster. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

How current and future business executives link sustainability and global strife

In a recent survey, Alberta business students believed that sustainability should be embedded in business education. That could signal a shift in views on the integration of profit, planet and people.
A customer holds up his receipt after being the first person to buy cannabis at the SpiritLeaf cannabis store in Kingston, Ont., on April 1, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Feds are blowing smoke about pot supplies

Federal officials have repeatedly claimed cannabis supplies are sufficient. But their own data suggest otherwise.
Governments worry that medical cannabis tax exemptions could tempt recreational users. Some might seek prescriptions to save money. Eliminating taxes on medical purchases of only cannabis oil could work as a compromise. (Shutterstock)

Most Canadians still use black market pot

With cannabis, governments must balance taxing legal sales versus competing with illegal ones.
The one-person household is one of the fastest growing demographics in our country. (Shutterstock)

The food industry & single-person households

By 2025, Canada’s population could include five million people who live alone. Those who live alone tend to cook less, but the food industry has plans for them.
Canadian bank notes are seen in this 2017 photo. Ottawa finances deficit spending by borrowing money. Twenty per cent of the money is borrowed from the Bank of Canada. In other words, the government borrows that money from itself. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Federal Budget

How government deficits fund private savings

Critics complain that government debt saddles future generations with a financial burden. The critics are wrong.
Canadians, like many other people around the world, are stressing about money and have amassed a lot of credit-card debt. (Shutterstock)

Escape the paycheque-to-paycheque cycle

People are stressed out about money, with most of us struggling to make ends meet due to abusing credits cards and amassing consumer debt. Some tips on how to change your spending behaviour.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau participates in TV interviews after tabling his budget, which included a $595 million financial package for news organizations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Federal budget

Research says journalists’ loyalties are tough to buy

The federal budget has offered several initiatives to help Canada's ailing news industry. Does that mean journalists will be compromised by government handouts? New research suggests they won't.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau being interviewed after delivering a budget that promised financial aid for journalism. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Federal budget

Government funding for journalism: To what end?

The newspaper industry has been asking the federal government for financial assistance for years. Now that Ottawa has revealed its plan, what purpose will it serve to sustain news organizations?
Because male migrants earn more money to send back home than females, families in some post-communist countries are strongly tempted to use sex-selective abortion to improve their lives. Johann Walter Bantz/Unsplash

Breeding young men for export in poor countries

Breeding young men for export has never been a successful economic development strategy. Policies that improve local labour market opportunities could increase the status of women.
Surviving an extinction-level event requires adapting to a new environment. Shutterstock

Dinosaurs & the future of work

As artificial intelligence increasingly intersects with our work and personal lives, we will need to adapt to survive in this new reality.
These photovoltaics panels provide this village with energy now, but they could become obsolete when the main grid arrives. (Shutterstock)

The future of renewable infrastructure is uncertain without good planning

Small-scale renewable energy projects can power rural areas not connected to the main grid. But investors may hesitate if future electrification remains unpredictable.
Former SNC-Lavalin vice-president Stephane Roy leaves a Quebec courtroom after fraud and bribery charges against him were thrown out due to trial delays. Roy had been charged with bribing a foreign public official in connection with the company’s dealings with Libya. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

SNC-Lavalin shows foreign corruption laws need review

Until recently, paying a bribe or kickback to secure a contract abroad was seen as the cost of doing business in a foreign land. The SNC-Lavalin case has underscored the need to rethink the approach.
The Padma Bridge Project in Bangladesh is seen in this February 2018 photograph. SNC-Lavalin was accused of bribing officials in the construction of the bridge, though charges were later dropped. Md Shaifuzzaman Ayon

SNC-Lavalin decisions affect people in the world’s poorest countries

Promoting Canadian jobs is part of any government’s political mandate, but so too is the responsibility of ensuring that Canadian businesses are not supporting or condoning corruption abroad.
A forest fire rages in California in November 2018. AP Photo/Noah Berger

Climate change & a global financial crisis

Increasingly severe losses for insurers due to climate change could result in a global financial crisis.
Is the SNC-Lavalin controversy truly a political scandal? If so, it’s unlike any we’ve seen before in Canada. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seen here in January 2019 with Jody Wilson-Raybould after she was shuffled out of her job as attorney general. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Is the SNC-Lavalin controversy truly a scandal?

A standard political scandal involves a person who did something wrong out of negligence or motivations of money, personal ambition, sex, etc. But the SNC-Lavalin affair so far lacks those elements.

Editor's Picks

More

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Earth Day: Colonialism’s role in the overexploitation of natural resources
  2. A taxing problem: Canadian cities desperately need new sources of revenue
  3. Here’s what the carbon tax means for you
  4. Canada’s approach to lunar exploration needs to be strategic or we’ll be left behind
  5. What exactly is neoliberalism?

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 83,000 academics and researchers from 2,819 institutions.

Register now