The commitment of vegan businesses to animal welfare is laudable, but are they being sheep in their labour practices by doing things the old way? Researchers are asking questions about their labour standards and commitment to social justice. (Shutterstock)

It’s not business as usual for vegan businesses

No one really knows for certain what the market potential is for cannabis, much less for edibles, but growth opportunities are palatable. (Shutterstock)

The trouble with edibles

Workers produce medical marijuana at Canopy Growth Corporation’s Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ont., in February 2018. The company wants a a “greenhouse outlet” to sell its products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces prepare to push pot

In this Nov. 12, 2017 file photo, participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Lawmakers are expected to take up bills to crack down on sexual harassment when they return from their summer recess in August 2018. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes,file)

Eight ways to bring #MeToo to a workplace

A 1792 painting by artist James Gillray portrays the Macartney Embassy mission to China, when the British ambassador was rebuffed by the emperor after offering western goods. There are parallels in Chinese history to Donald Trump’s isolationism. British Museum/1868,0808.6228

Lessons in Chinese history as U.S. shuts off

A different decision from the Supreme Court of Canada on inter-provincial trade barriers could have, among other things, finally forced politicians to deal with the country’s problematic supply management system for the dairy and poultry sectors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Just $292.50 to transform Canadian agrifood

The Gérard Comeau case was never just about beer. It was essentially about enabling Canada's domestic economy across the country to thrive. Here's how the Supreme Court of Canada got it so wrong.
The future of local news is sobering but not without some measure of hope. By illuminating both the values and challenges besetting local journalism, we can reimagine a new day for local news. (Shutterstock)

Can local news be saved?

Local news is in peril. Here's what can be done to save it.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford, seen here walking on the front lawn of the Ontario Legislature in June, is vowing to deliver on his campaign promise to scrap the “disastrous” cap-and-trade system and fight a federal carbon tax. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Taxpayers will back a carbon tax if they get a cheque in the mail

Ontario and Saskatchewan are vociferously fighting the federal government's carbon tax efforts. But rather than back down, Ottawa should embrace a simple, fair and transparent “carbon dividend.”
As consumers shift to online shopping and new businesses increasingly focus investments on digital products and services, governments around the world need to update old tax rules to avoid losing tax revenue. (Shutterstock)

The importance of a U.S. Supreme Court tax ruling

As Canada’s federal government sends mixed signals on digital taxation, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a historic precedent and paves the way for other countries to tackle the digital economy.
Genetic ancestry testing might all seem like harmless fun, but there is a downside. (Shutterstock)

The truth about ancestry tests

The results of genetic ancestry tests are grossly over-simplified. A new study shows the tests reinforce what you want to believe rather than offering objective, scientific proof of who you are.
U.S. President Donald Trump left the recent G7 summit in a fury about Justin Trudeau and vowing an escalated trade war. Canadians are responding by going Trump-free at the grocery stores – but it will likely be short-lived. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Canadians are going Trump-free – for now

Every now and then, Canadians will take a stand against the U.S. by choosing Canadian items over American ones at the grocery store. Unless they cost more -- and most often, they do.
The transformative nature of our move to a data-driven economy and society means that any data strategy will have long-lasting effects. That’s why the Canadian government needs to ask the right questions to the right people in its ongoing national consultations. (Shutterstock)

Why you need more say on data consultations

The Canadian government is right to hold public consultations on digital and data transformation given how profoundly it affects society at large. But the scope is far too narrow.
Gas prices usually rise heading into long weekends. The reasons behind wild oil price fluctuations, reflected at the pumps, is about a lot more than economics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The rollercoaster ride of oil prices

Oil prices have little to do with supply or demand or even economic forces. Instead, it's all about politics.
The Canadian government recently approved the sale of genetically modified golden rice that’s fortified with Vitamin A. It’s an example of a GM food that directly benefits consumers. Josep Folta/Flickr

Showing consumers the benefits of GMO foods

Why are consumers so reluctant to embrace genetically modified foods? A new study suggests agricultural biotech companies are failing to show consumers a personal benefit to buying GM foods.
U.S. President Donald Trump, seen here in a February 2018 photo, has a beef with trade deficits. Yet running trade deficits with Asian countries has long spurred American spending and consumption. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump’s odd aversion to trade deficits

Donald Trump's obsession with trade deficits, and his subsequent wielding of the tariff big guns, is the absolute wrong approach for the U.S. economy.
Diary farmer Chris Ryan and his cow Ninja take part in a protest on Canada’s Parliament Hill in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trade war

Canada should stop defending dairy products

Canada's protectionist stance on dairy products has attracted the ire of Donald Trump. The U.S. president raises legitimate points about a system that costs Canadians at home and abroad.
Plans for a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor, Ont., named after hockey great Gordie Howe, will increase the flow of goods between Canada and the U.S. But Canada’s current trade war with the United States means the country should diversify its economy by relying less on its southern neighbour. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley

Canada must find new global markets

Is Canada ready for a scenario where the North American Free Trade Agreement is scrapped? The tense negotiations with the United States are a chance for Canada to diversify its trade partnerships.
Giving a TED talk and/or tweeting are becoming expected parts of an up-and-coming digital professor’s job. (William Saito)

The professor of the future: Digital and critical

Young professors are challenged to engage in public outreach using digital technologies, without becoming mouthpieces for corporate elites.
Executive pay is an issue that often causes public uproar. But it’s not as greed-driven as we might think. Razvan Chisu/Unsplash

CEO pay uproar isn’t entirely warranted

High CEO compensation angers the public, particularly when it doesn't seemed tied to performance. But as a whole, trends in executive compensation are consistent with fundamental economic forces.
Millennials dream of home ownership. In expensive cities like Toronto and Vancouver, they’re saving up to buy homes by living with their parents or taking on tenants once they save up enough to buy. (Shutterstock)

How millennials are managing to buy homes

Canada's millennials want to own homes in the country's most expensive cities, Toronto and Vancouver. Here's how they're managing to do so, but is it sustainable?
Protesters demonstrate against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in May 2018 in Vancouver. Building infrastructure is a tricky business for the private and public sector alike. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The risky business of government-run pipelines

When the Canadian government announced its pending ownership in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, it entered the complex business of pipeline infrastructure.
Management academics often face students in their classrooms with more practical experience in the business world than they have. But management is an important inter-disciplinary field that has a lot to offer business executives. (Shutterstock)

Why management academics matter

Those who study, research and teach management are often viewed skeptically, even by their students, who might have more experience than they do in the business world. Here's why that's wrong.
Canadians are spending more of their money on restaurants. In turn, restaurants have an impact on what we eat at home. (Shutterstock)

Restaurants shape our food preferences

Restaurants are playing an increasingly influential role in how we live. We not only patronize them more often, they also influence our choices at the grocery store.
Cattle that are grass-fed, antibiotic- and growth hormone-free gather at a farm in Oregon in 2015. There’s a debate over whether antibiotic use in livestock makes germs more resistant to the drugs, and results in infections being passed on to humans who consume the meat. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

Reducing antibiotics in farm animals isn’t easy

The use of antibiotics in raising livestock is complex. We could be moving towards a less-than-ideal result due to poor understanding, over-simplistic messaging and a rush for competitive advantage.

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