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To adapt to changing consumer habits during COVID-19, small retailers in Canada have offered services like home delivery and curbside pickup. They may need to continue those practices in the post-pandemic era. (Maarten van den Heuvel/Unsplash)

How retailers are dealing with changing consumer habits

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a rally protesting the electoral college certification of Joe as president on Jan. 6, 2021, in which he successfully incited a mob to storm Congress. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump’s narcissism may have changed leadership forever

Donald Trump's narcissism and destructive style of leadership may influence organizational leaders who were impressed by what he was able to get away with during his four years as president.
The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto. After the SARS pandemic in 2003, Toronto hotels faced a recovery period. (Shutterstock)

SARS didn’t prepare the hospitality industry for the impact of COVID-19

After SARS in 2003, an effort was made by Toronto's tourism and hospitality industries to stimulate the sector's recovery. But measures weren't put in place for future pandemics.
Getting vaccines to rural and hard-to-reach areas is critical for public health and ethical reasons. Hector Roqueta Rivero/Moment via Getty Images

The cold supply chain can’t reach everywhere – that’s a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use need to be kept frozen. But there are many places in the world that can't support a cold supply chain.
In this August 2020 photo, travellers request an Uber ride at Los Angeles International Airport. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

California’s gig worker battle reveals the abuses of precarious work

Proposition 22 keeps workers for app-based companies like Uber and Lyft classified as independent contractors, but it also reveals deeper problems with contemporary labour markets.
Presenteeism – as opposed to absenteeism – is especially dangerous in the midst of a pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Employers need to give paid sick days to fight the coronavirus

Presenteeism — when employees show up for work when they're sick — at a time of a global pandemic is especially dangerous for co-workers, managers and employers.
Plant-based alternative foods have grown in popularity, but it’s important to read the labels to know if they’re healthy. (Shutterstock)

6 things to know about eating plant-based foods

Plant-based diets can be healthy but ingredients matter. Heavily processed meat substitutes can be high in saturated fats and sodium.
Farmers, cottagers and small business organizations are among the groups clamouring for better broadband in Ontario, especially in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Pexels)

Building back better with faster broadband

The need for much-improved internet connectivity exists across Canada. Will the Ontario government's recent announcement of $1 billion and the federal government's announcement of the Universal Broadband Fund of $1.75 billion for improved broadband be enough to make a difference?
Now might be a perfect time to involve children in discussions about saving money and encourage them to practice making their own saving decisions. (Shutterstock)

Teaching saving and spending to young kids

The act of choosing to save or spend money often involves considering a future point in time. Greater focus on saving and budgeting can help children better develop saving skills.
A person wears a protective face mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as they walk past the emergency department of the Vancouver General Hospital on Nov. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Save the economy? Start by vanquishing COVID

Saving the economy requires minimizing, if not eliminating, community COVID-19 transmission.
The Neskantaga First Nation has had a boil-water advisory in place for 26 years. (Dayna Nadine Scott)

Mining push continues on First Nations

Infrastructure for the mining industry has been prioritized over community-infrastructure for essential human needs.
The Paris Agreement on climate change, signed on Dec. 12, 2015, by almost 200 states, was hailed as the turning point to keep global warming in check. Progress, however, has been insufficient. (UNclimate change/flickr)

Paris Agreement at 5: Getting the world back on track

The Paris Agreement set countries on a path to limit global warming. Five years on, some progress has been made, but not enough. Decarbonizing the economy will take leadership and imagination.
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland gets a fist bump from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after delivering the 2020 fiscal update in the House of Commons on Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How the fiscal update fell short on climate and income inequality

The pace of federal government action to date does not align with the urgency of the twin climate and inequality crises. The latest fiscal update doesn't go far enough on either crisis.
Good governance is critical for growth. But Canadian startups haven’t yet got a handle on the importance of governance when seeking investors. (Ravi Roshan/Unsplash)

Canadian startups need to focus on corporate governance to thrive

Good business requires good governance, and startups require a particular kind of governance to help them grow and prosper. That's why it's so important for startups to get governance right early on.
Canada’s tech sector, in particular, is in need of highly skilled tech workers if it’s to maintain momentum. (ukblacktech.com)

COVID-19 disrupting migration of new talent

To ensure foreign workers continue to view Canada as a place to live and work, the government must find a way to keep borders open to all workers essential to the post-pandemic economic recovery.
Dollarama worker Ze Carole Benedict, originally from Cameroon, addresses a demonstration in Montréal in August 2020 to join in calls for higher pay and better working conditions amid COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Immigrant women falling behind during COVID-19

Urgent measures are necessary from various levels of government to develop support programs for immigrant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The Supreme Court of Canada’s recent decision has put a halt to any legal claims that there’s no difference between corporations and people. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

SCOC dismisses cruel & unusual punishment claim

The Supreme Court of Canada's recent ruling against a company that claimed a fine against it constituted cruel and unusual punishment will quell fears of weakening corporate law.
In order to contain a deadly virus, the COVID Alert app needs to go viral. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Have you installed the COVID Alert app?

Ironically, to encourage people to download the COVID Alert app, we need viral processes as we attempt to contain an actual virus. And that's a challenge when we're socially isolated.
United States Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris speaks on Nov. 24, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The world needs more women leaders — during COVID-19 and beyond

Gender parity leads to collaboration and a blending of visions, and paves the way for the adoption of more comprehensive and inclusive solutions than if they're conceived from only one perspective.

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