Will Donald Trump peacefully vacate the Oval Office if he loses the presidential election in 2020? The American 1800 election showed that peaceful transitions of power are the result of choices made by individuals. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Would Trump concede in 2020? A lesson from 1800

A letter to leaders of Canada’s political parties signed by 1200 academics with expertise in health care calls for parties to commit to a national pharmacare plan. (Shutterstock)

The case for national pharmacare

1909 image of a sugar mill, Barbados - a Caribbean island with a history of many colonial slavery laws. Allister Macmillan/W.H. and L. Collingridge/Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

U.S. white nationalism roots & Barbados

Many parents feel compelled to pay school fees, even while they feel they shouldn’t have to. (Shutterstock)

School fees undermine equity

Some parents in Québec are being reimbursed after a ruling that they were overcharged school fees. If taxes cover public schools, should parents have to pay at all?
1909 image of a sugar mill, Barbados - a Caribbean island with a history of many colonial slavery laws. Allister Macmillan/W.H. and L. Collingridge/Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

The roots of U.S. white nationalism in Barbados

The vicious ideology that allegedly drove a gunman to kill 22 people in El Paso, Texas last week could be traced back to a tiny island on the eastern fringe of the Caribbean Sea
Women dance during a protest march against the killing of activists, in Bogota, Colombia, on July 26, 2019. Colombians took to the streets to call for an end to a wave of killings in the wake of the nation’s peace deal. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)

El Grito: Violence in Colombia continues to kill activists

In Colombia, a 2016 peace agreement does not contain the ongoing violence. Violence escalates as criminal armed groups replace the FARC rebels in a violent battle for land and resources.
Indian paramilitary soldiers stand guard on a deserted street during curfew in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir, Aug. 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

India’s colossal blunder in Kashmir

Violence, rebellion, dark days and a war with Pakistan are likely on the horizon as a result of India's latest move against Kashmiris.
An Indian paramilitary soldier checks the bag of a Kashmiri man during curfew in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir. The lives of millions in India’s only Muslim-majority region have been upended recently. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

Call the crime in Kashmir what it is: Genocide

While the world avoids calling the crime by its name, Kashmiris are facing an ongoing genocide.
Paramilitary soldiers walk past Rapid Action Force (RAF) soldiers standing guard during security lockdown in Jammu, India, Aug. 9, 2019. The restrictions on public movement throughout Kashmir have forced people to stay indoors. All communications and the internet have been cut off. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Modi ushers in new, intolerant India

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he's ushering in a 'new India.' But this new era is of ethnic majoritarianism and erases differences, dissent and the rights of minorities.
Meal-time in Kashmir is a time of dialogue. Omer Aijazi

War stories from the Kashmiri kitchen

As Kashmir faces new challenges, our forms of allyship must also evolve. Perhaps we can learn some lessons from its kitchens.
People participate in the 2016 Trans Pride March in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Eduardo Lima

Transgender hate crimes on the rise in Canada

A recent report on crime statistics leaves out transgender and nonbinary folk. A security and surveillance expert says this invisibility is harmful. Without stats, we cannot counter violence.
Canadian leaders face high-stakes decisions about 5G technology. In this June 26, 2019, photo, visitors tour the Huawei pavilion at the Mobile World Congress in Shanghai, China. (Chinatopix via AP)

Canada will antagonize either the U.S. or China with 5G decision

The place of Huawei in Canada's 5G network, and the associated national security implications, will be a key issue for the next federal government.
A sign of how historical #MeToo felt in 2017 is this appearance by #MeToo founder Tarana Burke with TV personality Allison Hagendorf on stage at the New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square on Dec. 31, 2017, in New York. (Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)

#MeToo: Must sexual assault be denounced in public every time?

Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, says power and privilege can have a lot to do with who feels comfortable declaring #MeToo. Let's be aware of this power division.
In an attempt to address the growing problem of fake news online, an algorithm that identifies patterns in language may help distinguish between factual and inaccurate news articles. Shutterstock

How an algorithm can help us detect fake news

Using machine learning and natural language processing, researchers are developing an algorithm that can distinguish between real and fake news articles.
The U.S. women’s soccer team celebrates with the trophy after winning the World Cup final. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Big brands could solve sports’ gender pay gap

Women’s sports have been stuck in a boom-and-bust cycle for the past 20 years. It’s time to start a new narrative.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources fire rangers wade through floodwaters as they deploy pumps in Pembroke, Ont., in May 2019. Too many authorities involved in fighting flood risks can often paralyze flood management efforts. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Why it’s so hard to fight floods in Canada

Canadian history and international relations theory gives us perspective on why co-ordinating flood management has proven so difficult in Canada and what can be done about it.
Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball holds his granddaughter after winning the provincial election in May 2019. Young people are leaving the province for jobs and opportunities, but should still be allowed to vote in provincial elections. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Injecting youth into NL’s greying democracy

Extending the provincial vote to expatriates from Newfoundland and Labrador could make make for a more vibrant democracy.
Occasional voters don’t respond well to guilt trips when organizations try to encourage them to cast ballots. Research suggests other methods are more successful. Unsplash

Encouraging the occasional voter

Encouraging people to vote involves changing the discourse. Guilt trips are ineffective.
President Donald Trump visits the El Paso Regional Communications Center after meeting with people affected by the El Paso mass shooting, Aug. 7, 2019. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Why do we keep having debates about video-game violence?

Stop blaming video games for violent acts, a digital culture expert says. Instead, look to the link with public health to help us deal with a complicated culture of violence.
The relationship between guns and masculinity was once sanctioned by governments and businesses, making it entrenched and difficult to challenge. Kyle Johnson/Unsplash

Canada suggested guns turned boys into men

The relationship between guns and masculinity was once sanctioned by governments and businesses, making it entrenched and difficult to challenge.
Using data during election campaigns is nothing new. But as the Canadian federal election approaches, authorities must be diligent that data tracking doesn’t become surveillance. (Shutterstock)

Key questions about voter surveillance

Data analytics have played a role in elections for years. But today’s massive voter relationship management platforms use digital campaigning practices to take it to another level.

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