Mary Ng is hugged by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after being sworn in as Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion during a swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall on July 18, 2018. The cabinet shuffle sets the stage for the next federal election in the fall of 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trudeau’s cabinet shuffle patches holes before next election

Actors Luana Anders and Peter Fonda smoking a joint in a scene from the 1969 film ‘Easy Rider,’ a countercultural movie that influenced drug use by baby boomers in the 1960s. (Columbia Pictures)

How Canadian boomers got into pot

In 2016, the Ontario government promised the province’s schools would teach all students about residential schools and add more Indigenous perspectives into the provincial curriculum. The newly elected Conservative government has scrapped those plans. Library and Archives Canada

Ontario nixes plan to Indigenize curriculum

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a news conference after their meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland on July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Trump-Putin summit: Hired hand at work?

Is Donald Trump a pawn of Russia? A mini-blimp floating during anti-Trump protests in London depicts the president as a giant baby – just as he prepares to meet with Vladimir Putin. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Is Trump Putin’s ‘stooge?’

No one really knows for certain what the market potential is for cannabis, much less for edibles, but growth opportunities are palatable. (Shutterstock)

The trouble with edibles

Cannabis-infused food products could shake up the food industry.
Cities were once considered a source of many problems. But that vision has changed over the last generation. Graeme Roy

Our changing views of the city: A new urban celebration

Our current celebration of cities is a big shift from the past generation when cities were seen to contain all of our problems. Should we believe the hype? Are the new ideas equally problematic?
Elon Musk may be on the hot seat for political donations and slurs against a British cave rescuer in Thailand, but his offer to pay for water filters in Flint, Mich., is laudable. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Can Elon Musk fix Flint’s water?

If Elon Musk can help achieve safe drinking water more quickly for every home in Flint, Mich., then he should be lauded. Water is life.
Women gather outside of the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2013 to dance as a part of the One Billion Rising movement, a global campaign by women for women which calls for the an end to violence against women. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

A Canadian woman or girl is killed every other day

We tend to pay attention to mass killings and terrorism. But one girl or woman is killed every other day in Canada. If we identify that as terrorism, we might pay more attention and do something.
People walk on Leningradskaya street in Samara, Russia, 2017. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

How Russians see the U.S.

For example, 77 percent of Russians see Trump as 'self-centered.'
Faith Goldy, an alt-right champion who appeared in an interview on a white nationalist site, speaks outside Wilfrid Laurier Univesity in March 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hannah Yoon

How not to defend free speech

Free speech may protect offensive speech, but we degrade this central right when we see it as simply the right to offend, regardless of the impact on others.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford, seen here walking on the front lawn of the Ontario Legislature in June, is vowing to deliver on his campaign promise to scrap the “disastrous” cap-and-trade system and fight a federal carbon tax. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Taxpayers will back a carbon tax if they get a cheque in the mail

Ontario and Saskatchewan are vociferously fighting the federal government's carbon tax efforts. But rather than back down, Ottawa should embrace a simple, fair and transparent “carbon dividend.”
A different decision from the Supreme Court of Canada on inter-provincial trade barriers could have, among other things, finally forced politicians to deal with the country’s problematic supply management system for the dairy and poultry sectors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Just $292.50 could have transformed agrifood

The Gérard Comeau case was never just about beer. It was essentially about enabling Canada's domestic economy across the country to thrive. Here's how the Supreme Court of Canada got it so wrong.
Cape Town narrowly avoided “Day Zero,” but that doesn’t mean the city is resilient to future water shortages. (Pixabay)

What other cities can learn from Capetown

Cape Town faced down "Day Zero" earlier this year, but that doesn't mean its water system is resilient. Other cities should also take note.
Workers produce medical marijuana at Canopy Growth Corporation’s Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ont., in February 2018. The company wants a a “greenhouse outlet” to sell its products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces prepare to push pot

Provincially owned cannabis retailers have a lot to do before cannabis goes on sale in Canada on Oct 17.
The future of local news is sobering but not without some measure of hope. By illuminating both the values and challenges besetting local journalism, we can reimagine a new day for local news. (Shutterstock)

Can local news be saved?

Local news is in peril. Here's what can be done to save it.
Aug. 12, 2017: white nationalist demonstrators use shields as they guard the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

The 100-year-old rallying cry of ‘white genocide’

White supremacists push an agenda that have their followers believing they are in danger of extinction. But their 'race suicide' ideas are based on 100-year-old unscientific and racist research.
A date with destiny: Donald Trump and Anthony Kennedy. EPA/Jim Lo Scalzo

Battle lines drawn for Supreme Court fight

In 1987, Anthony Kennedy was nominated to end a titanic Supreme Court fight. Could his putative successor trigger another one?
Hamilton resident, Peter Khill, 28, admitted he shot Jon Styres but said he fired in self-defence, believing Styres was about to shoot him. A jury acquitted him last week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel

Erasing race, not racism, in Khill trial

A jury found Peter Khill not guilty of second-degree murder of Jonathan Styres, an Indigenous father of two. Questions about jury selection and the justice system are raised by one of the jury triers.
As consumers shift to online shopping and new businesses increasingly focus investments on digital products and services, governments around the world need to update old tax rules to avoid losing tax revenue. (Shutterstock)

The importance of a U.S. Supreme Court tax ruling

As Canada’s federal government sends mixed signals on digital taxation, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a historic precedent and paves the way for other countries to tackle the digital economy.
MIT’s experiment with a serial killing AI called Norman, based on Psycho’s Norman Bates, underscores the importance of ensuring we get it right when embedding AI with culture. MIT

What if MIT’s Norman and Amazon’s Alexa hooked up?

Artificial Intelligence is set to explode and, as a result, multiple versions of AI are bound to co-exist. It's time to influence its development into a truly pan-global cultural environment.

Editor's Picks

More

How we are different

10 reasons

Most Read past week

  1. Understanding the rollercoaster ride of oil prices
  2. Can Elon Musk fix Flint’s water?
  3. The Trump-Putin summit: Hired hand at work?
  4. Taxpayers will back a carbon tax if they get a cheque in the mail
  5. How not to defend free speech

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 10.7 million users, and reach of 38.2 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 70,200 academics and researchers from 2,438 institutions.

Register now