People protest gun violence outside the White House on Feb. 19 following the latest mass school shooting, this one in Florida. Like the teens and children who showed up at the White House and elsewhere to protest, Americans must rediscover themselves as a revolutionary people who are not afraid to start over. (Shutterstock)

U.S. gun violence is a symptom of a long historical problem

Indigenous community members are doing the work to situate Colten Boushie’s life and death within the colonial context, answering not if race was a factor, but how and why. Colten Boushie’s brother, Jace Boushie, looks on during a media event at the Battlefords Agency Tribal Chiefs office after a jury delivered a verdict of not guilty in the trial of Gerald Stanley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

Boushie & the colonialism of Canadian media

Ontario Conservative leadership candidate Patrick Brown addresses supporters in Toronto on Feb. 18. The former party leader resigned his position after sexual misconduct allegations, only to re-enter the race for his vacated position after refuting the allegations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Chaos and confusion for Ontario’s Conservatives

The Ontario PCs are reeling from the fallout of Patrick Brown's removal as leader in January and his subsequent return to the leadership race. Can the party pull it together in time for the June vote?
Most parents are unaware just how easily available ‘hardcore’ porn has become. Chepko Danil Vitalevich/Shutterstock.com

Parents need to start talking to their tweens about the risks of porn

While parents are growing more concerned about their children's easy access to porn, they often don't realize just how 'hardcore' and violent it has become and how early their kids are seeing it.
Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton concedes the 2016 presidential election. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

New study: Trump may owe victory to ‘fake news’

Yes, votes are cast based on many factors. But a new survey and analysis suggests that belief in fake news could have been decisive during the 2016 election.
A man walks through a greenhouse in October 2017 at a learning centre in Uganda where sustainable agriculture techniques, such as drought-resistant crops and tree planting, are taught. (AP Photo/Adelle Kalakouti)

Securing Africa’s sustainable food future

At present on the African continent, the politics of persuasion are especially consequential in the area of agri-food research and development.
Members of a North Korean delegation cheer while holding the unified Korea flag at the pairs figure skating free program at the Pyeonchang Winter Olympics on Feb. 15, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

The Olympic event where everyone loses

The International Olympic Committee has banished dopers from the Winter Games. Shame it hasn't treated North Korea, a noted human rights violator, with the same resolve.
Parents wait for news after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. AP/Joel Auerbach

Tighter security won’t stop school shootings

When school shootings take place, beefed up security is often seen as a solution. Experience shows, however, that school shootings stem from social factors that require a different response.
Attendees attend a candlelight vigil for the victims of a shooting at a Florida school. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

The American public has power over the gun business – why doesn’t it use it?

Advocates of gun control may despair in the wake of mass shootings like the one in Parkland, Florida, but the history of government support for the gun industry shows Americans have more sway than they think.
Media portrayals of mass murderers may do more harm than good. Atstock Productions/Shutterstock.com

The media’s portrayal of mass shooters

When mass shootings take place, the media rush to publish details on the suspect's background. But is that approach one that does more harm than good?
Workers produce medical marijuana at Canopy Growth Corporation’s Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ont. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Can government pot beat street weed?

In competing with Canada's black markets, legal cannabis has potential strengths and weaknesses. Most flow directly from governments' policy choices.
The controversial opinions of University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson have garnered interest around the world and have led to wide media exposure, including this interview with Britain’s Channel 4 News. Channel 4/YouTube

Jordan Peterson: Fake news philosopher?

Jordan Peterson is now a right-wing darling for his views on everything from transgender people, the #MeToo movement and political correctness on campus. But he's not saying anything new.
The controversial $12-billion sale of light armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia has embroiled Justin Trudeau’s government in controversy. The vehicle in question is shown here at a news conference at a General Dynamics facility in London, Ont., in 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Spowart

Canada’s checkered history of arms sales to human rights violators

Canada used to be more careful about selling arms to countries that practised human rights violations. What happened?
Haitian-Americans protest Donald Trump’s “shithole countries” remarks as they march in Miami on Jan. 12 to commemorate the eighth anniversary of the Haitian earthquake, (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Canadian data on immigrants from ‘shitholes’

U.S. President Donald Trump and his apologists might be surprised what the economic data says about immigrants who come to Canada from the so-called “shithole” countries.
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, seen here at the provincial legislature in January, is among politicians who have threatened to sue political foes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

A SLAPP in the face: Democracy suffers when politicians go to court

The trend of politicians suing other politicians is worrisome since it risks limiting free speech. But there's a solution at hand known as anti-SLAPP legislation.
Jean Chretien, then Canada’s attorney general, signs the proclamation repatriating Canada’s constitution while Queen Elizabeth II watches in Ottawa in April 1982. The Constitution includes Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the notwithstanding clause that allows provinces to opt out of adhering to the Charter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ron Poling

The sparsely used notwithstanding clause

The notwithstanding clause in Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seldom been used. But it's not totally gathering dust, and Quebec is hinting it might use it to defend its niqab law.
A seal trapped in a mat of plastic pollution. (Nels Israelson/Flickr)

A global plastics treaty could save our seas

Millions of tonnes of plastic garbage winds up in our oceans each year. Voluntary pledges haven't worked. It's time for Canada to advocate for an international plastics treaty.
A potato farmer works his fields in Prince Edward Island. The time has come for Canada to go beyond growing crops and raising livestock; it’s time to expand its agri-food sector and create its own beloved food products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Canada’s golden agri-food opportunity

Canada does well growing crops and raising livestock, but it's missed the boat in developing its own popular food brands. As preferences change, Canada has a chance to shine in the agri-food sector.
South Korea’s goalie Shin So-jung reacts after giving up a goal to Switzerland in the first game played by the combined Koreas women’s hockey team the 2018 Winter Olympics. Korea lost its opening game 8-0. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Player or pawn? Women’s hockey at the Olympics

The joint South Korean-North Korean women's Olympic hockey team has angered fans of the game and raised concerns about athlete morale. But the media spotlight is actually good for the game.
Prince Edward Island ranks first in Canada’s Early Childhood Report 2017; Nunavut scores lowest, devoting only 0.9 per cent of its budget to early childhood education. (Shutterstock)

Canada must invest more in early childhood education: new report

Schools across Canada should 'grow down' and offer two years of full-day preschool, according to a new report. This would allow mothers to work, improve child outcomes and reduce income inequality.

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