A man holds a sign that reads ‘Q-Nited We Stand’ during a gun-rights rally held in Seattle in 2018. The QAnon community has moved from the fringes of the internet to mainstream politics in less than three years. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

QAnon conspiracy theorists may be headed to Congress

People walk on the words ‘defund the police’ that was painted in bright yellow letters in downtown Washington, D.C., on June 7, 2020. The death of unarmed Black man George Floyd in Minneapolis sparked worldwide protests against police brutality. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Enshrining police body cameras into law

Protesters march on June 6, 2020, in New York. Demonstrations continue across the United States in protest of racism and police brutality, sparked by the May 25 death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Ragan Clark)

How police can identify and oust killer cops

There are currently at least four major calls to defund police forces in Canada. Here, hundreds of people participate in a Black Lives Matter demonstration in front of Saskatchewan’s Legislative Building in Regina on June 2, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Taylor

How to defund and reimagine policing

Airlines are risking alienating customers and permanent reputational damage due to their refusal to issue refunds after cancelling flights mid-coronavirus. (Pixabay)

Airlines should rethink refusal to refund passengers

Airlines seem largely unconcerned about the long-term implications of their refusal to issue refunds to passengers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and risk alienating customers permanently.
A young man wearing a face mask reading “Against” in Pushkin Square in Moscow to protest the constitutional amendments that extended Russian President Vladimir Putin’s tenure to 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Putin’s win means dark days ahead for Russia

A plebiscite to amend the Russian constitution was a way for Vladimir Putin to extend his presidency to 2036. But many questions about the vote could mean trouble for the Russian leader.
A patient is connected to an oxygen tank at the Afghan-Japan Communicable Disease Hospital for COVID-19 patients in Kabul, Afghanistan, in June 2020. Afghan media has reported that COVID-19 patients are dying in government hospitals due to shortages of medical oxygen. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Afghanistan’s COVID-19 crisis is fuelled by conflict

Decades of armed conflict in Afghanistan has destroyed health-care infrastructure and the reconstruction efforts have failed to provide accessible healthcare, exacerbating the COVID-19 crisis.
Throughout the course of history, it’s usually been politics — not compassion — that’s resulted in prison releases of the type we’ve seen during COVID-19. (Piqsels)

Politics often plays big role in prison releases

The COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity to think critically about the place of prisons in society and how and why prisoners have been released in the past. COVID-19 could spark systemic change.
While primarily a protective measure, the COVID-19 mask has also become a symbol of good citizenship, but wearing a mask safely in public may require white privilege. (Unsplash)

Unmasking the racial politics of COVID-19

In the coronavirus pandemic, wearing a protective mask signifies a commitment to the social and collective good of society. But that changes when a face mask is worn by Black and racialized people.
Beginning in September in Alberta, an individual can apply directly to the provincial government when seeking to establish a new charter school. Here, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, March 20, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Alberta’s risky embrace of charter schools

First, the United Conservative Party lifted the cap on charter schools, and now new legislation has cut school boards out of the process to establish a charter school.
Highly skilled workers and international students in the U.S. are the latest group to be targeted by the Trump adminstration’s restrictive immigration policies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Trump’s suspension of H-1B visas is a racist attack

By making skilled workers the target of his latest anti-immigration policy, U.S. president Trump signals that he is willing to play to his far right base even if it undermines America's economic interests.
Justin Trudeau’s government initiated the Canadian Emergency Response Benefit to help people who lost their jobs during the pandemic. Why not make such a program permanent? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada after COVID-19

Transform CERB into a basic annual income

The relative success of the CERB during the pandemic shows the time is finally right for a permanent basic annual income program.
The number of Canadian peacekeeping forces deployed around the world is at an all-time low. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

The world doesn’t need more Canada

Canada sees itself as a peacekeeper and an independent voice in global affairs. The recent vote for a seat on the UN Security Council shows the world doesn't agree with that image.
We need more positive Indigenous-settler alliances like the one with Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, which created 24 km Freedom Road to provide access to the Trans-Canada Highway. Here a teepee frame sits beside Shoal Lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

COVID-19 crisis calls us towards reconciliation

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis could represent an opportunity to live up to all the recent talk of reconciliation in Canada.
There are more than 3,600 territories in Brazil that are home to Quilombola, descendants of escaped slaves, but few hold titles to the land. (Elielson Pereira da Silva)

Indigenous lands are under threat in Brazil

Jair Bolsonaro's government has put forward laws that could put Indigenous land into the hands of mining, agricultural and timber businesses.
The 100 days of the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the strengths and weaknesses of our food system, including the treatment of migrant labourers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

100 days of coronavirus sent shocks through the food system

COVID-19 has given society a teachable moment, and we should now establish the policies, programs and technologies to ensure our food system becomes stronger, more resilient and more equitable.
The Greenwood section of Tulsa, Okla., is seen in flames during in 1921 during one of the worst acts of anti-Black racism in American history. (Creative Commons)

Trump’s Tulsa rally awakened memories of 1921 race massacre

History will cast a long shadow over Donald Trump's first campaign rally since the pandemic began.
A resident walks down a hallway at a seniors’ residence in Montréal on Jan. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Improving quality of life in LTC homes

A research project may offer insight into how factors like laundry, food and art may be good places to start in addressing problems in long-term care homes.
A homeless woman sits outside a fenced-off camp in Vancouver after a 12 p.m. deadline for the park to be vacated in Vancouver on May 9, 2020. The province relocated hundreds of people from tent encampments in Vancouver and Victoria to hotel and community centre accommodations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Ending homeless camp evictions during COVID-19

Without sufficient safe shelter space and universal testing, cities are forcing homeless people into encampments, limiting their ability to stay safe and violating international human rights laws.
A resident and a worker watch as 150 nursing union members show support at Orchard Villa Long-Term Care in Pickering, Ont., on Monday June 1, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Fixing long-term care during COVID-19

If Canadians want to know what the privatization of health care looks like, long-term care is a cautionary tale.
The Security Council meets at the United Nations headquarters in New York to discuss the situation in Syria in 2019. On this issue, as with many others, the Council’s paralysis had tragic consequences. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The UN Security Council isn’t working. Will it ever be completely reformed?

Canada's recent failure to gain a seat on the UN Security Council indicates the country still has work to do but also highlights the need to reform the powerful body.
An Islamic Society of North America Mosque community member hands out candy to children in a drive-through Eid celebration in Mississauga, Ont., on May 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

The call to prayer in Canada spurred complaints — but not about noise

The public broadcast in Canada of the call to prayer during Ramadan this year caused some tensions. What the preliminary research has shown however, is that it wasn't the noise people objected to.

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Most Read past week

  1. QAnon conspiracy theory followers step out of the shadows and may be headed to Congress
  2. Looking forward to a future without factory farming
  3. Facts or fake news: Revealing patterns in the COVID-19 tweets of Trudeau and Trump
  4. The Church of QAnon: Will conspiracy theories form the basis of a new religious movement?
  5. Now that cannabis is legal, let’s use it to tackle the opioid crisis

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