Cargo containers from Asia are seen in the port of Vancouver in 2015. Canada needs to diversify its trade beyond the United States and increase our links to rapidly growing emerging market economies, particularly in Asia. (Shutterstock)

Why Canada must diversify its trade

Despite the demonization of marginalized communities by politicians on the campaign trail, research shows they’re marked by a profound sense of community, supportive social networks – and resilience. A Toronto Regent Park resident, a boy named Cody, is seen as part of an art installation in this 2008 photo. Dan Bergeron/fauxreel.ca

Strengths of marginalized communities

In this June 2017 photo, a coal barge is positioned as a backdrop behind U.S. President Donald Trump as he speaks during a rally in Cincinnati. A coal company executive said Trump personally promised to activate emergency legal authorities to keep dirty or economically uncompetitive coal plants from shutting down. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

U.S. coal communities: Losing political clout?

The burrowing owl was once a common sight on the prairies. Now Saskatchewan and Alberta have fewer than 1,000 breeding pairs. (Shutterstock)

Conservation costs and policy complications

Carving up ecosystems or opening them to development puts the survival of species at risk.
A forest fire works its way through a wooded area in Saskatchewan in May 2018. High-income nations have benefitted enormously from fossil fuels and the wealthy should now foot the bill to combat climate change. Joanne Francis/Unsplash

Wealth tax would target climate change industries

A wealth tax would put a price on past emissions and could be used to mitigate the negative effects of poverty, including vulnerability to climate change.
Doug Ford on the campaign trail in May 2018, promising to “open” Ontario for business. His Bill 47 does nothing of the sort. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tara Walton

‘Open for Business’ erodes workplace rights

Ontario's Conservative government, despite its "for the people" slogan, is repealing basic protections for the province's most vulnerable workers.
Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Québec’s push to ban the hijab is ‘sexularism’

The Québec government's push to ban the hijab is 'sexularism' and also basic nationalism – one that pits an ‘us’ against ‘them,’ where the ‘them’ represent multiple threats to the nation.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to supporters at Ford Fest in Vaughan, Ont., in September 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

How Ontario isn’t really ‘open for business’

Ontario Premier Doug Ford's Conservative govenment is showing interventionist tendencies that undermine its free-market claims.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant caravan exist?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
A 3D rendering of a command centre interior. (Shutterstock)

Cyberspace argument: Eliminate nukes

Nuclear command and control - the computer systems, networks and procedures - is at risk from cybersecurity threats.
Democrat Beto O'Rourke won 63 percent of Latino voters in Texas, exit polls show, and Latinos seem to have voted in record numbers. But it wasn’t enough to win. AP Photo/Eric Gay

Latinos can be an electoral force in 2020

Record high Latino participation shows this growing voter segment will turn out for parties and politicians who tackle issues they care about. That's a big lesson for 2020 – and not just for Dems.
#winning? Not exactly. EPA Images

Mid-term elections

U.S. mid-term results: Seven key issues

The Democrats took the House of Representatives, but uncertainty remains and Trump is still standing. All eyes are now on Robert Mueller.
The online voting glitches in Ontario’s recent municipal elections show it’s time to develop nationwide guidelines and standards for online voting in Canada. (Shutterstock)

Protecting online elections in Canada

Online voting glitches in Ontario's recent municipal elections show that Canada needs to develop voluntary standards on online voting.
A sign denouncing transphobia is held up in front of the U.S. Supreme Court at a protest in June 2016. (Shutterstock)

Trump’s efforts to redefine gender and sex

Donald Trump is seeking to amend laws that prevent discrimination against Americans based on their sex. It's all just another attempt to fire up the Republican base for the mid-term elections.
In this February 2016 photo, people wave German flags in Erfurt, central Germany, during a demonstration initiated by the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer, file)

Russians have helped fuel Germany’s far right

The political power of Germany's Russian community is significant, and it's helped fuel the rise of the right-wing, anti-immigration Alternative for Germany party known as the AfD.
In this combo photo, German Chancellor Angela Merkel leads the weekly cabinet meeting of her government at the chancellery in Berlin. Merkel has been at the helm of the German government since 2005 but she has announced she won’t run for the party’s leadership again. (AP Photos/Markus Schreiber, file)

What’s next for Germany after Angela Merkel

Germany's long-time Angela Merkel era is coming to an end. But is it the end of one person’s dominance of the political scene, or does it forebode more fundamental changes to German society?
A man adds his comments to a spontaneous memorial of flowers and sidewalk writing that has appeared a block from the Tree of Life Synagogue on Monday, Oct. 29. A gunman shot a killed 11 people while they worshipped at the synagogue the Saturday before. Gene J. Puskar/AP Photo

Educators must challenge the politics of evil

To grasp how extraordinary evils are often committed by ordinary people, we need to consider how we define evil, and most importantly, whom we consider to be the agents of evil.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with B.C. Premier John Horgan at a news conference where LNG Canada announced its decision to build an export facility in Kitimat, B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Making liquified natural gas more sustainable

Burning natural gas produces less greenhouse gases than coal or oil. But the methane emissions associated with natural gas production and liquefaction threaten to erode its environmental benefits.
Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould holds a press conference in the foyer of the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, March 29, 2018, regarding the criminal justice system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How a proposed law could cut off legal aid

Bill C-75 was introduced to the House as a way to fix issues with the criminal justice system. However, an unintended consequence is that low-income people will lose access to law school clinics.

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