Antidepressants bring in almost $17 billion a year for the pharmaceutical industry, and yet science shows their benefit to be small. Natural therapies such as diet, exercise, light therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy are just as effective. (Shutterstock)

Why natural depression therapies are better than pills

The surgical removal of wisdom teeth is far more common than the problems they cause. (Pixabay)

Bad molars? The origins of wisdom teeth

When they cause problems, wisdom teeth don't seem very smart. But they may have been evolution's answer to a coarse diet.
Canadian orthoodontists were able to sell braces and other orthodental procedures by promising patients better lives with better teeth. (Shutterstock)

How did orthodontists sell orthodontics?

Why do Canadians have such straight white teeth? The story is in the marketing of orthodontics in Canada.
The twice-annual time changes affect people similar to the way jet lag does. It’s time to abolish Daylight Saving Time. Sevgi001453d/Pixabay

Why you feel lousy after the clocks change

Research shows that daylight-saving time changes do more harm than good. It's time to abolish the practice.
Perfectionists are rarely satisfied with their performance or appearance and engage in harsh self-criticism when their efforts fall short. Perfectionists are also more likely to develop the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, according to new research. (Shutterstock)

Research: Perfectionists more likely to be bulimic

Perfectionists have a higher chance of developing bulimia nervosa. Rather than treating symptoms of binge eating and vomiting, therapists should address this underlying personality trait.
A and B sample bottles from a human urine doping test. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has set off a controversy by allowing Russia to test its own athletes. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Concerns about lifting Russia’s doping ban

The decision by the World Anti-Doping Agency to lift its ban on Russia's drug testing has set off another controversy about whether there will ever be a level playing field in the world of sports.
A new short drug treatment for tuberculosis, called BPaMZ, is showing promise in trials. (The National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (Georgia) on behalf of TB Alliance)

To eliminate TB we need imagination and ambition

We cannot end TB with century-old technologies and poor quality care. It is time to reinvent the way we are managing TB, and overcome our collective failures of the imagination.
Feeling secure? Tania Kolinko/Shutterstock

What’s your attachment style?

Knowing what your attachment style is can help you navigate life's ups and downs a bit better.
Men of U.S. 64th Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, celebrate the news of the Armistice, November 11, 1918.

Therapeutic writing helped heal a nation

Writers like Virginia Woolf, Arthur Conan Doyle and J.M. Barrie suffered personal loss during the First World War. Their grief and insight helped readers with their own post-war collective grief.
The Family Medicine Forum, Nov. 9, 2017, the Palais des congrès de Montréal. (Twitter/@FamilyMedForum)

Doctors overdosing on industry sponsorship

This week's annual Family Medicine Forum is an opportunity for your family doctor -- to cave or resist in the face of Big Pharma sponsorship and marketing.
#MagicCarpet at King’s Artists – New Thinking, New Making, now on in the Arcade at Bush House, King’s College London. Photograph by Alex Lloyd, KCL.

How art can help us reimagine mental health

Art is no cure all. But it can open up new spaces for us to ask new questions.
A new study finds more Canadians are considering giving up meat, but men are less likely to quit their carnivorous ways. Sander Dalhuise/ Unsplash

Protein wars: Why men love meat

A new study indicates almost a third of Canadians are thinking of eating less meat, but men are less likely to eschew meat. The livestock industry is fighting the protein wars.
For many parents, it’s the haul of gummy worms, licorice, chocolate bars and other high-sugar candies that their kids bring home - not the ghouls and zombies - that is terrifying about Halloween. (Shutterstock)

How to prevent a Halloween sugar disaster

Halloween is upon us, and the sugar is horrible for your kids' teeth and health. But fear not -- there are things parents can do to lessen the impact of the candy binge.
An animal experiment in a laboratory of the pharmaceutical company “Chemie Gruenenthal,” which manufactured the drug Thalidomide, in West Germany in 1969. Thalidomide was prescribed by doctors as a mild sleeping pill and for relief of morning sickness but caused the miscarriage and birth of thousands of children with severe malformations globally. (AP Photo/File)

We need answers to the thalidomide tragedy – to ensure drug safety today

A new book, 'The Thalidomide Catastrophe,' raises new questions about the conduct of corporations involved. It is the duty of governments to find out the answers.
There is a long history of ‘visual apartheid’ in the advertising of the outdoors industry – an absence of Indigenous, Black and other people of colour. (Unsplash/Esther wiegardt)

‘Do white people dominate the outdoors?’

Canada's iconic retailer of outdoor adventure gear recently decided to change its mostly white image by diversifying the catalogue to better reflect the reality of its customers.
Lab-grown or cultured meat, when done at scale, will be an industrial process with significant energy requirements. Beck Diefenbach/Reuters

Cows get a bad rap in lab-grown meat debate

Despite many claims, nobody knows for sure how the environmental footprint of lab-grown meat compares to livestock. An animal scientist says the issue is not black and white.
Lack of clear evidence on impairment from cannabis use has led to vastly different workplace policies. Police officers in Ottawa and Vancouver face no restrictions on their off-work use of cannabis as long as they are fit for duty, officers in Calgary have been banned from use and in Toronto they face a 28-day abstinence period. (Shutterstock)

Workplace health: Measuring impairment

Will offices, construction sites and medical clinics become less safe now that marijuana is legal in Canada? Our experts review the evidence, or lack of it.
Animals in the western Arctic have higher levels of mercury in their bodies than those in the eastern Arctic. (Shutterstock)

How we solved an Arctic mercury mystery

A new study demystifies regional differences in mercury levels in marine animals in the Canadian Arctic.
People exposed to low levels of sunlight are more likely to have MS than those who live in warm climates. chuttersnap

What causes multiple sclerosis?

Young women are disproportionately affected by multiple sclerosis, a disease where the body attacks the brain, scrambling communication to the rest of the body. Here's what we know about the causes.

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