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January is named after the two-faced Roman god Janus, and the Victorians understood this has long been a season of looking backward as much as forward, and not just in search of lessons. (Shutterstock)

How 19th-century Victorians’ wellness resolutions were about self-help — and playful ritual fun

The 1859 book ‘Self-Help’ by Scottish journalist and physician Samuel Smiles was written in bite-sized pieces reminiscent of today’s wellness and lifestyle New Year tips.
The pharma industry warned that if proposed new prescription price guidelines go ahead, drug launches would be delayed and ‘Canadian patients will be deprived of potentially life-saving new medicines.’ (Shutterstock)

How the pharma industry uses disinformation to undermine drug price reform

The pharma industry claims lower prescription drug prices will mean less access to new medication for Canadians. It’s an old threat that pits profits against patients’ rights to affordable drugs.
People protest outside the Tendercare Living Centre long-term-care facility in Scarborough, Ont. during the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2020. This LTC home was hit hard by the second wave of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Why for-profit homes won’t solve long-term care issues

Privatization is an idea that — like a zombie —just won’t die. It’s re-emerging with calls to solve the long-term care crisis with for-profit care homes. Evidence refutes the same old arguments.
Liver transplant surgery. Gabriel Borda / Flickr

Organ donation: whether we opt in or out, research finds it’s the will of our family that matters

Contrary to what we may think, changing people’s default status from non-donor to donor cannot significantly increase organ donation rates — as long as the family is involved in the decision.
NFL player Damar Hamlin’s injury during a game on Jan. 2 may have been a heart injury called commotio cordis. Researchers are working on ways to prevent this rare but often fatal sports injury. (AP Photo/Joshua A. Bickel)

Damar Hamlin injury: Was it commotio cordis? How to prevent a potentially fatal blow to the heart in young athletes

Commotio cordis is the result of blunt trauma to the heart, and is one of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death in youth sports. Improvements in protective equipment may help prevent it.
Buffalo Bills’ Damar Hamlin is examined after collapsing on the field on Jan. 2. He received CPR and defibrillation on site before being sent to hospital by ambulance. (AP Photo/Jeff Dean)

Damar Hamlin’s cardiac arrest shows need for CPR training and emergency defibrillators in public spaces

Survival rates for cardiac arrest outside of hospitals is very low. The fast response to Damar Hamlin’s cardiac arrest during an NFL game shows the value of access to CPR and emergency defibrillators.
When it comes to eye care, regular visits to the optometrist or ophthalmologist can detect the early signs of diabetic damage. (Shutterstock)

Type 2 diabetes in young people puts their eyes at risk

The risk of developing eye complications is high in young people with Type 2 diabetes, which is increasingly affecting children and adolescents, especially those who are more sedentary.
For workers in long-term care homes, distress due to difficult working conditions is often dismissed as a part of the job description. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

5 steps for tackling Canada’s long-term care crisis

The long-term care sector is currently being held together by a very vulnerable workforce, and is at risk of failing without immediate solutions.
Throughout the pandemic, much discussion about COVID-19 transmission focused on individual-level decisions, making it easy to blame the unvaccinated. (Pixabay)

Beyond vaccine hesitancy: Understanding systemic barriers to getting vaccinated

Systemic social issues affect vaccine access and acceptability. Yet, the term ‘vaccine hesitancy’ overlooks this, reducing the multiple factors that affect vaccine uptake to individual-level choices.
Self-compassion can not only enhance physical and psychological health, but may also influence physical activity in the postpartum period. (Shutterstock)

Heart rate variability and self-compassion: Two tools to help postpartum mothers make exercise decisions

Physical activity and new motherhood can be hard to navigate, but physiological feedback and self-compassion can help inform decisions about when and how to exercise.
Even though chronic pain is recognized by scientists as a disease in its own right, it remains largely under-recognized, under-diagnosed and, above all, subject to many prejudices. (Shutterstock)

Chronic pain: An invisible disease whose sufferers are unfairly stigmatized

Although chronic pain is recognized by scientists as a disease in its own right, it remains largely under-recognized, under-diagnosed and, above all, associated with numerous prejudices.
Lecanemab is an antibody that attaches to beta-amyloid proteins accumulated in the brain and allows the immune system to get rid of them. (Shutterstock)

Lecanemab: Experimental drug is a ray of hope for Alzheimer’s disease

An 18-month treatment with lecanemab slows functional and cognitive loss by 27 per cent in people with mild Alzheimer’s disease. But this is only the first step towards a real cure.
Former Saskatchewan Premier and national New Democratic Party leader T.C. (Tommy) Douglas in 1965. Douglas was instrumental in the creation of Medicare. The Canadian Press

Looking forward into the past: Lessons for the future of Medicare on its 60th anniversary

At the dawn of Medicare, Saskatchewan’s community co-op clinics pioneered team-based, holistic care. Now, with the health system in crisis 60 years later, it may be time to return to that care model.
The HIV prevention drug cabotegravir, which is delivery by injection every eight weeks, is not yet available in Canada. (Shutterstock)

Long-acting injectable PrEP is a big step forward in HIV prevention

The next step in HIV prevention — long-acting injectable pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) — is not yet available in Canada, a year after its approval in the U.S.
Nearly 60 per cent of Canadians are finding it difficult to provide enough food for themselves and their families. (Shutterstock)

High food prices could have negative long-term health effects on Canadians

Inflation is driving up food prices and could have a severe impact on the health of Canadians. When the cost of food increases, it restricts the availability of nutritious foods for low-income people.

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