Will white people’s participation in Black Lives Matter protests yield real change? Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

After the civil rights era, white Americans failed to support systemic change to end racism. Will they now?

In principle, white Americans support efforts to end racism. But in practice, they have long been unwilling to support the fundamental change needed to do that. Will this year's events change that?
Unveiling of a statue of Richard T. Greener, the first Black professor at the University of South Carolina, in 2018. Jason Ayer

What should replace Confederate statues?

As momentum builds to remove statutes that pay homage to Confederates and others who sought to uphold white supremacy, a historian explores questions about what should be erected in their place.
Kamala Harris, a U.S. senator from California, endorsed Joe Biden for president in March. Now she is his vice presidential nominee. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Before Kamala Harris became Biden’s running mate, Shirley Chisholm and other Black women aimed for the White House

Many African American women have run for president of the US, despite the enormous barriers facing both Black and female candidates. Biden's pick puts a Black woman much closer to the Oval Office.
A downpour or a drizzle: What causes the difference? David Pinzer Photography/Moment via Getty Images

Why does some rain fall harder than other rain?

Some rainstorms drench you in a second, while others drop rain in a nice peaceful drizzle. A meteorologist explains how rainstorms can be so different.
On Aug. 11, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that a coronavirus vaccine developed in the country has been registered for use. Russian Health Ministry/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A COVID-19 vaccine needs the public’s trust – and it’s risky to cut corners on clinical trials, as Russia is

As Russia fast tracks a coronavirus vaccine, scientists worry about skipped safety checks – and the potential fallout for trust in vaccines if something ends up going wrong.
Tipped workers may struggle to make minimum wage, especially in the wake of the pandemic. Robert Alexander/Getty Images

COVID-19 is hitting tipped workers hard

Tipped workers have been struggling since before COVID-19, and the pandemic isn't making it better.
Incubus, a male demon, was said to prey on sleeping women in mythological tales. Walker, Charles: The encyclopedia of secret knowledge

The belief that demons have sex with humans runs deep in Christian and Jewish traditions

Stella Immanuel, who made headlines recently regarding a false coronavirus cure claim, has many beliefs related to how demons are a threat to humans. An expert explains their long religious history.
Amy Blais, a telehealth nurse at HomeHealth Visiting Nurses in Saco, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

How the old-fashioned telephone could become a new way for some to see their doctor

The old-fashioned telephone – well, maybe not a rotary dial, but a phone nonetheless – became a way during the pandemic for patients to 'see' their doctors. Could this trend continue?
Margot Gage Witvliet was hospitalized with COVID-19 in March. More than four months later, she has yet to recover. Courtesy of Margot Gage Witvliet

I’m a COVID-19 long-hauler and an epidemiologist – here’s how it feels when symptoms last for months

Margot Gage Witvliet went from being healthy and active to fearing she was dying almost overnight. An epidemiologist, she dug into the research to understand what's happening to long-haulers like her.
The wall of Moms group is the latest in a long tradition of mothers’ movements around the world. Alisha Jucevic via Getty Images / AFP via Getty Images

Video: The Wall of Moms builds on a long protest tradition

By inflicting violence on protesting moms, governments only amplify the message of the movement they seek to quell.
The Texas frosted elfin (Callophrys irus hadros), a small butterfly subspecies found only in Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, has lost most of its prairie habitat and is thought to have dramatically declined over the last century. Matthew D. Moran

Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America

Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect populations have sparked concern about an 'insect apocalypse.' But a new analysis of data from sites across North America suggests the case isn't proven.
Protesters at the Richmond, Virginia monument to Confederate General Robert E. Lee on June 18, 2020. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

African Americans have long defied white supremacy and celebrated Black culture in public spaces

Protests of Confederate flags and monuments have grown since 2015, but resistance is not new. African Americans have been protesting against Confederate monuments since they were erected.

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  1. ‘Morality pills’ may be the US’s best shot at ending the coronavirus pandemic, according to one ethicist
  2. How to use ventilation and air filtration to prevent the spread of coronavirus indoors
  3. Up to 204,691 extra deaths in the US so far in this pandemic year
  4. I’m a COVID-19 long-hauler and an epidemiologist – here’s how it feels when symptoms last for months
  5. The belief that demons have sex with humans runs deep in Christian and Jewish traditions

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