Employees work on the production line of chloroquine phosphate, resumed after a 15-year break, in a pharmaceutical company in Nantong city in east China’s Jiangsu province Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

In the rush to innovate for COVID-19 drugs, sound science is still essential

The Capital One Arena, home of the Washington Capitals, sits empty. AP Photo/Nick Wass

A world without sports

This isn't the first time sports have been put on hold. But in the past, the reprieve was brief, and sports went on to act as a way to bring Americans together. This time's different.
Florida Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, who did not issue a stay-at-home order for his state until April 1, 2020. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Democratic governors are quicker in responding to the coronavirus than Republicans

When US governors declared a state of emergency is likely pivotal in mitigating how hard COVID-19 hits their states. And it turns out that one party's governors made those decisions more quickly.
In the heat, tomato plants can’t fight off the hungry tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. From www.shutterstock.com

Crops could face double trouble from insects and a warming climate

Plants have evolved techniques for protecting themselves from heat and insect attacks – but when both these stresses happen at once, one defense may neutralize the other.
Rosa Gutierrez Lopez from El Salvador has been living in sanctuary in a church for a year due to a deportation order. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Why Latino citizens are worrying more about deportation

About 48% of Latino US citizens fear deportation for themselves, their loved ones or their communities. That's up from 41% in 2007.
Many breeders say they’re stewards of conservation, but no captive tiger has ever been released into the wild. AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian

‘Tiger King’ and America’s captive tiger problem

There are more captive tigers in the US than there are in the wild around the world – and they can be bought for less than some breeds of dog puppies.
People have resorted to using scarves and bandanas as face masks to protect against spreading coronavirus. While cloth masks aren’t as effective as surgical masks, research suggests they can limit the spread of droplets. Jens Schleuter/Getty Images

Why wear face masks in public? Here’s what the research shows

U.S. health officials flipped their advice and now recommend everyone wear cloth masks in public to reduce the spread of coronavirus to others. Some cities have fines for going without masks.
Waitress Casey Stewart works at two restaurants, at least one which may have to close for at least a week or more. AP Photo/Kathy Willens

How the coronavirus recession puts service workers at risk

Service workers are some of the most at risk of both the coronavirus and financial woes.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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  4. Should I exercise during the coronavirus pandemic? Experts explain the just right exercise curve
  5. The CDC now recommends wearing a mask in some cases – a physician explains why and when to wear one

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