In a 1775 cartoon, a British cartoonist mocks how wealthy elites were compelled by ordinary Americans to respect trade and price regulations. Philip Dawe/Wikimedia Commons

Fight for economic equality is as old as America itself

Fears of great wealth and the need for economic equality go back to the country's origins.
In healthy older people, loneliness has a pattern of stress response similar to that of people who are under chronic stress. Justin Paget via Getty Images

The loneliness of social isolation can affect your brain and raise dementia risk in older adults

The social isolation older adults are experiencing as they try to stay safe from the coronavirus pandemic is raising new mental health risks, but people can take steps to protect themselves.
Pope Francis observes a minute of silence for the victims of Hiroshima at the city’s Peace Memorial Park. Carl Court/Getty Images

75 years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Vatican is providing moral guidance on nuclear weapons

As Pope Francis becomes the first pontiff in the nuclear era to call for total disarmament, all of us – whether secular or religious – can engage through creative and proactive moral responsibility.
A marijuana trafficker practicing his aim in the Guajira, epicenter of Colombia’s first drug boom, in 1979. Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images

Marijuana fueled Colombian drug trade before cocaine was king

Step aside, Pablo Escobar. New research shows it was poor farmers who helped turn Colombia into the world's largest drug producer when they started growing and exporting pot in the 1970s.
Delegates after Donald Trump accepted the GOP presidential nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Thursday, July 21, 2016. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/via Getty

Political conventions today are for partying and pageantry, not picking nominees

Political conventions used to pick presidential nominees in private. Now the public picks the nominee and then the party has a big party at the convention, writes a scholar of US elections.
The 2018 Camp Fire north of Sacramento burned everything in its path: cars, power lines, and buildings – and contaminated local drinking water. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Wildfires can poison drinking water – here’s how communities can be better prepared

Buildings aren't the only things at risk in wildfires. Recent disasters in California have left local water system contaminated with toxic chemicals afterward, slowing return and recovery.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

Editor's Picks

Most Read past week

  1. Does coronavirus linger in the body? What we know about how viruses in general hang on in the brain and testicles
  2. Why hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine don’t block coronavirus infection of human lung cells
  3. Next COVID casualty: Cities hit hard by the pandemic face bankruptcy
  4. 5 takeaways from MacKenzie Scott’s $1.7 billion in support for social justice causes
  5. Apollo 11 brought a message of peace to the Moon – but Neil and Buzz almost forgot to leave it behind

Pitch an idea

Got a news tip or article idea for The Conversation?

Tell us

Our Audience

The Conversation has a monthly audience of 18 million users, and reach of 42 million through Creative Commons republication.

Want to Write?

Write an article and join a growing community of more than 110,600 academics and researchers from 3,633 institutions.

Register now

Make a Donation

The Conversation relies on university, foundation and reader support. If you would like to help us have even better conversations, then you may like to make a one-off or on-going donation.

Donate