Inequality

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Analysis and Comment

Dana Gasby, left, interacts with her mother B. Smith in their East Hampton home on Long Island, New York, on Wednesday, January 9, 2019. B. Smith has Alzheimer’s Disease. Karten Moran for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The importance of blood tests for Alzheimer’s: 2 neuroscientists explain the recent findings

A blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease in people who have symptoms and even those who don't has been shown to work. Scientists still need to improve its accuracy rate to almost 100%, however.

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Race and racism

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Reopening

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Mental health

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Around the world

A nearly deserted street in the city of Nice, France, on May 6, the 51st day of lockdown there. Europe’s method of reopening is markedly different from the U.S. plan. Getty Images / Valery Hache

What US states can learn from COVID-19 transition planning in Europe

As the US prepares to reopen from weeks of social distancing, it’s worth noting what other countries are doing.

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Editors’ Picks

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  4. Low blood pressure could be a culprit in dementia, studies suggest
  5. Could employers and states mandate COVID-19 vaccinations? Here’s what the courts have ruled

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