Fisheries

Larval black sea bass, an important commercial species along the US Atlantic coast. NOAA Fisheries/Ehren Habeck

Fish larvae float across national borders, binding the world’s oceans in a single network

Fish can't read maps, and their eggs and larvae drift across national boundaries. Recent research shows that local problems in one fishery can affect others across wide areas.

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Analysis and Comment

Shark Week looms, but don’t panic

Media coverage of sharks often exaggerates risks to people, but more than 500 shark species have never been known to attack humans, and there's lots to learn about them.

Curious Kids: Why do birds sing?

Birds spend a lot of time and energy singing, but they don't do it the same way in every season of the year. And some can't sing at all. What's the purpose of birdsong?

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Research and News

We use satellites to measure water scarcity

Climate change threatens the water supply of nations around the world. But it's difficult to measure whether a region has sufficient water to satisfy the people who live there. Could satellites help?

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Climate change

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Plastics

Plastic waste from Australia in Port Klang, Malaysia. Malaysia says it will send back some 3,300 tons of nonrecyclable plastic waste to countries including the U.S., U.K., Canada and Australia. AP Photo/Vincent Thian

As more developing countries reject plastic waste exports, wealthy nations seek solutions at home

A year after China stopped accepting most scrap material exports, other Asian countries are following Beijing's lead, forcing wealthy nations to find domestic solutions for managing their wastes.

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Under the sea

Climate change could further stress species such as Atlantic cod that already are threatened by overfishing. Vladimir Wrangel/Shutterstock

How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears

Tiny calcified formations inside fishes' ears can be used to trace a fish's life history – and potentially, how climate change has affected its growth and development.

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Politics and the environment

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Research and Expert Database

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