An Islamic revolution ran the shah out of Iran in 1979. Now, his father’s mummified body has resurfaced. AP Photo

Unearthed mummy recalls an Iran before the ayatollahs

A mummy unearthed during construction in Iran may be the body of a former shah. For the Islamic regime, the discovery is an unwelcome reminder of Iran's secular past. For protesters, it holds promise.
Venezuelans were once among the world’s happiest people. Then the country descended into economic chaos and humanitarian crisis. Jorge Silva/Ruters

Why Venezuelans are some of the unhappiest people in the world

Venezuela – once known for its friendly people, oil wealth and beauty queens – ranks 102nd of 156 countries surveyed in this year's World Happiness Report, which measures well-being worldwide.
Protests against social security reforms in Nicaragua quickly gained traction. Now, even the Catholic Church is suggesting ‘democratization’ may be on the horizon. Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas

Nicaragua protests threaten an authoritarian regime that looked like it might never fall

For 11 years, Daniel Ortega's regime has been unshakable. But Nicaragua's autocratic leader is vulnerable after weeks of deadly protest. Now, some citizens are calling for him to resign.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan in 2017. AP/Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo

Armenia rejects the ‘politics of eternity’

Armenian Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan was just deposed. His party's still in power, though, and he could end up ruling anyway, behind a curtail like the Wizard of Oz.
Sens. Bob Corker and Bob Menendez look on during the second round of questioning of Secretary of State-designate Mike Pompeo. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Senate confirmation: The grilling can be grueling

Senate confirmation for many of President Trump's nominees has been tough. In this speed read, The Conversation asks: What is Senate confirmation, and why do we do it?
President Donald Trump and former FBI Director James Comey. AP Photo/Evan Vucci, left, and Andrew Harnik

Why does a president demand loyalty from people who work for him?

There's a trade-off when presidents appoint loyalists. A loyalist may not be as competent as the position demands, but he or she may satisfy the president by carrying out his agenda.
Some 200,000 Argentinean women marched on March 8 for International Women’s Day. Many proclaimed their support for legalizing abortion. AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta

Argentina’s abortion legalization debate ignites soul searching on women’s rights

A new bill that would legalize abortion in Argentina has spurred surprise debate on the gender pay gap, parental leave and political representation. Will Argentinean women finally get their due?

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