One government transparency movement may now be threatened by the other. Shutterstock

Could the open government movement shut the door on Freedom of Information?

During Sunshine Week, three scholars of government transparency look at a potential collision between the old freedom of information movement and the new open government movement. Is there room for both?
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. KCNA/via Reuters

What makes Kim Jong Un tick?

A scholar who has profiled leaders like Saddam Hussein and Vladimir Putin says there is a method to understanding the madness.
Could the solution to a nuclear North Korea lie in arbitration? Reuters/Damir Sagolj

Arbitration as a way out of the North Korean crisis

Trump and Kim are due to meet this spring. But if these talks fail could international arbitration provide - as it has in the past - an alternative way out of the North Korean crisis?
U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un featured in a South Korean news program. AP

Trump meets Kim Jong Un: 5 essential reads

What scholars know about the past, present and future of the US' relationship with North Korea, as the two countries' leaders prepare to meet.
Nikolas Cruz, facing 17 charges of premeditated murder, appears in court. REUTERS/Mike Stocker

School shooters: What can law enforcement do to stop them?

Florida does not have a 'red flag' law that would have let police seize Nikolas Cruz's guns before he killed. But there are actions law enforcement could have taken to address his murderous impulses.
Deedra Abboud is running for the U.S. Senate in Arizona. AP Photo/Matt York

Why you should vote for a woman in 2018

Research shows they face greater obstacles to election than their male counterparts, thus work harder and represent constituents better.
The number of Guatemalan children adopted by foreign parents dropped from 4,100 in 2008 to 58 in 2010, after the country drastically curtailed the practice. Reuters/Jorge Dan Lopez

International adoptions have dropped 72 percent since 2005 – here’s why

In 2005, almost 46,000 children were adopted across borders. Ten years later, just 12,000 were. The foreign adoption system is imploding, potentially putting children's lives in danger.

Research and Expert Database

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