Menu Close
Is it a lovely autumn day, or is America burning to the ground? Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Feeling disoriented by the election, pandemic and everything else? It’s called ‘zozobra,’ and Mexican philosophers have some advice

Mexican philosophers have a word for the peculiar anxiety you may be feeling: 'zozobra,' a dizziness that arises from social disintegration.
The CDC has put out several conflicting messages of late, giving rise to concerns about trust. Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Why mixed messaging can erode trust in institutions

The CDC has released conflicting messages on masks and transmission of the coronavirus. A scholar explains the nature of trust and why institutions need to be careful.
Smart or unethical? What does philosophy say about avoiding taxes? SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Is tax avoidance ethical? Asking for a friend

Wriggling out of paying taxes may be legal, but is it right? Aristotle, Immanuel Kant – and others – have their say.
Demonstrators at Philadelphia International Airport protest President Trump’s executive order clamping down on refugee admissions on Jan. 29, 2017. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Refugees don’t undermine the US economy – they energize it

Refugees hinder the US economy, the Trump administration has said as it cuts refugee admissions to record lows. But data show that they boost economies, revive neighborhoods and expand tax bases.
An homage to Samuel Paty, a teacher murdered after showing caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed from the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Oct. 18, 2020. Adnan Farzat/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Beheading in France could bolster president’s claim that Islam is in ‘crisis’ – but so is French secularism

Macron wants to 'build an Islam in France that can be compatible with the Enlightenment.' But that goal assumes France is compatible with Islam, says a Muslim scholar of religion and politics.
In ancient Athens, only the richest people paid taxes on wealth, and they were happy to do it. Twospoonfuls via Wikimedia Commons

Only the richest ancient Athenians paid taxes – and they bragged about it

In ancient Athens, the richest people paid taxes to support what the residents considered the salvation of the city. These taxes earned them social and political clout more valuable than money.
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in Oct. 12 for her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Leah Millis/Pool via AP

The history of oath ceremonies and why they matter when taking office

Taking oath is an important tradition before assuming charge of a public office. It entails a commitment to the future. What is the history of oath-taking?
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks via video link during the second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Oct. 13, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

How the Supreme Court can maintain its legitimacy amid intensifying partisanship

Though critics claim Amy Coney Barrett's nomination jeopardizes the high court's legitimacy, research shows there are ways the judiciary can bolster its standing and weather controversial decisions.
Members of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal organization, which began in Pennsylvania in 1967, holding a meeting in France. Photo by Jacques Pavlovsky/Sygma via Getty Images

What is charismatic Catholicism?

The Catholic charismatic movement in the United States began during the 1960s. The practices of Catholic charismatics encompass various forms of Pentecostalism.

More Analysis and Comment

Just a thought

You have to keep breaking your heart until it opens. Rumi