Frankenstein’s monster in the Hollywood Wax Museum. The fictional character first appeared in Mary Shelley’s novel in 1818. www.shutterstock.com

What Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein teaches us about the need for mothers

By showing us a world from which mothers are largely absent, Mary Shelley reminds us that the genius of motherhood lies less in biological reproduction than in the capacity to love.
Mosaics by artist Chuck Close on the walls of the new 86th Street subway station on the Second Avenue line in New York. AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File

#MeToo in the art world: Genius should not excuse sexual harassment

In his short play from 1830, 'Mozart and Salieri,' Russian poet Alexander Pushkin proposed that genius and evil are incompatible. Here's why this argument is worth revisiting in light of #MeToo.
Father Patrick Conroy. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why does Congress have a chaplain?

Following the controversy over the resignation of House chaplain Patrick Conroy, in this speed read, scholars explain when the tradition of legislative prayer was started and how it has sustained.
How do survivors find healing? Chum Mey, a survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime, walks past a portrait of Nuon Chea, a former Khmer Rouge leader. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

Bearing witness to Cambodia’s horror, 20 years after Pol Pot’s death

The accounts of survivors of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge show how they were able to find justice and healing by breaking their silence and speaking on behalf of those who were killed.
Several thousand people gather at a rally in Washington in 1952 to hear Evangelist Billy Graham preach. AP Photo

Could there be another Billy Graham?

Current trends suggest that evangelicalism is out of step with younger Americans. But, a scholar says, evangelicalism has been here before.
Relics of St. Valentine of Terni at the basilica of Saint Mary in Cosmedin. Dnalor 01 (Own work)

The ‘real’ St. Valentine was no patron of love

Valentine's Day originated as a feast to celebrate the decapitation of a third-century Christian martyr, or perhaps two. So how did the day become a celebration of love?

More Analysis and Comment

Just a thought

Ramadan is a period of fasting and spiritual growth, and is one of the five “pillars of Islam” (the others being the declaration of faith, daily prayer, alms-giving, and the pilgrimage to Mecca). Able-bodied Muslims are expected to abstain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to sunset each day of the month. Mohammad Hassan Khalil

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  5. Why we need to rethink how to teach the Holocaust

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