Who really are America’s irreligious? Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston

The changing nature of America’s irreligious explained

Americans are increasingly choosing not to identify with any religious tradition. But this group of irreligious people is a complex one – with different relationships to religion.
Sister Frances Carr, left, and Brother Arnold Hadd of the Shaker Village sing during a rehearsal on Sept. 13, 1995. AP Photo/Adam Nadel

Why the legacy of Shakers will endure

The Shakers prioritized harmony and a simple lifestyle. They were among the earliest proponents of gender equality.
A woman stands near an exhibit of photographs of victims of the Holocaust called the ‘Klarsfeld Pillars’ in New York. Mike Segar/Reuters

Exploring the complexities of forgiveness

Can the Nazis be forgiven? A rabbi explains why this question needs a more profound examination of some of Judaism's deepest ethical mores and theological beliefs
Students protesting on campus in Davis, California, following the election of Donald Trump. Max Whittaker/Reuters

What’s the history of sanctuary spaces and why do they matter?

Students and faculty are demanding universities declare themselves sanctuary campuses. Historically, sanctuary offered both legal and moral protection for the vulnerable.
Protesters block a highway in near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. AP Photo/James MacPherson

How Standing Rock became a site of pilgrimage

Thousands of people, both those within Native American communities and their non-Native allies, felt called to go to Standing Rock. What was the motivation?
A woman waits behind a Cuban flag for the arrival of Fidel Castro’s funeral procession in Esperanza, Cuba. AP Photos/Natacha Pisarenko

Religion shapes Cuba despite Castro’s influence

Under Fidel Castro, Cuba declared itself as an atheist state. Castro's relationship with religion, however, was far more complex. It left a deep impact on the religious identity of Cuba.

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Do not allow those that destroy the Earth, which destroy the environment and the ecological balance, and which end up destroying the wisdom of peoples. Pope Francis

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