Though Chief Wahoo won’t appear on uniforms, there’s no reason to think that the mascot won’t endure on signs, clothing and memorabilia. Arturo Pardavila III

Sports

The Cleveland Indians’ Chief Wahoo isn’t going away anytime soon

Research on the relationship between mascots and fandom shows just how tricky it is to truly eradicate a mascot from a region's collective identity.
Neuroscientists have been scanning the brains of select Super Bowl viewers to see how they’re reacting to the commercials that air. thaikrit/Shutterstock.com

Media

The transformation of the Super Bowl ad experience

Companies are now tracking how consumers react on social media to Super Bowl ads. They’re also studying how the brain responds to them. Could personalized Super Bowl ads be on the horizon?
Lil’ Kim performs during the 2015 BET Awards in Los Angeles, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Reuters

Race

Black America’s ‘bleaching syndrome’

The longing for lighter skin remains a taboo topic in African-American communities.
A connection can be made in between Ursula Le Guin’s fiction and her father’s groundbreaking work in anthropology. Oregon State University

Literature

The education of Ursula Le Guin

Le Guin's father, Alfred Kroeber, was at a forefront of a movement that rejected social Darwinism and cultural superiority. In his daughter's fiction, we see these ideas come to life.
Jihyun Park finds joy in the little things many take for granted, whether it’s being able to drop her kids off at school or having family dinners.

Parenting

For a North Korean refugee raising her kids in the UK, the past is never far

Jihyun Park escaped North Korea and is now living in Manchester. But how to explain her scars to her children? Or why they can't call their relatives still living in North Korea?
Patriots head coach Bill Belichick talks to players during a game against the New Orleans Saints on Sept. 17, 2017. AP Photo/Butch Dill

Sports

Talent doesn’t explain the success of the Patriots and Eagles

According to a management scholar, a team's mindset and structure – not its stars – will often determine its success.
The Philadelphia Eagles’ defense has allowed only 33 points over its past four games. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Sports

Does defense actually win championships?

Does the Eagles' vaunted defense give them an edge? Cal State Northridge's sport psychology lab ran a regression analysis to test the popular adage.
Although measures of teen and adult happiness dropped during the high unemployment rates of the Great Recession, it didn’t rebound when the economy started to improve. ASDF_MEDIA/Shutterstock.com

Lifestyle

What might explain the unhappiness epidemic?

Changes in how we're spending our free time is a likely culprit.
Consolidation is happening at a rapid pace. But who will bear the brunt of the costs? Khakimullin Aleksandr/Shutterstock.com

Television

Defanged regulations have big media licking their chops

In the coming year, media companies will be adjusting to a new reality – one that ultimately leaves consumers with fewer choices.
Kids shouldn’t be expected to self-regulate the amount of time they spend on the device. And parents are finding it tougher and tougher to impose limits. Vitalinka/Shutterstock.com

Media

Does Apple have an obligation to make the iPhone safer for kids?

The problem isn't kids owning smartphones. But when daily use exceeds two hours a day, mental health issues start to crop up.
Can technology be tamed? Or have we already lost complete control? Tom Simpson

Literature

What can be done about our modern-day Frankensteins?

Much like the fictitious Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's novel, more and more scientists are running away from their real-life creations.
Lucian Wintrich, left, leaves court on Dec. 11 after charges of breach of peace were dropped. In November, Wintrich had delivered a speech at the University of Connecticut titled ‘It’s OK To Be White.’ AP Photo/Jessica Hill

Race

The dangerous belief that white people are under attack

A majority of white Americans now believe that white people experience racial discrimination, and memes like #ItsOkayToBeWhite are only fanning the flames.
Political reporter William D. Workman speaks at a GOP event in 1962. Courtesy of South Carolina Political Collections, University of South Carolina

Media

Before Breitbart, there was the Charleston News and Courier

In the 1960s, white newspaper journalists exploited racial divisions to help build the GOP's southern firewall.

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