Environment + Energy – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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Cooked chicken meat imported from China could end up in U.S. restaurant meals without information about its origin. Jacek Chabraszewski/Shutterstock

How safe is chicken imported from China? 5 questions answered

China has started exporting cooked chicken meat to the United States. Is it safe to eat? An agriculture extension specialist discusses possible concerns about food safety and contamination.
U.S. Army Spc. Pam Anderson applies first-aid medical attention to an elderly man during flood relief operations just outside of Winona, Minnesota, August 20, 2007. Staff Sgt. Daniel Ewer, U.S. Army

Disasters can harm older adults long after storms have passed

New research shows that older people are especially at risk during and after natural disasters, and may need medical help or other support well after relief operations end.
London plane trees, like these in Cadman Park in Brooklyn, New York, are one of the most popular species for shading urban streets. Molybdena

Cities need more than air conditioning to get through heat waves

How can cities protect residents during heat waves? There's no single solution, but expanding air conditioning, installing passive cooling features in homes and planting shade trees all can help.
Children run through an open fire hydrant to cool off during the kickoff of the 2016 Summer Playstreets Program in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, July, 6, 2016. AP Photo/Ezra Kaplan

Heat waves threaten city dwellers, especially minorities and the poor

Climate change is making heat waves more frequent and intense around the world. Cities are hotter than surrounding areas, so urban dwellers – especially minorities and the poor – are at greatest risk.
To comply with air pollution laws, midwest energy companies built tall smokestacks to displace pollutants. This one at Indiana’s Rockport Generating Station is 1,038 feet high, just 25 feet shorter than the Eiffel Tower. Don Sniegowski

Why shifting regulatory power to the states won’t improve the environment

Trump administration officials argue that states can regulate more effectively than the federal government. But without leadership from the top, federalism may allow red states to avoid acting.
Six million people in Pennsylvania and neighboring states get their drinking water from the Susquehanna River. Major pollution sources include agriculture, urban development and industry. Nicholas A. Tonelli

Is your drinking water safe? Here’s how you can find out

America's drinking water infrastructure is aging and needs billions of dollars in upgrades. Two extension educators urge consumers to monitor their water and have it tested if they suspect problems.
Tamotsu Ito/Shutterstock.com

To restore our soils, feed the microbes

Healthy soil teems with bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms that help store carbon and fend off plant diseases. To restore soil, scientists are finding ways to foster its microbiome.
Sales of electric vehicles are growing fast, especially in Europe. Sopotnicki/Shutterstock.com

How electric vehicles could take a bite out of the oil market

Shifting to plug-in cars wouldn't be enough to max out global oil consumption by 2040. But it could help make that happen if cities pitch in and ride-sharing doesn't crowd out public transportation.
Scientists provide key input to government agencies on issues such as improving oil spill prevention and response after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. U.S. Coast Guard

History shows that stacking federal science advisory committees doesn’t work

Can federal agencies stack advisory panels with friendly members? Some have tried, but a scientist who has advised many administrations says they will produce bad policies that lack broad support.