University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is a national leader among public research universities, where more than 30,000 students are enrolled in over 100 undergraduate majors and 86 graduate fields of study, are situated in prime locations between New York and Boston. In recent years, the University has been busy racking up high-profile nods from organizations like U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its education and initiatives. The rise of the University over the last two decades has been astounding, as UConn achieves new heights of academic success – doubling research grants, attracting top students, and offering programs that continue to grow in prestige. Next Generation Connecticut, an unprecedented investment by the State of Connecticut, demonstrates UConn’s commitment to comprehensive research and education and ensures that we attract internationally renowned faculty and the world’s brightest students. With annual research expenditures in excess of $200 million, collaborative research is carried out within the departments of our 14 schools and colleges and at our more than 100 research centers and institutes. As a vibrant, progressive leader, UConn fosters a diverse and dynamic culture that meets the challenges of a changing global society.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 123 articles

Forest restoration is underway in Biliran, Leyte, Philippines led by the local community with support from international researchers and government agencies. Robin Chazdon

High-value opportunities exist to restore tropical rainforests around the world – here’s how we mapped them

Restoring tropical rainforests is good for the climate, wild species and humans. But where to start? A new study pinpoints locations that will maximize benefits and minimize negative impacts.
Former Georgia Tech head coach MaChelle Joseph looks on during an NCAA college basketball game against Notre Dame in February 2019. AP Photo/Robert Franklin

The war on women coaches

Why do female college coaches seem to be held to a different standard than their male counterparts?
Daylight saving time is an artificial way of adjusting time, but nothing changes when the sun rises and sets. Jerry Regis/Shutterstock.com

The hazards of living on the right side of a time zone border

Humans have natural cycles for when they are active and for when they sleep. Modern work and school schedules interfere with this, and more studies are showing why there's a possible health risk.
Some studies don’t hold up to added scrutiny. PORTRAIT IMAGES ASIA BY NONWARIT/shutterstock.com

The replication crisis is good for science

Rising evidence shows that many psychology studies don't stand up to added scrutiny. The problem has many scientists worried – but it could also encourage them to up their game.
What came first – all-seeing Gods or complex societies? God the Father and Angel, Guercino Giovan Francesco Barbieri via Wikimedia Commons

Big gods came after the rise of civilisations, not before, finds study using huge historical database

God only started watching over us quite recently, according to a new study that analysed 414 societies from 30 world regions.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
Some charter school operators make profits by leasing space to themselves at unusually high rates. By Ilya Andriyanov from www.shutterstock.com

Charter schools exploit lucrative loophole that would be easy to close

Charter school operators have been capitalizing on lax laws that let them lease building space to themselves at above-market rates. A simple ban could end the practice, two education scholars argue.
Shutterstock / Lightspring

¿Qué hace la gripe con nuestro cuerpo?

Cualquiera que haya tenido la gripe puede atestiguar que se siente fatal. Pero, ¿por qué? ¿Qué está sucediendo dentro del cuerpo que produce tanto dolor y malestar? Una inmunóloga lo explica.
Un monstruo de Gila (Heloderma suspectum). Shutterstock / reptiles4all

La naturaleza es un filón para obtener medicinas, pero solo si la protegemos

El monstruo de Gila proporcionó a los humanos un tratamiento para la diabetes. ¿Qué otros milagros médicos estamos perdiendo por no proteger la vida silvestre y los ecosistemas?

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