University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is a national leader among public research universities, where more than 30,000 students are enrolled in over 100 undergraduate majors and 86 graduate fields of study, are situated in prime locations between New York and Boston. In recent years, the University has been busy racking up high-profile nods from organizations like U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its education and initiatives. The rise of the University over the last two decades has been astounding, as UConn achieves new heights of academic success – doubling research grants, attracting top students, and offering programs that continue to grow in prestige. Next Generation Connecticut, an unprecedented investment by the State of Connecticut, demonstrates UConn’s commitment to comprehensive research and education and ensures that we attract internationally renowned faculty and the world’s brightest students. With annual research expenditures in excess of $200 million, collaborative research is carried out within the departments of our 14 schools and colleges and at our more than 100 research centers and institutes. As a vibrant, progressive leader, UConn fosters a diverse and dynamic culture that meets the challenges of a changing global society.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 116 articles

Some studies don’t hold up to added scrutiny. PORTRAIT IMAGES ASIA BY NONWARIT/shutterstock.com

The replication crisis is good for science

Rising evidence shows that many psychology studies don't stand up to added scrutiny. The problem has many scientists worried – but it could also encourage them to up their game.
What came first – all-seeing Gods or complex societies? God the Father and Angel, Guercino Giovan Francesco Barbieri via Wikimedia Commons

Big gods came after the rise of civilisations, not before, finds study using huge historical database

God only started watching over us quite recently, according to a new study that analysed 414 societies from 30 world regions.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.
Some charter school operators make profits by leasing space to themselves at unusually high rates. By Ilya Andriyanov from www.shutterstock.com

Charter schools exploit lucrative loophole that would be easy to close

Charter school operators have been capitalizing on lax laws that let them lease building space to themselves at above-market rates. A simple ban could end the practice, two education scholars argue.
Shutterstock / Lightspring

¿Qué hace la gripe con nuestro cuerpo?

Cualquiera que haya tenido la gripe puede atestiguar que se siente fatal. Pero, ¿por qué? ¿Qué está sucediendo dentro del cuerpo que produce tanto dolor y malestar? Una inmunóloga lo explica.
Un monstruo de Gila (Heloderma suspectum). Shutterstock / reptiles4all

La naturaleza es un filón para obtener medicinas, pero solo si la protegemos

El monstruo de Gila proporcionó a los humanos un tratamiento para la diabetes. ¿Qué otros milagros médicos estamos perdiendo por no proteger la vida silvestre y los ecosistemas?
Natural supplements may be popular, but they can have dangerous side effects when they include prescription drugs. Oleksandr Zamuruiev/Shutterstock.com

Beware of natural supplements for sex gain and weight loss

Men who can't take drugs for erectile dysfunction and overweight people who can't lose weight sometimes turn to natural supplements, thinking they are safe. Many times, they are not.
Habitantes de Ciudad de México navegan por la web en una “aldea digital” en 2015 dentro del programa del Gobierno para asegurar el acceso a Internet de todos los ciudadanos. AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo

El acceso universal a Internet en México reduciría la pobreza

México hizo de la conectividad a Internet un derecho constitucional en 2013, pero la mayoría de las personas pobres aún no tienen acceso. De obtenerlo, gozarían de una mayor movilidad económica.
Mexicans surf the web at a ‘digital village’ in Mexico City in 2015, part of the country’s effort to get all citizens online. AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo

Mexico wants internet access for all. Getting everyone online could reduce poverty, too

Mexico made internet connectivity a constitutional right in 2013, but most poor people still aren't online. Research shows that internet access would give these residents more economic mobility.

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