Colorado State University

Founded in 1870 as the Colorado Agricultural College, Colorado State University is now among the nation’s leading research universities. Located in Fort Collins, CSU currently enrolls about 22,650 undergraduate students, 4,100 graduate students and 550 Professional Veterinary Medicine students, and has more than 1,800 faculty members working in eight colleges. More information is available at www.colostate.edu.

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Another day, another diet. Yuriy Maksymiv/Shutterstock

The long, strange history of dieting fads

For centuries, people have been trying to lose weight in all sorts of ways – including drinking vinegar, avoiding swamps and stocking up on grapefruit.
Locking articles away behind a paywall stifles access. Elizabeth

Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning

In our institutions of higher education and our research labs, scholars first produce, then buy back, their own content. With the costs rising and access restricted, something's got to give.
Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
A male boreal toad waits for opportunities to mate near a Colorado mountain lake. Brittany Mosher

Saving amphibians from a deadly fungus means acting without knowing all the answers

Frogs and toads are declining around the world, with many species on the brink of extinction. Acting in time means trying strategies without complete information about how likely they are to work.
Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp rescues two dogs after floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey reached the grounds of a shelter in Vidor, Texas, Aug. 31, 2017. Christopher LIndahl/U.S. Navy

In cities and on ranches, planning is key to protect animals during disasters

During Hurricane Katrina in 2005, some people died rather than evacuating without their pets. Now emergency managers are required to include animals in their response plans.
As many people have had to wade through floodwaters, they need to be aware of the risk of infection and disease from contaminated waters. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Flooding from Hurricane Harvey causes a host of public health concerns

As Houston continues to rescue residents whose homes were ruined, it also begins to deal with issues related to contaminated floodwaters and overflowing reservoirs. It won't be easy.
The rainfall from Harvey has now exceeded the amount from the previous record-bearer, Tropical Storm Amelia in 1978. AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

What made the rain in Hurricane Harvey so extreme?

An expert in extreme weather events explains why the rain – and thus flooding – associated with Hurricane Harvey has been 'unprecedented.'
Jimmy John’s tried to stop its workers from toiling for other sandwich makers. AP Photo/David Goldman

How noncompete clauses clash with US labor laws

Nearly one in five employed Americans is bound by a contract restricting moves to rival companies. Here's one way to make those arrangements less common.
A 1765 painting of Helios, the personification of the sun in Greek mythology. Wikimedia Commons

How ancient cultures explained eclipses

The sun was worshiped as a deity in many cultures – and witnessing it get extinguished could be a particularly terrifying event.
Tamotsu Ito/Shutterstock.com

To restore our soils, feed the microbes

Healthy soil teems with bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms that help store carbon and fend off plant diseases. To restore soil, scientists are finding ways to foster its microbiome.
A red fox listening for prey under the snow in Yellowstone National Park. Noise can affect foxes and other animals that rely on their hearing when they hunt. Neal Herbert/NPS

Human noise pollution is disrupting parks and wild places

A recent study finds that noise from human activities is intruding into many parks and other protected areas. Creating quiet zones and noise corridors can help reduce impacts from noise pollution.
People currently speak 7,000 languages around the globe. Michael Gavin

Why do human beings speak so many languages?

There's little research into origins of the geographic patterns of language diversity. A new model exploring processes that shaped Australia's language diversity provides a template for investigators.
Lake Powell, photographed April 12, 2017. The white ‘bathtub ring’ at the cliff base indicates how much higher the lake reached at its peak, nearly 100 feet above the current level. Patti Weeks

Climate change is shrinking the Colorado River

The Colorado River supplies water to millions of people and irrigates thousands of miles of farmland. New research warns that climate change is likely to magnify droughts in the Colorado Basin.

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