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In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

🎧 Don't Call Me Resilient, EP 5

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

Students of School Section #13 with teacher, Verlyn Ladd, who taught at the school from 1939 to 1958. Class of 1951, Buxton, Raleigh Township, Ontario. (Buxton National Historic Site & Museum)

Black History: How racism in Ontario schools today is connected to a history of segregation

An 1850 act permitted the creation of separate schools for Protestants, Catholics and for any five Black families. Some white people used the act to force Black students into separate institutions.
Ministries of education need to embed ongoing anti-racist training into their teacher education programs. Short-term anti-bias training has little impact. Here, a school school in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Short-term anti-racist training is not enough to counter systemic racism in Canadian education

COVID-19 has exposed how systemic racism affects the lives of many racialized students in Canada. But what are some possible solutions?
Temporary migrant workers in Canada are facing COVID-19 while dealing with an immigration system that leaves them vulnerable. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

COVID-19’s impact on migrant workers adds urgency to calls for permanent status

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought further suffering to migrant workers in Canada already experiencing the abuses of discriminatory immigration policies and poor working conditions.
The health and well-being of temporary foreign workers in the seafood industry in Atlantic Canada are disregarded in favour of business and economic concerns. (Paul Einerhand/Unsplash)

Profits trump COVID-19 protections for migrant seafood workers in Atlantic Canada

Debates about public safety and temporary foreign workers continue without input from those whose health is most affected. Migrant workers themselves are largely invisible amid discussions about risk.
A group of boys abducted by Boko Haram in Katsina State, northern Nigeria, after their release in December 2020. EPA

The Conversation Weekly

Nigeria: why do children keep getting kidnapped?

Plus, why women join Al-Shabaab in Kenya. Listen to episode 12 of The Conversation Weekly podcast.
A man is arrested during a protest against Hong Kong’s National Security Law in July 2020. Miguel Candela/EPA

The Conversation Weekly

Leaving Hong Kong after China’s clampdown

Plus new research finds a way to speed up the search for dark matter. Listen to episode 4 of The Conversation Weekly.

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