Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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In Rome, 70 per cent of ingredients in school meals are required by law to be organic. In Brazil, food is a constitutional right for children. Canada lags shamefully behind. (Shutterstock)

How to make a national school food program happen

There would be many benefits from a national school food program, including a chance to teach children healthy eating habits that could last a lifetime. Why can't it happen?
Activists protest against the acquisition of the U.S. agrochemical company Monsanto by the German Bayer company in Bonn, Germany, Friday, May 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

With Monsanto, Bayer will need more Aspirin

Bayer, the new owner of Monsanto, will need to up its PR efforts, in the wake of last week's legal ruling on glyphosate weedkillers.
Khalid Al-Falih Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources of Saudi Arabia, has said the diplomatic dispute won’t affect oil exports to Canada. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)

Saudi showdown spotlights Canada’s energy insecurity

Saudi Arabia has said it won't curb the flow of oil to Canada, but the Maritimes should think more seriously about replacing the Saudi supply with crude from more trusted sources.
New research shows the risk of lung cancer slowly increases five to 10 years after a breast radiation treatment; a form of brachytherapy developed in Canada is the safest treatment to reduce this risk. (Shutterstock)

The risk of lung cancer for young breast cancer survivors

New research reveals the risks of lung cancer after breast cancer radiotherapy and identifies the best treatment to reduce these risks.
Rwandan students on grounds of the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village near Rwamagana, in Rwanda., 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Silence can be healing for Rwandan youth born of genocide rape

Is it always good to talk about violent pasts? Sixty Rwandan youths participated in a research project that aimed to understand the perspectives of people born of rapes committed during the genocide
Lisa MacLeod, Ontario’s minister of children, community and social services, announces an end to the province’s basic income pilot project on July 31, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Basic income: A no-brainer in economic hard times

Research shows that guaranteed basic income programs spur economies and improve mental and physical health. That's why Ontario's decision to scrap the province's pilot project is such a bad idea.
It’s barbecue season, a time of year that usually makes the meat industry happy. But an increasing number of Canadians, especially those under 35, are cutting out meat from their diets – a trend that should be causing serious alarm for meat producers. (Shutterstock)

The rise of the conscious carnivore

There have been an increasing number of reported anti-meat incidents around the world as more consumers second-guess their relationship with animal proteins. How can the meat industry adjust?
U.S. President Donald Trump gives North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a thumbs up during their meeting at a resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Casino Diplomacy: The Trump game that everyone loses

Donald Trump is unmoved by high risks and wild odds, apparently feeling that his sheer cunning will always win, including, now, in geopolitics — his latest casino.
No one really knows for certain what the market potential is for cannabis, much less for edibles, but growth opportunities are palatable. (Shutterstock)

The trouble with edibles

Cannabis-infused food products could shake up the food industry.
A different decision from the Supreme Court of Canada on inter-provincial trade barriers could have, among other things, finally forced politicians to deal with the country’s problematic supply management system for the dairy and poultry sectors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The measly $292.50 that could have transformed Canada’s agrifood sector

The Gérard Comeau case was never just about beer. It was essentially about enabling Canada's domestic economy across the country to thrive. Here's how the Supreme Court of Canada got it so wrong.
Plastic debris strewn across a beach. (USFWS)

How to clean up our universal plastic tragedy

We're drowning in plastics. With governments setting un-ambitious targets, corporations are now listening to consumers who are demanding less plastic packaging and food containers.
U.S. President Donald Trump left the recent G7 summit in a fury about Justin Trudeau and vowing an escalated trade war. Canadians are responding by going Trump-free at the grocery stores – but it will likely be short-lived. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Canadians are going Trump-free – until it becomes too expensive

Every now and then, Canadians will take a stand against the U.S. by choosing Canadian items over American ones at the grocery store. Unless they cost more -- and most often, they do.
You’re not imagining things. The quantities of packaged foods really are shrinking as food manufacturers try to avoid hiking prices. Shrinkflation however is beginning to irritate consumers who feel they’re being cheated. (Shutterstock)

Shrinkflation: When less is not more at the grocery store

Canadians are bargain-hunters when it comes to food, and so food manufacturers try to keep prices low. But does that mean they should engage in 'shrinkflation?'
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr)

New fishing rules aim to protect Gulf of St. Lawrence right whales

After 17 North Atlantic right whales were killed or caught in fishing gear in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2017, the Canadian government set new rules for the snow crab and lobster fisheries.

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