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McMaster University

Founded in 1887, McMaster University is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading research-intensive universities. Our researchers are committed to advancing human and societal health and well-being.

Ranked 83rd overall in the 2016 Academic Ranking of World Universities, McMaster is the home of problem-based learning – our signature teaching method. Pioneered at McMaster and adopted by institutions around the world, this innovative approach opens young minds to new ideas and hones the critical thinking skills needed to create healthy communities in a complex and changing world.

At McMaster, collaborative thinking is a gateway to greater intelligence and greater optimism. In short, it’s helping us create a brighter world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 201 articles

Bien que l’usage du masque en tissu soit assez généralisé, de nombreuses interrogations subsistent. (Unsplash/Vera Davidova)

Tout savoir sur les masques anti Covid-19 en tissu, en cinq questions

Les épidémiologistes ont passé en revue 25 études sur les masques en tissu. Voici ce qu’ils ont découvert sur leur efficacité, leurs raisons d’être et comment ils protègent – ou pas.
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Carson City Airport on Oct. 18, 2020, in Carson City, Nev. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Can America survive the re-election of Donald Trump?

Americans can survive a second Trump term if they resurrect a language of critique and possibility that draws from history and shields the U.S. from authoritarianism.
Although cloth masks have been widely adopted, many people still have questions about them. (Usplash/Vera Davidova)

COVID-19 masks FAQs: How can cloth stop a tiny virus? What’s the best fabric? Do they protect the wearer?

Epidemiologists reviewed 25 studies of cloth face masks. Here’s what they found out about how well they work, why they work, who they protect and why the mosquito and chain-link fence analogy is wrong.
People march towards Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland’s office in Toronto during a rally led by current and former international students calling for changes to immigration rules during COVID-19 on Sept. 12, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

COVID-19 has hardened Canadian views on immigration

Pandemic fears could permanently harden Canadian attitudes toward immigration, and generate pressure to reduce the number of yearly arrivals.
British Columbia’s Chief Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides an update on the coronavirus pandemic on Sept. 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Even in 2020, a double standard is still applied to women in the spotlight

Women in visible leadership positions are subject to personal attacks as less competent and reliable than their male colleagues. Acknowledging this double standard is the first step in addressing it.
About one-third of Canada’s workforce are also caregivers, most often to aging parents or parents-in-law. (Shutterstock)

COVID-19’s silver lining? Creating a caregiver-friendly work culture

Changes to working life created by COVID-19 give employers an opportunity to embrace a caregiver-friendly work culture, supporting the millions of Canadians who juggle employment and informal caring.
President Donald Trump speaks during an event on judicial appointments at the White House on Sept. 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump aligns ignorance with bigotry as he attempts to rewrite history

Donald Trump’s attack on racial injustice is an attempt to replace historical consciousness with historical amnesia. It's a racialized politics of organized forgetting.
About 150 nursing union members show support for long-term care workers at the Orchard Villa Long-Term Care in Pickering, Ont., in June 2020. The facility was hit hard by COVID-19 infections. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

How women are changing the face of Canada’s union leadership

Unions must continue to try to recruit and sustain a critical mass of women, particularly visible minority and LBGTQ women, into leadership roles in the years to come.
Immersive and collaborative lab experiences are now possible online, and in the future they will complement in-person lab work. (Shuttterstock)

5 ways university education is being reimagined in response to COVID-19

Before the pandemic, only a fraction of students made use of the wide range of curricular and extracurricular experiential learning opportunities, but through online engagement that can change.
U.S. President Donald Trump waves a Vietnam flag as he meets with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc, waving an American flag, in Hanoi in February 2019. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Why some Vietnamese Americans support Donald Trump

Despite the racial unrest that has rocked the U.S. for months, President Donald Trump finds support among some racialized communities, including Vietnamese Americans. Why?
A server wears a face mask as he takes an order on an outdoor patio in Montréal in July 2020. Anti-mask sentiment is beginning to surface in Canada as it has in the United States. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Canada is not immune to the politics of coronavirus masks

Masks are widely recognized as a partisan issue in the United States, but an ongoing study of public opinion in Canada shows that they are becoming politicized here as well.
Many disabled people are facing difficulties maintaining and forming intimate relationships during COVID-19. (Shutterstock)

COVID-19 has isolated disabled people from family, love, sex

Even before the pandemic, disabled people reported feeling socially isolated and lonely. Their plight has only been exacerbated by responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.
While Canadian moms are still doing the lion’s share of child care and housework, in the early days of the pandemic, Canadian dads stepped up their efforts. (Shutterstock)

Canadian dads are doing more at home than before the coronavirus pandemic

Canadian fathers increased their share of work at home — in housework and in child care — in the early days of the pandemic as work and routines put pressures on the family.
Canada’s budgeting process needs to regard vaccination programs, to name just one example, the same way it regards investments in physical infrastructure like bridges and highways. (CDC/Unsplash)

The coronavirus shows we should treat public health the same as public works

Canada needs to reform budgeting and reporting methods to recognize the true underlying nature and value of expenditures on social infrastructure.

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