University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 429 articles

A migrant covered with a blanket passes in front of dumped garbage outside the Moria refugee camp on the island of Lesbos, Greece, Jan. 21, 2020. (AP Photo/Aggelos Barai)

Refugees at increased risk of coronavirus due to barriers to healthcare

Based on how other diseases have moved through refugee camps, there is an urgent need to protect refugees in camps and informal settlements from COVID-19.
Les mères ressentent la pression de devoir à la fois travailler et assumer la plupart des tâches parentales. Shutterstock

Pandémie : les femmes font moins de recherche que les hommes

La fermeture des écoles et des services de garde en raison de la pandémie a eu un impact sur les mères universitaires. Elles sont moins en mesure de mener des recherches et d’écrire des articles.
Home health worker Mass Joof adjusts the pillow for Eric McGuire in Franklin, Mass., on March 25, 2020. Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

How coronavirus could forever change home health care, leaving vulnerable older adults without care and overburdening caregivers

Home health care is a much trickier question after COVID-19, and that becomes an issue for millions of older people who rely on home health care, as well as the workers who care for them.
A market area in Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, crowded with people despite the coronavirus pandemic, May 12, 2020. hmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Megacity slums are incubators of disease – but coronavirus response isn’t helping the billion people who live in them

COVID-19 is spreading fast through not only the world's richest cities but also its poorest, ravaging slum areas where risk factors like overcrowding and poverty accelerate disease transmission.
Scotland is making strides in improving its population’s social and physical well-being — by taking children’s early learning and care outside. (Shutterstock)

Scotland’s outdoor play initiative has some lessons for the rest of the world

Scotland is undertaking a child-care initiative to double the number of fully funded child-care hours available to parents, and outdoor play is part of it.
By using technology to curb the spread of COVID-19, governments undertake the risky venture of undermining human rights. (Shutterstock)

Technology threatens human rights in the coronavirus fight

As governments consider the use of surveillance technologies to trace and contain the spread of COVID-19, it is important to consider human rights in the implementation.
A Kashmiri Muslim man offers prayers on the banks of Dal Lake on the second day of Ramadan during lockdown in Srinagar, Indian occupied Kashmir, April 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

India uses coronavirus pandemic to exploit human rights in Kashmir

Although the United Nations has called for a global ceasefire during the pandemic, Kashmiris are bracing for a new wave of violence as India accelerates its settler-colonial ambitions.
A worker from Sanctuary, a Christian charitable organization, tends to homeless people in their tents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on April 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Why religious freedom stokes coronavirus protests in the U.S., but not Canada

Canadian and American religious groups are responding very differently to coronavirus public health measures. Why? In Canada, health care is more widely regarded as a public good and a right.
Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam and Deputy Chief Public Health Officer Howard Njoo are reflected in a computer screen showing date on Canada’s COVID-19 situation during a news conference in Ottawa on April 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Race-based health data urgently needed during the coronavirus pandemic

Gathering race-based data during the coronavirus pandemic is essential for Indigenous communities, racialized people and those with disabilities and mental health challenges.
Anthony Fauci, left, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks with Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, before testifying at a congressional hearing in March. Fauci has had a higher public profile during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Even during the coronavirus pandemic, the role of public health workers is unrecognized

Those who work in the background to keep everyone healthy — public health nurses, health inspectors, laboratory techs and epidemiologists — deserve recognition in the fight against COVID-19.

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