Brock University

Located in Ontario’s scenic Niagara region, Brock University is among a handful of global campuses situated within a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, overlooking the city of St. Catharines from the brow of the Niagara Escarpment. Brock has more than 1,500 faculty and staff, and nearly 19,000 undergraduate and graduate students, including international students from more than 100 countries. Known for a highly-rated student experience, Brock offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate programs across seven faculties. Brock is a leader in experiential education and transdisciplinary research, is home to 10 Canada Research Chairs, and Canada’s only university with a CL3 containment lab. In terms of academic excellence, Brock is top-5 among all Ontario universities for 3M National Teaching Fellowships.

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An illustration called “British Burning Washington” depicting the White House on fire in 1814. U.S. Library of Congress

What Donald Trump doesn’t know about the War of 1812

Donald Trump was under the mistaken impression that Canadians once burned down the White House. But he's not the only one who has a fuzzy sense of the history of the War of 1812.
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne acknowledges her supporters following the defeat of her party in the provincial election on June 7. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

How homophobia, misogyny & race played a role in the Ontario election

How has sexuality, gender and race played a role in the career of Kathleen Wynne, who stepped down as Ontario Liberal leader after her party's disastrous showing in the provincial election?
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. in October 2017. Trump’s tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel simply reflect a broader U.S. philosophy on international trade, and that doesn’t bode well for Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How Trump’s tariffs are much bigger than Trump

The underlying problem with Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum isn't Trump. It's the increasing willingness by the U.S. to impose its will on its neighbours amid rising economic nationalism.
A health-care worker wears virus protective gear at a treatment center in Bikoro Democratic Republic of Congo, on May 13, 2018. (AP Photo/John Bompengo)

Stopping Ebola before the virus goes viral

History, and math, tell us that the Ebola virus spreads exponentially quickly. This means Ebola is a global problem and all nations need to rally -- to stop the epidemic fast.
Washington Capitals left wing Jakub Vrana jumps into the arms of Alex Ovechkin (8) after scoring the go-ahead goal during Game 5 in the second round of the NHL Stanley Cup hockey playoffs. Cheer for the Caps this Stanley Cup final if you’re hoping the stock market performs well. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Hoping for a bullish stock market? Cheer for the Washington Capitals

The Stanley Cup winner has proven to be a weirdly accurate stock market predictor. That's why we should cheer for the Washington Capitals this year.
In this November 2017 photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping prepare to shake their hands after a joint news conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. The China-U.S. trade conflict is about far more than trade; it’s about American efforts to change how China deals with the world. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The China-U.S. conflict is about much more than trade

The recent U.S. trade mission to China failed, allowing no space for future compromise. What follows will likely be much more than a simple trade war.
Toronto could learn a lot from Brazil following the flawed and opaque consultation process to develop parts of the city’s waterfront. (Shutterstock)

Quayside Toronto project proves that smart city talks must be transparent

Toronto’s Quayside smart city project needs a new, truly consultative process. An innovative method used by Brazil to develop its landmark Internet Bill of Rights may be the answer.
Both first- and second-generation immigrants in British Columbia and Ontario outperformed their non-immigrant counterparts in science literacy, in the 2015 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Programme for International Student Assessment. (Shutterstock)

The secrets of immigrant student success

First and second-generation immigrants perform well in many Canadian provinces that take an "accommodation" approach.
This photo, provided May 10, 2018, by the government-controlled Syrian Central Military Media, shows Israeli missiles in the sky as others hit air defence positions and other military bases in Damascus, Syria. (Syrian Central Military Media, via AP)

Israeli rocket experience shows bomb shelters matter as much as interceptors

Flashy interceptor systems attract media and government attention. But bomb shelters and warning systems are at least as important in the midst of missile strikes.
The male cardinal tenderly feeding his mate is just one example of the hard work wild animals undertake in springtime. That work often benefits humans. (Shutterstock)

How the hard work of wild animals benefits us too

Wild animals are hard at work this spring. Here's how their hard labour benefits humans, and why we should be more appreciative.
A man smokes a large marijuana joint during the annual 4/20 marijuana celebration on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on April 20, 2018. With legalization ahead, provinces are taking different approaches in how they sell weed to the public. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Buying pot in Ontario in 2018 will be like buying booze in 1928

Canadian provinces are choosing various approaches to cannabis sales as legalization approaches. Ontario's will combine aspects of computer stores, wine boutiques and post-prohibition liquor outlets.
The railway at the centre of the 2013 Lac-Megantic explosion, Montreal Maine and Atlantic, was recently ordered to pay fines totalling $1.25 million after being convicted of violating the Fisheries Act due to crude oil leaking into nearby bodies of water. Employers and companies are increasingly being held responsible for workplace accidents. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

The National Day of Mourning is a reminder workplaces should be safe

Every day people around the world go to work expecting to return home safely to their families. But the reality is that many never return due to workplace accidents that could have been prevented.
In this November 2017 photo, U.S. President Donald Trump talks to Chinese President Xi Jinping during a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. The brewing China-U.S. trade conflict features two leaders who have expressed friendship but are equally determined to pursue their nation’s interests. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Why China should have chosen honesty in its U.S. trade war

“Honesty is the best policy” is hardly a hallmark of the Trump régime, so China would have been smart to pursue a more honest, less manipulative path in its simmering trade war with the U.S.
An Israeli soldier walks next to an Iron Dome rocket defense battery near the southern city of Sderot, Israel, in 2015. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)

As missiles fly, a look at Israel’s Iron Dome interceptor

Iron Dome rocket interceptors achieved international fame during Israel’s 2012 and 2014 Gaza conflicts. Research suggests the systems provided substantial protection in 2014, but not two years earlier.
People in South Korea watch a news program on TV about the meeting between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and Chinese President Xi Jinping in late March. Kim and Xi sought to portray strong ties between the neighbours and long-time allies despite a recent chill. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

War games, slow trains and the spectre of a Trump-Kim summit

Kim Jong-un's surprise recent visit to Beijing and Xi Jinping was an awkward get-together that didn't address the elephant in the room -- Kim's possible face-to-face meeting soon with Donald Trump.
Chinese President Xi Jinping waves as he leaves a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing recently. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

What Xi Jinping’s power grab means for Canada

Canada has reportedly committed more than $1 billion to a Chinese investment bank. Is Canada unwittingly serving as a 'useful idiot' in Xi Jinping's grand plans to restore China's lost greatness?
In this April 2017 photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks at his company’s annual developer conference in San Jose, Calif. Zuckerberg says he will testify to U.S. Congress about the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica data breach. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File

Why not nationalize Facebook?

Facebook has become a key part of the world's infrastructure, not just another tech company. It's time to start treating it that way.
Horses graze on a ranch as the sun rises near Smithers, B.C., in September 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Getting the facts about work in horse stables

Horses have played a major role in our culture and have worked hard for human beings for eons. But there's high turnover and pressing labour issues in horse stables. It's time to figure out why.

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