University of British Columbia

The University of British Columbia is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world. Since 1915, UBC’s West Coast spirit has embraced innovation and questioned the status quo. With close to 63,000 students from 160 countries and more than 5,400 faculty on two campuses in Vancouver and the Okanagan, UBC is a place where bold thinking develops into ideas that can change the world. Its entrepreneurial perspective encourages students, staff and faculty to challenge convention, lead discovery and explore new ways of learning.

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A man on a skateboard and a young woman pass large letters spelling out UBC at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., November 2015. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Drop tuition fees: University students face a precarious future amid COVID-19

Canada should invest robustly in students' post-secondary education. Data about effects of the pandemic and how students balance classes and work show why we urgently need this investment.
Online shaming leads to personal attacks and resignations, not structural change. (Miguel Bruna/Unsplash)

Twitter shaming won’t change university power structures

Bringing change to universities needs to focus on systems, not people. Although online shaming is effective at removing people from their positions, it doesn't change systems.
The myth of Asians being good at math both encourages a “blame-the-victim” approach to math failure and imposes significant psycho-social pressure on high-achieving students. (Chuttersnap/Unsplash)

Racist stereotyping of Asians as good at math masks inequities and harms students

A Vancouver study found Mandarin-speaking girls were more likely to be eligible for university than Cantonese-speaking boys. High-achieving students were from wealthier families who had tutors.
Mental health issues resulting from COVID-19 and efforts to contain it are the fourth wave of the pandemic. (Pixabay, Canva)

Mental health impact of coronavirus pandemic hits marginalized groups hardest

The pandemic's mental health toll is not distributed equally. Its impact is disproportionately felt by racialized groups, Indigenous Peoples, people with disabilities and those experiencing poverty.
Italian fishers unload a fishing net aboard a trawler during a fishing trip in the Tyrrhenian Sea in April 2020. Fishing subsidies are resulting in serious overfishing. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Fisheries subsidies fuel ocean depletion and hurt coastal communities

Everyone who cares about marine biodiversity, fish, fishers, coastal communities and fishing industry workers of today and tomorrow must push for the end of fisheries subsidies.
Le niveau de mercure dans les sardines du Pacifique pourrait augmenter de 14 % si les émissions de gaz à effet de serre continuent de croître. Shutterstock

Les changements climatiques et la surpêche font augmenter le niveau de mercure dans le poisson

La réglementation a permis de réduire les émissions de mercure à l’échelle mondiale, mais les risques pour les écosystèmes océaniques et la santé humaine pourraient s’aggraver.
Stressors put on children and adolescents as a result of the pandemic response may have long-lasting effects on their health and well-being. (Shutterstock)

The long-term biological effects of COVID-19 stress on kids’ future health and development

The pandemic response has put the long-term health and well-being of children and adolescents at risk, with the possibility of seismic shifts in population health if we do not act.
Empty shelves in a grocery store in Toronto on March 22, 2020 as customers stock up on dry goods and shelf-stable foods. (Shutterstock)

Supply chain innovation can reduce coronavirus food shortages

Using innovative technologies like Bitcoin and automation can help protect our food supply chains from disruptions like the one caused by the current coronavirus pandemic.
The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association is calling on health authorities to “implement a more compassionate approach to end-of-life visitations … during the COVID-19 pandemic.” (Shutterstock)

Coronavirus public health restrictions shouldn’t mean dying alone

Preventing people from dying alone in a pandemic takes ingenuity and money, but it’s the right thing to do.
Recommendations suggest babies be introduced to food allergens around age six months. (Pixabay)

Peanuts, eggs and your baby: How to introduce food allergens during the coronavirus pandemic

Introducing food allergens early is the best way to prevent food allergies from developing. Even in a pandemic, the benefits outweigh the very small risk of a severe reaction requiring emergency care.

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