University of British Columbia

The University of British Columbia is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world. Since 1915, UBC’s West Coast spirit has embraced innovation and questioned the status quo. With close to 63,000 students from 160 countries and more than 5,400 faculty on two campuses in Vancouver and the Okanagan, UBC is a place where bold thinking develops into ideas that can change the world. Its entrepreneurial perspective encourages students, staff and faculty to challenge convention, lead discovery and explore new ways of learning.

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Ellie, a four-year-old labradoodle, enjoys many pats from students as part of the Building Academic Retention through K9s program (B.A.R.K.) at the University of British Columbia. (Freya L. L. Green)

Dog therapy: What I’ve learned overseeing 60 canine campus teams

When students are given the option to stay with a dog until they feel their stress is sufficiently reduced, they visit on average 35 minutes.
Les femmes ne forment que le tiers des scientifiques dans le monde. Malgré les avancées des dernières années, elles demeurent moins enclines que les hommes à opter pour une telle carrière. Shutterstock

Femmes en sciences: il faut un effort mondial, dit une chercheure

Les hommes sont encore bien plus nombreux que les femmes dans les sciences et les technos, mais des efforts sont faits mondialement pour y pallier.
Research shows that physical activity and avoiding screens before bed are both strategies to protect your teenagers’ sleep. (Unsplash/Andrea Tummons)

How much sleep do teenagers really need?

When teenagers sleep for less than eight hours a night, they are at increased risk of suicide, being overweight, high rates of injury, poor sustained attention and low school grades.
For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again. (Shutterstock)

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Researchers have successfully used 'epidural spinal cord stimulation' with patients to improve bowel function, restore blood pressure control and increase upper-body exercise capacity.
In this October 2015 photo, German federal police officers guide a group of migrants on their way after crossing the border between Austria and Germany. Once granted citizenship, newcomers face near-impossible hurdles to reunite their families. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Citizens in the West should care about discriminatory immigration policies

It's important to unearth how discriminatory immigration policy, largely invisible to the general public, undermines citizens’ rights and position.
The South Korean government has decided to dim its office lights at 7 p.m. and shorten its work week hoping to encourage young people to date again. A favourite lover’s activity is to put a lock on Namsan mountain’s Seoul Tower to declare love. Shutterstock

Why young people in South Korea are staying single despite efforts to spark dating

South Korea is facing a low fertility trend. Valentine's Day serves as a reminder to help ease the domestic burden on young women so they can consider partnerships again.
The boy who went viral: Nick Sandmann shown here in his MAGA cap with fellow students next to Indigenous elder playing the drum. Instagram/ka_ya11

Why the media loves the white racist story

It’s easier to accuse someone else of racism than it is to challenge the racist and colonial systems we participate in.
In 2017, Saskatchewan’s auditor general showed that a private pay MRI program actually increased wait times for scans rather than the promised reduction. Here, an MRI machine is prepared at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital on May 1, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Why private, for-profit health care is a terrible idea

A two-tier, for-profit health-care system will not end "hallway medicine" in Ontario or elsewhere; evidence from around the world shows that private payment increases wait times for the majority.
The Chronic Pain Association of Canada has received money from Eli Lilly Canada Inc., Purdue Canada Inc. and Merck Frosst Canada. A blog post on the association’s website contains messages favourable to increased opioid use. (Flickr/Ajay Suresh)

Why Big Pharma must disclose payments to patient groups

Evidence shows that opioid manufacturers fund patient advocacy groups in Canada, distorting policies to protect public health.
If citizens think they’ll personally and financially benefit from a carbon tax, maybe politicians would take action. Thomas Hafeneth/Unsplash

Want citizens to care about climate change? Write them a cheque

Millions of people worldwide are either indifferent to a carbon tax or opposed. If citizens were motivated by potential carbon dividends, maybe politicians would finally take action on climate change.
Research suggests that family approval has a significant impact on relationship stability. (Shutterstock)

When you have two lovers, the holidays can be tricky

Many people are 'polyamorous' -- they have two or more romantic partners. Often this is challenging to disclose to family.
The growing trend of sexualised injection meth use — colloquially referred to as ‘slamming’ — is a growing public health concern due to the dual risk of transmission of HIV and other blood-borne viruses via both injection and sexual transmission. (Shutterstock)

Gay men who use crystal meth need integrated care

The sexualized use of crystal meth by gay men is one of the key drivers of rising HIV rates and has many negative mental health consequences. Integrated sexual and substance use care is vital.
‘Wait, we’re WHAT?’ Why laws that consider live-in couples to be married may be well-intentioned, but erode free choice and put pressure on relationships. Rawpixel/Unsplash

‘We’re WHAT?’ Why marriage default laws are misguided

Reforming laws relating to unmarried couples is long overdue. But it can also represent an affront couples’ autonomy and erodes the freedom to choose to live in non-marital situations.
People living with HIV/AIDS all over the world are still struggling with stigma due to perceptions of the virus as dark and shameful. Here a Filipino man lights candles at a World AIDS Day even in Quezon city, Philippines in 2016. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

What you need to know about HIV/AIDS today

Researchers from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS share the latest research on HIV prevention, treatment and stigma.
Protesters are seen outside an event Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was attending in Calgary on Nov. 22, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta oil communities need a transition plan, not new pipelines

Canada has joined the international community in calling for a transition away from fossil fuels. There is no reason to wait for more painful disruption before planning for that transition.
New research indicates women are much happier when they work with other women, as opposed to men. Here a scene from the set of ‘Ocean’s Eight’ with Cate Blanchett and Rihanna looking happy working together.

Women feel better when they work with other women

Men have defended gender segregation by treating women who cross over into male-dominated occupations with scorn and ridicule.

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