Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

D.B. Tindall studies contention over environmental issues, including topics such as forestry, wilderness preservation, fisheries, and climate change. A major focus of his research has been environmental movements in British Columbia, and Canada, and in this context, the interrelationships between social networks, movement identification, and participation. His research has focused on various aspects of environmentalism including, values, attitudes, and opinions, activism and conservation behavior, media coverage of environmental issues, gender issues, and social networks and environmentalism. His current research, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, focuses on sociological aspects of contention over climate change in Canada, including perceptions about climate change, views about climate justice, and social processes affecting policies for dealing with climate change, and media coverage of climate change issues.

Current Research:
Structural Social Psychological Bases of Individual Participation in the B.C. Environmental Movement.

Media and Symbolic Aspects of the Conflict Over Old Growth Forests.

Structural Social Psychological Aspects of the Conflict Over Forestry and Conservation on Vancouver Island.

The Sociological Bases of Forest Values.

Experience

  • –present
    Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia