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Queen's University, Ontario

Established in 1841 and one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s today is a mid-sized university that provides a transformative student learning experience within a research-intensive environment A member of the prestigious U15 group of research-intensive Canadian universities, Queen’s conducts leading-edge research in areas of critical concern. Queen’s is also a member of the Matariki Network, an international group of research-intensive universities with a strong shared commitment to the undergraduate and graduate student learning experience.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 277 articles

People are seen at the Mount Pleasant farmers market in Vancouver, B.C., where measures are in place to limit the number of people permitted at a time due to COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

A local food diet can make you and your community healthier during COVID-19

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increased interest in local food. This demand could be leveraged to help develop community resilience and encourage healthier diets.
Women at the Fraser Valley Institution for women were moved into cells like this after the minimum security wing was shut down for approximately two months. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Worsening conditions in prisons during COVID-19 further marginalize criminalized women

When minimum security units are closed in prisons, it is both a human rights violation and a reduction in available choices for women sentenced to prison time.
Patients who were overweight and obese had lower mortality rates following cardiac surgery than those with BMIs in the normal or underweight range. (Shutterstock)

The obesity paradox: Obese patients fare better than others after heart surgery

For patients recovering from heart surgery, being overweight or moderately obese appears to be an advantage over being underweight or even having a normal BMI.
The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in increased adoption of communication and network technologies. (Shutterstock)

Digital technologies will help build resilient communities after the coronavirus pandemic

Internet technologies and the devices that enable information access and transfer are useful in crisis management. Accessing these readily available digital technologies can help community resiliency.
COVID-19 has not influenced a change in some students’ partying behaviors. Here, two young people talk at a bar in Marseille, France, Sept. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Daniel Cole)

COVID-19 outbreaks at universities: Students need safe places to socialize, not partying bans

Both university and government policy-makers need to re-tool their messaging to students about off-campus socializing to shape more positive mental health and COVID-19 outcomes.
Scarecrows float in an oilsands tailings pond to keep birds from landing, in Fort McMurray, Alta., in June 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

New technology makes wastewater from the oilsands industry safer for fish

New regulations will allow oilsands companies to release 1.3 trillion litres of liquid waste into the Athabasca River in 2022. A new technology could clean the wastewater before it's let go.
Members of the Oasis Senior Supportive Living Program pole walking in their community.

Beyond long-term care: The benefits of seniors’ communities that evolve on their own

Naturally occurring retirement communities, or NORCs, are unplanned communities that have a high proportion of older residents. They may be critical to finding housing solutions for aging Canadians.
Friaaz Azeez gets tested for COVID-19 by a health-care worker at a pop-up testing centre at the Islamic Institute of Toronto in Scarborough, Ont., on May 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

‘What do you mean, it was a false positive?’ Making sense of COVID-19 tests and terminology

Understanding terms like sensitivity and specificity can help us make sense of COVID-19 testing, the accuracy of tests and what the results mean.
Co-founders Craig (left) and Marc Kielburger introduce Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau as they appear at the WE Day celebrations in Ottawa in November 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The other WE Charity scandal: White saviourism

An intense controversy over sending Canadian teens to Cuba to cut sugar cane in the 1970s raises questions about why WE Charity's international development approach hasn't been controversial for years.
Le pétrole est aspiré d’un ruisseau près de la rivière Kalamazoo dans le Michigan, en juillet 2010. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Des scientifiques ont intentionnellement déversé du pétrole dans un lac canadien

Personne ne veut d’une marée noire dans son jardin. Mais pour comprendre le sort et les effets réels du bitume dilué – un produit des sables bitumineux – c’est ce que certains scientifiques ont fait.
Some passengers wear face masks as they commute on the metro in Montréal in July 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

How to calmly navigate personal interactions during COVID-19

As we venture out into the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, treating each interaction as a type of micro-negotiation provides a helpful road map for navigating potentially tricky situations.
Oil from a ruptured pipeline is vacuumed from a creek near the near the Kalamazoo River in Michigan, July 2010. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Why scientists intentionally spilled oil into a Canadian lake

No one wants an oil spill in their backyard. Yet to understand the real-world fate and effects of diluted bitumen — a Canadian oil sands product — that’s exactly what some scientists did.
Rhetoric that casts COVID-19 as a Chinese virus stigmatizes Asian people and plays into racist tropes of a ‘yellow peril.’ THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Coronavirus: The ‘yellow peril’ revisited

Stating that COVID-19 is a “Chinese” disease, dehumanizes and reinforces well-worn stereotypes of Chinese people as the "yellow peril."
El entonces presidente del Gobierno, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, en el acto de sanción de la reforma de la Constitución Española el 27 de septiembre de 2011. Wikimedia Commons / Moncloa

¿Qué es el consociativismo y por qué es la apuesta de Zapatero para rebajar la tensión territorial?

¿Debería España asumir prácticas consociativas para gestionar conflictos como el de Cataluña?
In this August 2017 photo, Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers greet migrants as they enter into Canada at an unofficial border crossing at the end of Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., on the Québec border. A federal court has invalidated Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Canadian court correctly finds the U.S. is unsafe for refugees

The Canadian government should send a clear signal that it cares about constitutional and international law, heed a Federal Court ruling and take steps to immediately suspend the STCA.
Un grand requin blanc mâle, un des animaux les plus puissants, photographié à Seal Island, en Afrique du Sud. L image iconique du requin est profondément ancrée dans l'esprit humain par le film «Jaws» de Steve Spielberg. Shutterstock

45 ans plus tard, voici pourquoi le thème musical des « Dents de la mer » inspire toujours la terreur

Le film « Jaws » s’ouvre sur un morceau de musique vraiment emblématique. Deux notes nous tiennent en haleine. Comment la musique manipule-t-elle nos émotions ?

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