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Queen's University, Ontario

Established in 1841 and one of Canada’s oldest degree-granting institutions, Queen’s today is a mid-sized university that provides a transformative student learning experience within a research-intensive environment A member of the prestigious U15 group of research-intensive Canadian universities, Queen’s conducts leading-edge research in areas of critical concern. Queen’s is also a member of the Matariki Network, an international group of research-intensive universities with a strong shared commitment to the undergraduate and graduate student learning experience.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 441 articles

Defence Minister Anita Anand chats with Armed Forces personnel in Halifax in November 2022. The government needs to focus on more action, less talk when it comes to defence policy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Canada needs to act on its existing defence policy, not review it repeatedly

Canada’s military faces financial, procurement, human resources and culture challenges. The federal government has known about them for years, so why another defence policy review?
The Foreign Ministers Josep Borrell of the EU, James Cleverly of Great Britain, Yoshimasa Hayashi of Japan, Antony Blinken of the U.S., Annalena Baerbock of Germany, Melanie Joly of Canada, Catherine Colonna of France, and Antonio Tajani of Italy, at the G7 Foreign Ministers’ Meeting in Münster, Germany, on Oct. 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

Canada should focus on building ties with countries that share its values — but tread carefully

Deliberately crafting economic relationships with countries that share similar political and social values with Canada has emerged as a tool to address current geopolitical issues.
Polish police officers search for missile wreckage in a farmer’s field near where a missile struck, killing two people in the village of Przewodów near the border with Ukraine, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

Ukraine war: Why the missile incident in Poland is a warning of things to come

The recent military mishap in Poland shows such incidents are bound to happen near war zones. We should be ready for them.
Whether you’re 16 going on 17 or 79 going on 80, singing classics and new numbers virtually with a group brings joy. (Shutterstock)

Puttin’ on the Ritz and improving well-being with older adults through virtual music theatre

I’m happy again: A pandemic-induced move to virtual music theatre presents a paradigm shift for the genre, yet reveals surprising benefits in facilitating new access to music in community.
Visa and Mastercard both recently agreed to remove their no-surcharge rule, leaving businesses free to pass these fees along to customers. (Shutterstock)

How Canada’s new credit card surcharge will affect consumers and businesses

Businesses can now pass credit card surcharge fees along to their customers. To help businesses predict how consumers will react to credit card surcharges, behavioural economics offers some answers.
Red mitochondria in airway cells become coated with green SARS-COV-2 proteins after viral infection: Researchers discovered that the virus that causes COVID-19 damages lungs by attacking mitochondria. (Stephen Archer)

How COVID-19 damages lungs: The virus attacks mitochondria, continuing an ancient battle that began in the primordial soup

COVID-19 causes lung injury and lowers oxygen levels in patients because the SARS-CoV-2 virus attacks cells’ mitochondria. This attack is a throwback to a primitive war between viruses and bacteria.
When politicians swear we might think they’re simply overcome with emotion. But there’s often more going on behind the language they use. (Shutterstock)

Politicians dropping the F-bomb: There’s more to it than you might think

Politicians dropping the f-bomb tend to be seen as acting out of emotion, but the way we use taboo language is often about what we can accomplish by violating rules.
Fossil fuel investors can use an obscure legal mechanism found in many international trade agreements to sue countries if their projects are blocked. curraheeshutter via Shutterstock

A secretive legal system lets fossil fuel investors sue countries over policies to keep oil and gas in the ground – podcast

Experts are concerned that a legal mechanism called investor-state dispute settlement could affect countries’ moves to cut fossil fuel emissions. Listen to The Conversation Weekly.
Building safer workplaces requires leaders who understand how years of resource constraints, unhealthy work environments, abuse from patients and a pandemic have contributed to overwhelming burnout and job dissatisfaction among workers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

How health-care leaders can foster psychologically safer workplaces

The future of our health system depends on recruiting and retaining passionate and highly skilled health-care workers. It’s essential to build work environments where they feel supported and safe.
Family of the victims of a series of stabbings on the James Smith Cree Nation reserve in Saskatchewan hug following a news conference in Saskatoon on Sept. 7. (AP Photo/Robert Bumsted)

Saskatchewan stabbings: Why Myles Sanderson was granted statutory release from prison

Myles Sanderson was given statutory release from prison prior to a stabbing rampage that left 10 people dead. But a legal expert says his case is unrepresentative of how people behave on this form of release.
Until the government acknowledges the critical role family physicians have in population health and on easing the burden on acute hospital care, pressures will only be relieved temporarily. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

With family doctors heading for the exits, addressing the crisis in primary care is key to easing pressure on emergency rooms

A strong primary care system keeps patients away from emergency departments and helps patients self-manage illnesses. But Ontario’s plan to ease pressure on emergency rooms ignores family medicine.

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