Menu Close

University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 135 articles

The EUV-SK1, developed by One Health Medical Technologies with subject matter experts from the University of Saskatchewan. (RMD Engineering, Inc.)

Keeping it local: The story behind a made-in-Saskatchewan COVID-19 emergency-use ventilator

How a veterinarian and a law professor joined a multidisciplinary team to help produce a made-in-Saskatchewan emergency-use ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Detail from ‘Birdsong’ by Cree-Métis artist Julie Flett, which won the 2020 TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award for most distinguished book. The story follows an intergenerational friendship and speaks to change in children’s lives. (Greystone Kids)

Picture this: These beautiful books help children read the world

A researcher who explored 500 picture books created by authors or illustrators living in Canada suggests books that are extraordinary in both text and illustration.
Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan applauds during a conference in Istanbul in July 2020 as lawmakers made speeches before voting on a bill that would give the government greater powers to regulate social media. (Turkish Presidency via AP)

Dissidents of the Turkish government are living in fear in Canada

As Turkey reaches around the world to spy on and intimidate dissidents, new research shows Turks living in Canada are fearful and make frequent changes in how they live to protect themselves.
The outside of a Mountain Equipment Co-op is seen in North Vancouver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The MEC debacle is a predictable and avoidable governance failure

MEC built a leadership team that lacked any obvious understanding of co-operatives and fostered a culture that started to see member involvement as a problem rather than a strength.
Bank of Canada Gov. Tiff Macklem speaks during a news conference at the Bank of Canada on Sept. 10, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The throne speech: Fiscal prudes are fretting about the wrong issues

While those on the left, right and middle worry about the federal deficit, the real world that we live in is in trouble. The fiscal prudes are fretting about the wrong issues.
Universities face pressure to ensure their graduate programs have a clear return on investment both for students and for taxpayers. Here, the Vancouver skyline behind a Canadian flag in North Vancouver, B.C., March 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Coronavirus halted years of research and Canada needs a strategy to fight back

Graduate students are suffering, public investments in research are at risk and we need to face implications of growing reliance on international graduate students when borders are harder to cross.
Municipal workers block the streets of the Medina neighbourhood of Dakar, Senegal, on March 22, 2020 as a bulldozer demolishes informal shops in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Sylvain Cherkaoui)

Why Africa needs to battle unique challenges to keep coronavirus numbers down

African countries face unique challenges in their efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19, but lessons learned in other regions where the coronavirus has already peaked may be helpful.
A pumpjack works at a well head on an oil and gas installation near Cremona, Alta. Albertans are frequently critical of Canada’s equalization program. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Why Canada’s equalization program needs a major overhaul

It's virtually impossible to determine if Canada's equalization program is succeeding or failing. That means it's in dire need of a major overhaul rather than small tweaks here and there.
Controversy erupted after a lecturer at the University of Alberta posted on Facebook in November that the Holomodor is a “myth.” Canada recognized the Holomodor — the death of millions of Ukrainians in 1932–33 due to Soviet policies — as an act of genocide in 2008. Here, the Holodomor Memorial, Kyiv, Ukraine. (Flickr/Matt Shalvatis)

Universities should stand up for integrity and public trust in university teaching

Those teaching in publicly funded universities should be held accountable for denying the public record, whether in their classrooms or beyond.
The ability of online retailers to offer next-day delivery service for an annual fee or at an affordable price has dynamically changed the retail business and shifted sales from in-store to online. (Clay Banks/Unsplash)

‘The Prime Effect’ means retailers must innovate during the holidays and beyond

Innovation is integral to the success of Canadian retailers and encouraging consumers to shop in stores as well as online. The big strategic risk is not innovating and failing, but failing to innovate.

Authors

More Authors