University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 81 - 100 of 112 articles

In Mozambique, gender-based violence, early marriage and early pregnancy all play a part in compromising the health of mothers and infants. (Nazeem Muhajarine)

New research partnership makes childbirth safer in Mozambique

Mozambique has one of the highest maternal death rates in the world. Researchers hope to reduce this, with an ambitious project aimed at empowering women and girls.
Donald Trump doesn’t liked to be reined in, which is why he has such a problem with trade deals like NAFTA. (The Associated Press)

New NAFTA or no NAFTA? How Trump’s ire could affect Canadian agri-food

Part of the purpose of trade deals is to prevent politicians from inserting politics into matters of commerce. Donald Trump is bucking that trend. What does it mean for Canada and NAFTA?
Exercise is recommended as an effective non-opioid strategy for non-cancer pain such as fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. Yet most adults living with chronic pain do not exercise. Or they exercise very little. (Shutterstock)

How exercise can help tackle the opioid crisis

Research shows that exercise offers promise -- as an alternative to prescription opioids -- for relieving chronic pain.
Social media has become a place of vitriolic myths about Indigenous peoples in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial for the killing of Colten Boushie. Here, a vigil in support of Colten Boushie’s family on Feb. 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Social media full of vitriolic myths in the aftermath of the Stanley trial

Social media posts since Gerald Stanley’s acquittal have been saturated with vitriolic rants and myths. If reconciliation is to be more than an aspiration, settlers must acknowledge our culpability.
Miniature of the duke of true love and his companions entertaining ladies. The Book of the Queen, c. 1410–1414, France (Paris), Harley 4431, f. 145 (Creative Commons)

The magic of love and sex

A scholar of medieval magic discusses the hope in magical techniques for finding love.
Canada’s Andi Naude, who came into the Olympics ranked No. 2 in the world in women’s mogul skiing, reacts after failing to complete her final run at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The agony of defeat: How Olympians can deal with failure

Failure is something all athletes need to deal with, especially when competing on the world stage that is the Olympics. Learning self-compassion can help athletes rebound from setbacks.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks to reporters in Toronto on Sept. 10, 2018. He’s vowing to invoke the seldom used notwithstanding clause in his fight to slash the size of Toronto city council. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov.

The history of the notwithstanding clause

The notwithstanding clause in Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seldom been used. But it's not totally gathering dust, and now Ontario Premier Doug Ford is threatening to wield it.
Protesters kick in the window at Concordia University as they try to stop a speech by former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Montreal in 2002. Netanyahu cancelled the speech citing security concerns. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Freedom of expression is under attack at our universities

In his new book "University Commons Divided," former University of Saskatchewan President Peter MacKinnon examines the attack on freedom of expression at Canadian universities.
A coyote cools off in the shade of a leafy suburb. Wildlife interactions with pets and humans can transfer disease, including the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. (Winston Wong/flickr)

If your pet has this tapeworm, it could kill you

A parasite found in coyotes, wolves and foxes is now spreading to dogs and their owners as its range expands across Canada.
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Scientists believe flight may influence their immune responses to coronoviruses, which cause fatal diseases such as SARS and MERS in humans. (Shutterstock)

Can bats help humans survive the next pandemic?

Scientific studies show that bats may carry "coronoviruses" causing SARS and MERS - without showing symptoms of disease. Could the bat immune system be key to human survival in future pandemics?
An infection prevention and control professional wipes her gloves with a bleach wipe during an ebola virus training in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Explainer: How we all benefit from the public health system

Infectious diseases pose a continual threat to Canadians. Ensuring the population stays healthy requires increasing investment in our public health system.
The Chalk River Laboratories in 2012. Canada’s role as a world leader in neutron-scattering is at risk because of a failure to invest in infrastructure renewal at the facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Why Canada must not be shut out of the neutron technology it invented

Canada is a world leader in the field of neutron scattering, winning a Nobel Prize in 1994 for its invention. But the looming shutdown of facilities at Chalk River puts us on the sidelines.
Egg donors, sperm donors and surrogates are critical participants and patients in the use of reproductive technologies - so why are their rights and heath repeatedly overlooked? (Shutterstock)

Egg donors and surrogates need high-quality care

Health Canada is drafting important regulations for assisted reproductive technologies. Initial documents treat egg donors and surrogates as little more than spare parts and walking wombs.
Surgeons at the University of Saskatchewan use a 3D printed human brain to plan complex neurosurgical procedures for patients with movement disorders.

3D printers: A revolutionary frontier for medicine

From cheap prosthetic arms for landmine victims in Sudan to the promise of surgery on astronauts in space — 3D printing is sparking a healthcare revolution.

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