University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 41 - 60 of 112 articles

The movie ‘Children of Men,’ based on the book of the same name by P.D. James, shows how people come together in a tragedy.

Understanding apocalyptic events through literature

The end of times, and any small-scale apocalypse, has a special quality: that of distilling what is important from what is superficial and unnecessary.
Remote presence technology enables a medic to perform an ultrasound at the scene of accident. (University of Saskatchewan)

How robots are helping doctors save lives in the Canadian North

A remote medicine program in Saskatchewan allows acutely ill children and pregnant women to be treated by specialist doctors, without leaving their communities.
Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) members stand on picket line in Halifax in October 2018 after a call for a series of rotating 24-hour strikes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ted Pritchard

Back-to-work legislation may come back to haunt Justin Trudeau

Ordering Canada's postal workers back on the job may hurt Justin Trudeau. CUPW could direct its anger directly at the Trudeau Liberals ahead of the 2019 federal election.
Morningstar Mercredi, pictured on November 16, 2018, woke up from a surgery at 14 and discovered her developing baby was gone. What remained was an incision from her panty line to her belly button, cut without her permission. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Canada’s shameful history of sterilizing Indigenous women

Recent revelations of the coerced sterilization of Indigenous women in Canada are part of a long, complex and disturbing history -- in which feminism became a fight to keep one's own children.
A Honduran migrant lies on a riverbank as Mexican police move away from tear gas fired by U.S. agents at the Mexico-U.S. border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Donald Trump’s populism preys upon collective anxieties

President Donald Trump's deployment of inflammatory rhetoric about immigration is now in action. Here's why Canadians should be alarmed by populism that preys upon people's insecurities.
Children play soccer in the small town of Baker Lake, Nunavut in 2009. Research among children with arthritis globally shows that those residing in northern latitudes have abnormally low vitamin D levels. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

Children with arthritis lack vitamin D

A new study points to a clear link between childhood arthritis and abnormally low levels of vitamin D, especially ion northern countries.
The surgical removal of wisdom teeth is far more common than the problems they cause. (Pixabay)

Bad molars? The origins of wisdom teeth

When they cause problems, wisdom teeth don't seem very smart. But they may have been evolution's answer to a coarse diet.
An old Canadian law which outlaws magic fraud is about to be eliminated. This print by William Hogarth, ‘Credulity Superstition and Fanaticism,’ from 1762 epitomizes the Enlightenment view that witchcraft and religious fanaticism go hand in hand. William Hogarth/1762

Hello magic and witchcraft, goodbye Enlightenment

An antiquated Canadian law against magic and witchcraft is about to be repealed. A close look at its history reveals that it is far less superstitious than it appears.
Steve Courtoreille, chief of the Mikisew Cree First Nation, is seen on Parliament Hill in January 2013 after speaking about legal action against the federal government. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against the First Nation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

What the Supreme Court ruling means for Indigenous consultation

The headlines suggest the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against Indigenous consultation. But its recent ruling is much more nuanced and complex than that.
A study published in the British Medical Journal Open reports that midwifery patients were 41 per cent less likely to have a small-for-gestational-age baby compared to patients of obstetricians. (Shutterstock)

Poor women who use midwives have healthier babies

New research shows that midwifery care is not just for the wealthy -- it has health and cost benefits for vulnerable women and provincial governments must act to increase their access.
The Internet of Things could improve quality of life, but it will also consume vast amounts of electricity and boost greenhouse gas emissions. (Shutterstock)

How to make computers faster and climate friendly

The Internet of Things is contributing to climate change. Innovation in computer design could help mitigate the problem.
In a research study, students with an immobilized left arm who trained their opposite wrist completely preserved both the strength and muscle volume in the left arm. (Shutterstock)

Broke your arm? Exercise the other one to strengthen it…

A research study shows that training the other limb can actually help preserve muscle in a broken and immobilized one.

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