Carleton University

Located in the nation’s capital, Carleton University is a dynamic research and teaching institution with a tradition of leading change. Its internationally recognized faculty, staff and researchers provide more than 30,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 65 programs of study, including public affairs, journalism, film studies, engineering, high technology, and international studies. Carleton’s creative, interdisciplinary and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative works in science and technology, business, governance, public policy and the arts. As an innovative institution Carleton is uniquely committed to developing solutions to real-world problems by pushing the boundaries of knowledge and understanding daily.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 81 articles

Material from the Earth’s core has been leaking into the mantle through activity that led to volcanic eruptions such as that helped form the Hawaiian islands. EPA/Bruce Omori/Paradise Helicopters

Earth’s core has been leaking for billions of years

New findings suggest the core has been leaking for the past 2.5 billion years, and that could help scientists understand how the core was formed.
United Kingdom officials suggest that messaging apps should build in law enforcement access to encrypted text, raising concerns about user privacy. Shutterstock

U.K. proposal to ‘Bcc’ law enforcement on messaging apps threatens global privacy

A recent proposal by the United Kingdom's Government Communications Headquarters agency suggests building in law enforcement access to encrypted communications. This has implications for users' digital rights and privacy.
As cannabis business takes off in Canada, many are frustrated by the new amnesty law which leaves thousands with the stigma of criminal records. Here people look at products inside Spiritleaf, the first cannabis store in Kingston, Ont., on April 1, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Canada’s new lacklustre law for cannabis amnesty

The new cannabis amnesty law, C-93 is seen as a step in the right direction, yet many feel frustrated by this bare-minimum approach.
This combination of two photographs shows Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, and the country’s main opposition Congress party President Rahul Gandhi as they address news conferences in their respective party headquarters in New Delhi last week. (AP Photos/Manish Swarup, Altaf Qadri)

Indian elections: Will India’s ‘divider in chief’ win again?

Narendra Modi looks poised to win the Indian election, even though India's long-standing economic and social problems haven’t been tackled to any great extent.
Enjoy an eclectic playlist of significant Canadian songs chosen by professors and students from Carleton University’s School for Studies in Art and Culture. Vonecia Carswell/Unsplash

Songs for your Canadian summer playlist

When you listen to music, be sure to turn your ear to its social messages. Canadian songs have a lot of important things to say.
Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda is seen in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court in 2018. (Bas Czerwinski/AP)

By not investigating the U.S. for war crimes, the International Criminal Court shows colonialism still thrives in international law

International law has deep connections to structures of power and inequality. Thankfully, committed jurists like Fatou Bensouda are fighting oppression through their unapologetic acts of resistance.
Bank swallows, like this juvenile, may become endangered unless habitat loss and other threats are reduced. Shutterstock

How birders helped pinpoint hotspots for migratory bird conservation

A collection of millions of bird sightings has identified the best places to invest in conservation.
Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government.

In Québec, Christian liberalism becomes the religious authority

The language of the neutral and secular state in Bill 21, like its precursors, presumes an invisible Christian default for the rules around public expressions of religiosity.
It turns out that sexuality research has little interest in … sex … or the pleasure associated with sex. Shutterstock

Is #MeToo casting a shadow on sexual pleasure?

How do you express, feel, communicate, and embody your sexual desires and pleasures in the prevailing social climate?
Finance Minister Bill Morneau being interviewed after delivering a budget that promised financial aid for journalism. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Government funding for journalism: To what end?

The newspaper industry has been asking the federal government for financial assistance for years. Now that Ottawa has revealed its plan, what purpose will it serve to sustain news organizations?
Women and men sitting with baby carriages in 1916 in front of The Sanger Clinic in Brooklyn, considered the first Planned Parenthood clinic. New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

Trump and Pence turning back progress on access to birth control and a woman’s right to choose

The Trump administration's proposal to block federally funded organizations from providing comprehensive reproductive health care will deprive millions of people access to sexual health services.
Ah, yes. Once again, it’s tax season. If you decide to outsource filling out your returns to someone else, be sure to ask the right questions to get the best service. Shutterstock

Dread doing your taxes? Some tips on hiring someone to take over

You need to be confident and establish a firm, trusting relationship before entrusting someone to do your taxes. Start as soon as possible. Don't wait for the April 30 tax deadline.
About 100 homes in Angus, Ont. were damaged by a tornado in June 2014. Ten lost their roofs and had to be demolished. Gregory Alan Kopp, Western University

As climate changes, the way we build homes must change too

Weather-related catastrophic events have cost Canadians more than $17 billion in the past decade. That only stands to grow, unless building codes change to make homes more resilient.

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