Carleton University

Located in the nation’s capital, Carleton University is a dynamic research and teaching institution with a tradition of leading change. Its internationally recognized faculty, staff and researchers provide more than 30,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 65 programs of study, including public affairs, journalism, film studies, engineering, high technology, and international studies. Carleton’s creative, interdisciplinary and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative works in science and technology, business, governance, public policy and the arts. As an innovative institution Carleton is uniquely committed to developing solutions to real-world problems by pushing the boundaries of knowledge and understanding daily.

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Universities face pressure to ensure their graduate programs have a clear return on investment both for students and for taxpayers. Here, the Vancouver skyline behind a Canadian flag in North Vancouver, B.C., March 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Coronavirus halted years of research and Canada needs a strategy to fight back

Graduate students are suffering, public investments in research are at risk and we need to face implications of growing reliance on international graduate students when borders are harder to cross.
Not only have people lost jobs, they have also stopped looking for work. (Shutterstock)

Here’s how the coronavirus is affecting Canada’s labour market

Younger, unmarried or less educated workers are feeling the brunt of the economic effects of COVID-19. The fallout may deepen already existing inequalities.
Canada and the United States share a border and other geographical ties. But the coronavirus has underscored the need to ease our dependence on the U.S. Niagara Falls, Ont., is seen from the American side of the falls. (Pixabay)

Coronavirus shows why Canada must reduce its dependence on the U.S.

With COVID-19 radicalizing the already radical presidency of Donald Trump, Canada may be forced to confront its dependence on the U.S. more directly and with greater urgency.
Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam and Deputy Chief Public Health Officer Howard Njoo are reflected in a computer screen showing data on Canada’s COVID-19 situation during a news conference in Ottawa, on April 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Predicting possible outcomes to coronavirus and other pandemics with models and simulations

Policy-makers at various levels of government rely on models and simulations to make predictions about controlling the spread of COVID-19.
Handguns are displayed at the Smith & Wesson booth at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Handguns account for most of the guns being purchased by first-time gun buyers in the United States during the coronavirus pandemic. AP Photo/John Locher

Why Canadians and Americans are buying guns during the coronavirus pandemic

Amid the angst over a surge in gun sales in both the United States and Canada during the pandemic, few have noted the three key differences between the two countries.
Elementary school student Adrian Zak works with his teacher online in Vienna, Austria, March 25, 2020. The Austrian government has restricted freedom of movement for people in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. AP Photo/Ronald Zak

Coronavirus isn’t the end of ‘childhood innocence,’ but an opportunity to re-think children’s rights

These are difficult and dire times, but holding on to the myth of childhood innocence won't make this crisis any easier.
Asylum seekers cross the border from New York into Canada on March 18 at Hemmingford, Que., two days before Canada said it would now send those seeking asylum back to the U.S. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Coronavirus: Racism and the long-term impacts of emergency measures in Canada

Canada has closed its borders to asylum-seekers and non-citizens because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Similar emergency measures over the years should teach us that now is not the time for nationalism.

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