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Western University

Founded in 1878, Western University in London, Ontario is one of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities, combining academic excellence with life-long opportunities for intellectual, social and cultural growth in the arts, humanities, engineering, sciences, health sciences, social sciences, business and law. With research collaborations on every continent and students and faculty trained far and wide, Western is actively engaged internationally. Western’s campus community is comprised of more than 38,000 students from 127 countries, 3,800 faculty and staff and 294,000 alumni in 154 countries. Western offers nearly 500 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in 11 faculties, a School of Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies and three affiliated university colleges. Western is proud to provide Canada’s best student experience.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 148 articles

British Columbia’s Chief Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides an update on the coronavirus pandemic on Sept. 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Even in 2020, a double standard is still applied to women in the spotlight

Women in visible leadership positions are subject to personal attacks as less competent and reliable than their male colleagues. Acknowledging this double standard is the first step in addressing it.
Un technicien de laboratoire tient un flacon d’un candidat vaccin contre la Covid-19 dans le cadre d’essais au Centre de recherche Chula sur les vaccins, administré par l’Université Chulalongkorn à Bangkok, en Thaïlande, le 25 mai 2020. AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit

Voici comment fonctionnent les essais cliniques pour les vaccins contre la Covid-19

Un vaccin contre la Covid-19 sera-t-il sûr ? Les essais sur les animaux et l’humain et la surveillance post-approbation donnent de bonnes raisons de croire qu’un vaccin approuvé sera efficace et sûr.
A lab technician holds a vial of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate during testing at the Chula Vaccine Research Center, run by Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand on May 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Explainer: How clinical trials test COVID-19 vaccines

Will a vaccine for COVID-19 be safe? Animal testing, human clinical trials and post-approval surveillance give us good grounds to believe that a future approved vaccine will work and be safe.
Personal support workers are in high demand - as this sign from Markham, ON indicates. They are an integral part of the healthcare system, but are racialized and underpaid. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Personal support workers are the backbone of health care but the bottom of the power structure

Personal support workers are crucial but under-appreciated in the health-care system. They are often subjected to racism, and they struggle to make ends meet while caring for our most vulnerable.
Facial recognition algorithms are usually tested using white faces, which results in the technology being unable to differentiate between racialized individuals. (Shutterstock)

AI technologies — like police facial recognition — discriminate against people of colour

Technology is not neutral, as facial recognition algorithms and predictive policing have shown us. Algorithms discriminate by design, reflecting and reinforcing pre-existing biases.
Police involvement is missing persons cases is often necessary. (Eric Ward/Unsplash)

What defunding the police could mean for missing persons

In the absence of serious efforts by mental health centres, shelters and youth group homes to prevent people from running away from their facilities in the first place, police involvement is necessary.
As human trials begin for potential COVID-19 vaccines, the ethics of human challenges studies must be considered. (Shutterstock)

Ethics must not be ignored when testing COVID-19 vaccines

Thousands of people around the world have said they are willing to be exposed to COVID-19 to test new vaccines. Since we don't fully understand the long-term effects of the disease, is this ethical?
La clé de la conservation à long terme des informations est de pratiquer la récupération de ces informations. Shutterstock

Trois façons de mieux étudier, selon la science

Posez votre surligneur. Les recherches sur le cerveau et la mémoire montrent qu’il est plus efficace d’apprendre en laissant du temps entre les séances d’étude et en se testant fréquemment.
The key to long-term retention of information is to practise retrieving that information. (Shutterstock)

3 ways to study better, according to cognitive research

Put down the highlighter. Research about the brain and memory shows that leaving time between study sessions and testing yourself frequently are more efficient ways to learn.
Some sports teams in the United States and Canada have finally abandoned the use of racist team names and logos. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

Applying corporate pressure to change racist team names isn’t enough

Putting pressure on corporate sponsors is a tactic that has worked when it comes to changing racist team names. But it's not enough to address systemic racism.
Implicit bias training has become a lucrative business in recent years, but it doesn’t always deliver the expected results. (Dylan Gillis/Unsplash)

Beware of bias training: Addressing systemic racism is not an easy fix

Recent years have seen a rise in the number of businesses offering employees bias training. However, bias training is not a one-size-fits-all solution and unless tailored to specific contexts loses its value.
Biology, psychology and environment can all influence a child’s sleep patterns. (Shutterstock)

10 reasons kids develop sleep problems, and how parents can help

One in four children will experience sleep problems before their 10th birthday. Here are the top factors, plus steps parents can take to give their kids (and themselves) a good night's sleep.

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