University of Alberta

The University of Alberta in Edmonton is one of Canada’s top teaching and research universities, with an international reputation for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering, and health sciences. Home to 39,000 students and 15,000 faculty and staff, the university has an annual budget of $1.84 billion and attracts nearly $450 million in sponsored research revenue. The U of A offers close to 400 rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in 18 faculties on five campuses—including one rural and one francophone campus. The university has more than 275,000 alumni worldwide. The university and its people remain dedicated to the promise made in 1908 by founding president Henry Marshall Tory that knowledge shall be used for “uplifting the whole people.”

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 31 articles

The daily fluctuations in the stock market can have a serious emotional impact on people watching their stock portfolios, when the less stressful strategy would be to pay attention to long-term trends. (Shutterstock)

Managing the highs and lows of data overload

Today it's estimated that we take in about five times as much information as we did 25 years ago, and that we process as much data in a day as our 15th century ancestors would have in their lifetime.
A Palestinian boy burns tires during Land Day protests in the West Bank city of Ramallah on March 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

Palestinian Land Day: A universal reminder of what was stolen

Like the colonization of Indigenous lands in North America and the squeezing of Indigenous peoples into "reserves," the colonization and appropriation of Palestinian land is unrelenting.
The technology and rapid pace of critical care in hospital can often erase the patient experience. Opportunities for patient storytelling can transform health care. (Shutterstock)

How patient stories can improve intensive care

When patients, doctors and nurses have the opportunity to share their experiences of hospital intensive care, the resulting dialogue can be transformative.
Members of the James Bay Cree gather around the fire as part of a week-long celebration called ‘wellness week,’ aimed at improving personal health and wellness in their community in northern Québec. (David DyckFehderau)

Indigenous group tackles diabetes with storytelling

Like many Indigenous groups around the world, the James Bay Cree of northern Québec have a disproportionately high rate of diabetes. They’re facing it down with a decidedly Indigenous solution.
YouTube has been under fire for exposing kids to harmful content. How can you keep your children safe and what are some safe viewing options? (Shutterstock)

Can you keep your kids safe watching YouTube?

YouTube has been under fire for exposing kids to harmful content and recently announced new measures but these don't go far enough. Here are some suggestions that would make a real difference.
Mubin Shaikh, a Toronto-born de-radicalization expert, speaks during a counter-terrorism event in Germany in May 2015. U.S. Army

De-radicalization can work for former ISIS fighters

No country is immune to terrorism, but de-radicalizing people who have been attracted to terrorist organizations like ISIS can work.
British Columbia Wildfire Service firefighters stand near a controlled burn to help prevent the Finlay Creek wildfire from spreading near Peachland, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

How will Canada manage its wildfires in the future?

Record-breaking wildfires made headlines around the world in 2017. Fire intensity will increase in Canada in the future with climate change, but we can invest in tools to improve the outcome.
Cory Watson of the Edmonton Eskimos reacts to losing to the Calgary Stampeders in the CFL West Final on Sunday. The word Eskimo signals negative and archaic stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Edmonton Eskimos is a racial slur and it’s time to stop using it

The use of the word Eskimos for a Canadian football team needs to end. It signals negative stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur.
A memorial for the victims of the shooting at Sutherland Springs First Baptist Church, including 25 white chairs painted with a cross and and rose, is displayed in the Texas church. A man opened fire inside the church yet his attack has not been labelled terrorism. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The debate over what constitutes terrorism

White men routinely gun down innocent victims in mass shootings in the United States. Yet they are not branded terrorists the way Muslims who commit violent acts are. Why not?
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
If the government expanded the new $73 million Student Work-Integrated Learning program to all students it could help tackle Canada’s most intractable social problems — such as homelessness, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, affordable housing, social cohesion and intercultural understanding.

Government should expand student placements into social sector

A new government program will create 10,000 work placements for undergraduates in only business and STEM subjects. Why not fund students to innovate in the social sector too?
Police investigate the scene where a car crashed into a roadblock during a suspected terrorist attack in Edmonton on Sept. 30. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

How terrorists use propaganda to recruit lone wolves

The recent Edmonton attack raises questions about a new type of terrorism and the different methods required to stop it. Labelling such attacks as the work of a "lone wolf" obscures a larger problem.
Crystal Pepsi, seen here on sale recently as part of a nostalgia campaign, was considered one of Pepsi’s epic fails. (Creative Commons)

Enabling innovation: Lessons from Crystal Pepsi

It can be much easier to develop a new product than to actually get people to try it, even for big established brands. Where did launches for products like Crystal Pepsi go wrong?
There are real consequences to ignoring children’s pain in hospital. These include increased sensitivity to pain, abnormal social behaviours when older and higher levels of anxiety before a future procedure. (Shutterstock)

Seven ways to soothe your child’s pain in the hospital

From broken limbs to blood tests, hospital visits can cause unnecessary pain for children. An emergency care pediatrician offers seven easy strategies for parents to lessen this pain.
Creating a ‘digital story’ of their memories using photos, music, text and video, can hep dementia patients open up to their fear and move into optimism. (Shutterstock)

Digital life stories spark joy in people with dementia

When dementia patients use photos and music to produce digital stories about events in their lives, they start to remember. They also face their fears about the disease, and experience happiness.
Grizzly trophy-hunting is at the heart of a ferocious debate in North America. (Shutterstock)

Fierce debate roars to life over grizzly bear hunt

A bitter debate has erupted over the British Columbia government's recent decision to end grizzly bear trophy hunting. Here are the pros and cons of stopping the hunt.
Cannabis is the most widely available and most used illegal substance in the world, and Canadian youth are among the top users. Parents and their kids need to prepare for the day it becomes legal in Canada in 2018. (Shutterstock)

Legal weed: What your kids really need to know

Parents can help protect their kids from cannabis abuse by openly discussing the health risks, the pleasures and the responsible ways to use the drug.
Tardar Sauce, la chatte de Tabatha Bundesen, désormais mieux connue sous le nom de « Grumpy Cat », a fait sensation sur Internet à cause de son expression faciale boudeuse. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Nos animaux domestiques sont-ils heureux ? Observez leur minois !

Nous pouvons facilement deviner ce que ressentent nos amis en observant leur visage. Des scientifiques parviennent, de mieux en mieux, à en faire de même avec les animaux.

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