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University of Alberta

The University of Alberta in Edmonton is one of Canada’s top teaching and research universities, with an international reputation for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering, and health sciences. Home to 39,000 students and 15,000 faculty and staff, the university has an annual budget of $1.84 billion and attracts nearly $450 million in sponsored research revenue. The U of A offers close to 400 rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in 18 faculties on five campuses—including one rural and one francophone campus. The university has more than 275,000 alumni worldwide. The university and its people remain dedicated to the promise made in 1908 by founding president Henry Marshall Tory that knowledge shall be used for “uplifting the whole people.”

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 125 articles

Why have Uber drivers been regarded more favourably than taxi drivers? Lexi Anderson/Unsplash

How Uber drivers avoided — and contributed to — the fate of taxi drivers

Taxi drivers and Uber drivers perform the same work, but Uber's categorization as a tech company has contributed to the historical stigma against taxi drivers.
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn., after being found guilty of murder in the 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Justice for George Floyd: Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdicts must result in fundamental changes to policing

The trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd reveals a broken system of policing. The guilty verdicts should be a starting point for fundamental and meaningful change.
After George Floyd’s death at the hands of police in Minneapolis, Minn., protestors all over the United States, including in Los Angeles, pictured here on May 30, 2020, demonstrated against police brutality. (Shutterstock)

The United States is at risk of an armed anti-police insurgency

The continued killings of Black people at the hands of the police in the United States has contributed to an environment of continued marginalization and oppression.
While the pandemic has caused massive upheavals, it has also forced universities to use technology to bring in much-needed change and innovations. Shutterstock

COVID-19 silver linings: Technology has helped universities be more innovative and inventive

Necessity truly can be the mother of invention. A new university president explains how the pandemic forced massive changes at his institution — and why smart use of technology was invaluable.
A child stands near a large screen showing photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping near a carpark in Kashgar in western China’s Xinjiang region. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

How to engage with China over its treatment of Uyghurs

Rights-based pressure on China over its treatment of Uyghurs is necessary, but other nations could also present best practices for the ethical treatment of racialized minorities in their own countries.
Gathering on the land: Indigenous ways of knowing can ensure that communities reclaim and promote health and healing. (Melody Morton-Ninomiya)

Indigenous community research partnerships can help address health inequities

Many researchers may lack resources to guide them in conducting research that is equitable, inclusive and respectful of diverse Indigenous knowledge, ethics, practice and research sovereignty.
A man wearing a face mask wheels his wheelchair past a spray-painted wall in downtown Vancouver in March 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Partisanship fuels what people with disabilities think about COVID-19 response

Cross-partisanship co-operation among political leaders doesn’t neatly translate into a similar consensus among the Canadian public, including those with disabilities or chronic health conditions.
Minister of Justice David Lametti gives a thumbs up as he rises to vote in favour of a motion on Bill C-7, medical assistance in dying, in the House of Commons on Dec. 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

A dangerous path: Why expanding access to medical assistance in dying keeps us up at night

Expanding access to medical assistance in dying (MAID) to those not terminally ill puts vulnerable people at risk of feeling pressured into MAID, and doctors at risk of being forced to facilitate it.
A bronze statue in Tulsa, Okla., commemorating the abuse and terrorism suffered by Black people in the city, much of it at the hands of the Ku Klux Klan. The KKK successfully overthrew a governor who tried to outlaw the organization. (Pexels)

A forgotten coup in the American heartland echoes Trump

Some downplay seemingly ridiculous white nationalist groups like the Boogaloo Boys at our peril. Looking back at a successful coup engineered by the Ku Klux Klan in Oklahoma shows us why.
People who already experience social barriers and poorer mental health status are especially vulnerable during a socially distant holiday season. (Shutterstock)

What a distanced holiday season means for people with disabilities and chronic health conditions

People in high-risk groups are already more likely to be experiencing negative mental health effects during the pandemic. Spending the holidays isolated from family and friends may make matters worse.
Exploring the unique capacities of online events, instead of trying to replicate in-person conventions, will yield the best results. (Shutterstock)

How to plan successful e-conferences during and after the COVID-19 pandemic

Academics and others concerned with benefitting from peer professional collaboration can use COVID-19 disruptions as an opportunity to improve conferences through smart design.
‘The Craft: Legacy,’ to be released this fall, is a remake of the 1996 teen witch film ‘The Craft’ and suggests the continued relevance of punk and goth influences for rebellious teens. Here, detail from the 2020 poster. (Sony Pictures/Blumhouse Productions)

Dressed to kill: 6 ways horror folklore is fashioned in the movies

Some horror films explore women’s struggles for empowerment, sexual freedom and self-fulfilment. Six movies show the ghost, bride, mother, vampiress, witch and monster as guises of vengeful women.
Alberta Minister of Health Tyler Shandro speaks during a press conference in Calgary on May 29, 2020. The Alberta government is proposing legislation to accelerate approvals of private clinics in order to get more surgeries done. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Unhealthy reforms: The dangers of Alberta’s plan to further privatize health-care delivery

Recent Alberta legislation increasing privatization in the health sector risks undermining the public health-care system, and will likely put profits over the public interest.

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