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University of Windsor

The University of Windsor is a comprehensive, student-focused university with 16,000 students enrolled in a broad range of undergraduate and graduate programs, including professional schools such as Law, Business, Science, Engineering, Education, Nursing, Human Kinetics and Social Work. The University has strong student-faculty engagement, exceptional award-winning teachers and researchers, and dedicated staff. With comparatively small class sizes and an array of student services, clubs and associations, UWindsor provides students with a friendly and supportive learning environment. The University overlooks the Detroit River on one of Canada’s most beautiful waterfronts and is minutes away from North America’s biggest international border crossing. This location speaks to UWindsor’s strength as an internationally oriented, multi-disciplinary institution that actively enables a broad diversity of students, faculty, and staff to make a better world through education, scholarship, research, and engagement.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 57 articles

Self-driving cars are programmed to identify and avoid risk, but in the case of an accident, who is legally responsible? (Shutterstock)

Who’s to blame when a self-driving car has an accident?

As self-driving cars increase in popularity, the question of legal liability remains. The driver, automobile manufacturer and software designers all have a role to play.
Ontario’s new financial literacy curriculum covers financial literacy, including budget-making, credit cards and compound interest. (Shutterstock)

6 changes in Ontario’s not-so-basic new elementary math curriculum

Ontario's new math curriculum was written by competent mathematicians relying on the latest research, and includes both coding and social-emotional learning.
Ontario’s new order in council adopting the IHRA definition on antisemitism risks stifling criticism of Israel. (Newtown grafitti/flickr)

New human rights order risks restricting criticism of Israel

Ontario's recent order-in-council adopting the IHRA's definition of antisemitism has been lauded by some. However, critics fear that it could be used to curtail criticism of the Israeli government.
The second wave of COVID-19 requires what’s known as ‘norm entrepreneurs,’ well-known and influential people who can encourage people and businesses to adhere to coronavirus containment measures. (Patrick Fore/Unsplash)

COVID-19 crackdowns: Fines are fine but bring on the ‘norm entrepreneurs’

A chorus of prominent voices that seek to persuade Canadians that COVID-19 compliance is in everyone’s interest.
A Breast Cancer Awareness sign is seen before an NFL football game between the Washington Football Team and the Baltimore Ravens on Oct. 4, 2020, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Breast cancer awareness is not enough: Public health strategies need to be based on prevention

Awareness-raising alone is an ineffective solution to the breast cancer epidemic. We need more action on primary prevention to limit exposures to known and suspected breast carcinogens.
Malala Yousafzai, an honorary Canadian citizen and a UN Messenger of Peace, speaks as she sits with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in his office during her visit to Parliament Hill for her Honorary Canadian Citizenship ceremony in April 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada is starting to answer the call on UN Sustainable Development Goals

Even amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada is pursuing its international policy on the UN's Sustainable Development Goals and scoring points on the world stage by leading the global support for recovery.
Some nurses who live in Windsor, Ont. work at hospitals in Detroit, just across the Ambassador Bridge. (Shutterstock)

Heroes, or just doing our job? The impact of COVID-19 on registered nurses in a border city

Nurses on both sides of the border report that they aren't getting the support they need to feel safe on the job and maintain their own health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.
A British think tank says Canada’s legalization of cannabis has largely been a success story. But we still have work to do. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

The verdict: Canada’s legalization of cannabis is a success

The British think tank Transform has given Canada high marks for its cannabis legalization efforts. But it also delved into areas that still need work, including social equity issues like amnesty.
An RCMP officer looks on as supporters of the Wet'suwet'en Nation block a road outside of RCMP headquarters in Surrey, B.C., in January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Provincial governments are setting the stage for more violence against Indigenous Peoples and their lands

The passage of laws in Alberta and Saskatchewan granting police greater powers and weapons are seen as a direct attempt to stifle protests by Indigenous Peoples.
A young man in Ontario (not pictured) affiliated with incel culture has been charged with terrorism, which may pose problems for how we understand national security. (Shutterstock)

Why charging incels with terrorism may make matters worse

The decision to charge an incel youth with terrorism reinforces worrying trends in counterterrorism.
Women may delay leaving an abusive partner if they co-own a pet. (Pexels)

People in abusive relationships face many barriers to leaving — pets should not be one

Canada must consider funding programs that allow abuse victims and survivors to bring their pets with them when they leave their partners.

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