Simon Fraser University

As Canada’s engaged university, SFU is defined by its dynamic integration of innovative education, cutting-edge research and far-reaching community engagement. SFU was founded more than 50 years ago with a mission to be a different kind of university—to bring an interdisciplinary approach to learning, embrace bold initiatives, and engage with communities near and far. Today, SFU is Canada’s leading comprehensive research university and is ranked one of the top universities in the world. With campuses in British Columbia’s three largest cities – Vancouver, Burnaby and Surrey – SFU has eight faculties, delivers almost 150 programs to over 35,000 students, and boasts more than 150,000 alumni in 130 countries around the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 40 articles

Many people are turned away by abusive language on online news sites but new research reveals that only 15 per cent of comments are “nasty.” (Shutterstock)

Online news trolls not as bad as we think

Are online trolls as bad as we think? New research reveals that most online news comments contribute positively to the conversation.
Research shows that just 10 minutes of meditation per day can increase business students’ physical, mental and emotional awareness. (Shutterstock)

The many benefits of meditation in the classroom

Classroom meditation shows promise for improving student attention, focus, happiness and self-awareness.
Research shows that regular exercise can dramatically reduce the risks of depression as well as boost cognition and memory. (Shutterstock)

How exercise can boost your brain function

From opioids to endocannabinoids, an exercise scholar digs into the science to explain the mental health benefits of a regular workout.
Organized labour held demonstrations in front of Tim Hortons franchises in Ontario in January 2018 to protest the actions some Tim Hortons franchises have taken in response to an increase in the province’s minimum wage. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

The issues facing Canadian workers this May Day

May Day is a time to reflect on labour struggles of the past and demands for the future, and Canada's move toward increasing the minimum wage is not enough. Labour politics is about who counts
After a diagnosis of HIV, some women see themselves as blameworthy, contaminated or contagious, because of societal discourses of risk and stigma. (Unsplash/Allan Fillipe Santos Dias

Why a fulfilling sexual life with HIV matters

On International Women's Day, everyone can pledge to be an ally to women living with HIV and support their access to sexual health and sexual pleasure.
Governments in countries such as Mexico and the United Kingdom have responded to the over-consumption of refined sugar with a “sugar tax;” Canada lags behind. (Unsplash/Neven Krcmarek)

Just how bad is all that sugar for your heart?

Too much refined sugar in your diet is not just a risk factor for obesity and diabetes, it also increases your chances of heart disease.
A team of researchers in northern Australia have documented kites and falcons, “firehawks,” intentionally carrying burning sticks to spread fire: It is just one example of western science catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. James Padolsey/Unsplash

It’s taken thousands of years, but Western science is finally catching up to Traditional Knowledge

A double standard exists concerning the acceptance of Traditional Knowledge by practitioners of Western science.
Women are referred less than men for in-hospital treatments such as angioplasty, performed here at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York in 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Why heart disease is often missed in women: The myth of the ‘widowmaker’

Heart disease is the number one cause of death for women globally. And yet women's symptoms and risk factors are less well recognized, and they receive less in-hospital care, than men.
The presence of sidewalks, green space, healthy food outlets, and trustworthy neighbours can all play a part in minimizing your risks of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

How your community impacts the health of your heart

As 'Heart Month' kicks off across North America, a cardiovascular researcher explains how the neighbourhood you live in can affect your risks of heart disease.
Do not be derailed by news reports that exercise is bad for the heart. Taking more exercise is a New Year’s resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death. (Shutterstock)

Exercise more in 2018 – it really is good for your heart

Taking more exercise is a New Year's resolution to stick to. Exercise reduces risks of depression, cancers, heart disease, stroke and sudden death.
Incentives are one way to get more people to buy electric cars. (Pixabay)

How to get more electric vehicles on the road

Despite the hype around electric vehicles, sales in most nations, including Canada, remain stagnant. Policy support in California and Norway have helped boost sales.
Individuals wearing virtual reality headsets often look isolated. But research shows they can experience profound emotions such as awe, which enhance their feelings of social connection and wellbeing. (Shutterstock)

Inspired, magical, connected: How virtual reality can make you well

Research shows that virtual reality experiences can help social disconnection and improve wellness - by inspiring awe.
Model Adriana Lima walks the stage in “Nomadic Adventure” lingerie “inspired by indigenous African cultures,” at the Victoria’s Secret fashion show in Shanghai on Nov. 20. (Handout)

Victoria’s Secret does it again: Cultural appropriation

At Victoria's Secret recent fashion show on Nov. 20, models strutted down the runway wearing Native-inspired regalia. There is no excuse for this socially irresponsible behaviour.
Two young Brazilian men at a carnival street party in Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro wearing traditional Indigenous feathers. (Shutterstock)

A guide: Think before you appropriate

Taking a practical and pragmatic approach by posing a series of questions to consider, this summary of the IPinCH guide unpacks important questions about cultural appropriation.
Why has B.C. become home to Canada’s most vibrant news ecosystem? Credit the wellspring of creativity here — the province’s beauty and potential has long attracted change-makers. (Shutterstock)

A good news story about the news in British Columbia

A good news story about the news? It's true. In British Columbia, a digital news ecology is flowering through ‘coopetition’ – as Media Democracy Day will soon showcase.
An intricate crop circle spans a diameter of more than 45 metres in a barley field close to Barbury Castle near Wroughton, England, about 130 kilometres west of London, in 2008. The circle is noteworthy for its complexity, representing the first 10 digits of the mathematical constant pi, or 3.141592654. Lucy Pringle

Crop circles blur science, paranormal in X-Files culture

Crop circles are global phenomena gaining attention as paranormal culture becomes mainstream, along with a hybrid approach that emulates scientific investigation.
Research calls for global regulation of dental tourism - to prevent poor working conditions for local populations serving a wealth North American elite. (Shutterstock)

Dental tourism industry exploits workers in Mexico

Thousands of North Americans travel to Mexico to eat, drink, shop and get cheap and fast dental care. Meanwhile, local populations suffer racism, poor working conditions and inadequate health care.

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