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Brian Reed, host of S-Town, somewhere in the woods of Bibb County, Alabama. Andrea Morales

Why S-Town invites empathy not voyeurism

The podcast S-Town has been both rapturously reviewed and described as 'morally indefensible' for its intrusion into the life of a mentally ill man. But it validates, rather than violates, a fierce, flawed life.
Ebonnie Masini and Rian McLean in Round the Twist (1989), one of Australia’s most fondly remembered children’s TV dramas. Australian Children's Television Foundation

The slow death of Australian children’s TV drama

TV networks must produce new local children's TV drama each year - but they are increasingly making animation, with little sense of place. We need shows that will reflect kids' lives back to them.
Part of Charles Blackman’s The Exchange, 1952, oil on plywood on composition board. 91.7 x 91.7 cm National Gallery of Victoria © Charles Blackman

The schoolgirls of Charles Blackman – haunting works from a politically innocent age

Today, the idea of a male artist making a major series of paintings about schoolgirls, or any sort of children, sits uncomfortably with the public. But these were memorable and original works when painted in the 1950s.
If Australia adopted a similar approach to the Hong Kong to eliminate debt loading abuse, United States oil and gas giant Chevron would have been denied A$6.275 billion in interest deductions. Ray Strange/AAP

Chevron is just the start: modelling shows how many billions in revenue the government is missing out on

New modelling shows governments need to ensure that corporations benefiting from the use of Australia's resources, are contributing the same as they do in other jurisdictions.
Western Australia’s largest private solar array covers the roof of this food distribution centre in Perth’s south. AAP Image/Bidvest

Five things the east coast can learn from WA about energy

Despite its name, the National Electricity Market doesn't reach WA. But those charged with guiding the eastern states' energy transition should look west once in a while.
A detail from Vincent Van Gogh’s, Olive grove with two olive pickers, December 1889 Saint-Rémy, oil on canvas 73.3 x 92.2 cm. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo © Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands

Here’s looking at: Vincent Van Gogh’s Olive grove with two olive pickers

The pickers and sinewy olives in this painting all strain upward towards the hope of spiritual salvation. But six months after he completed it, Vincent Van Gogh walked out into a wheat field and shot himself.
The truth is we don’t really know if space goes on forever – but maybe, one day, we will find out. Sweetie187/flickr

Curious Kids: Does space go on forever?

People used to think that when they looked up at the night sky, they were seeing all of space. Then American astronomer Edwin Hubble found out something so amazing, NASA named a telescope after him.
Part of a black cotton cushion cover depicting the Australian coat of arms embroidered by Lance Corporal Alfred Briggs (Albert Biggs), 20 Battalion, AIF. Courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Stitching lives back together: men’s rehabilitation embroidery in WWI

Embroidery - often seen as women's work - was a common form of therapy for troops wounded in the first world war. One soldier, Albert Biggs, learned to sew with his left hand after his right arm was badly injured.