Home – Articles, Analysis, Comment

Displaying 1 - 25 of 25044 articles

When the H3N2 strain dominates, we see bigger flu seasons and cases affecting the elderly more than the young. from shutterstock.com

This may not be the ‘biggest flu season on record’, but it is a big one – here are some possible reasons

By mid-August, the 2017 year had recorded more flu notifications across Australia than the previous five years. So why is the flu season so bad this time around?
Unless we design research programs to look at why people would rather stay on country than receive effective health treatments, Aboriginal health may not improve. Dan Peled/AAP

Controlled experiments won’t tell us which Indigenous health programs are working

Like all good health care, improving health in remote settings requires an evidence base. But forcing all research questions into the randomised controlled trial model is not the answer.
Joan of Arc depicted on horseback in an illustration from a 1505 manuscript. Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: Joan of Arc, our one true superhero

Forget Wonder Woman and Batman. The Maid of Orléans - an uneducated, teenage girl who led armies to victory - is a hero for our times.
Adelaide’s aims in becoming a smart city include better traffic flows and highly co-ordinated transport networks. moisseyev/iStock by Getty Images

Lessons from Adelaide in how a smart city can work to benefit everyone

Smart city thinking makes good use of rapidly developing technology to help make cities work better, easier-to-navigate, safer, healthier and more enjoyable places to live.
New York residents protest against AirBnB at a City Hall hearing into the impact of short-term rentals in 2015. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Speaking with: Nicole Gurran on Airbnb and its impact on cities

Dallas Rogers speaks with Nicole Gurran about the rise of AirBnb and what the limited data publicly available can tell us about how it's blurring the line between residential property and tourism.
Phone manufacturers, like the Dutch company Fairphone, require suppliers of raw materials used in their phones to improve employment conditions for their workers. Mike Hutchings/Reuters

What businesses can do to stamp out slavery in their supply chains

Businesses can use their purchasing power to change the actions of their suppliers and help to eradicate slavery - both in Australia and across the world.
The Robert E. Lee statue for which the ‘Unite the Right’ rally was organized to protest its removal in Charlottesville, Virginia. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

From Charlottesville to Nazi Germany, sometimes monuments have to fall

The violence sparked by the removal of Confederate statues in the US shows the ideas that collect around historical monuments. Sometimes it's better to remove them; yet they can be an important way of remembering trauma.
The decision reveals the striking breadth of the government’s power to deal with asylum seekers and refugees in ways that directly contravene international law. AAP/Eoin Blackwell

High Court challenge to offshore immigration detention power fails

The Australian government had and has the power to do things necessary to establish and maintain its immigration detention facility on Manus Island, despite detention violating PNG law.
The Peutinger Table. Reproduction by Conradi Millieri - Ulrich Harsch Bibliotheca Augustana. Wikimedia Commons

Mythbusting Ancient Rome – did all roads actually lead there?

Today the phrase 'all roads leads to Rome' means that there's more than one way to reach the same goal. But in Ancient Rome, all roads really did lead to the eternal city, which was at the centre of a vast road network.
The relationship between drivers and cyclists is highly unequal, both physically and culturally. Photographee.eu from www.shutterstock.com

Cars, bicycles and the fatal myth of equal reciprocity

The primacy given to the car has shaped our cities, the roads that serve them and our very thinking about the place of driving in our lives. And it's a mindset that leaves cyclists highly vulnerable.