In the Fir Tree, children stamp on a discarded – but feeling – Christmas tree. The Fir Tree, illustrated by George Dalziel and Edward Dalziel, from Out of the Heart: Spoken to the Little Ones, 1867

Cli-fi

How 19th century fairy tales expressed anxieties about ecological devastation

The Industrial Revolution choked English cities in smog, filled rivers with waste and spread disease in crowded cities. At the same time, fairy tales about humans destroying nature proliferated.
Performers protesting the Brandis decision outside the Sydney Opera House in 2015. Paul Miller/AAP

Arts policy

After the Catalyst arts funding mess, many questions remain

The arts sector lobbied hard against the Catalyst funding model, which the ALP had labelled 'a ministerial slush fund'. But will the money returned to the Australia Council go to those who need it?
Print magazines are as popular as ever – but why? Shutterstock

Publishing

From pig hunting to quilting – why magazines still matter

Newspapers may be in crisis but magazines are thriving. The growth is in specialist titles - indeed the glossy offerings of Coles and Woolworths now have almost double the readership of the Australian Women's Weekly,
Gumtree Brutalism: the Eddie Koiki Mabo Library (1968), designed by Queensland architect James Birrell, on the James Cook University campus.

Architecture

Brutalism, a campus love story – or how I learned to love concrete

Academics are often in the vanguard of the fight to preserve heritage buildings but they are losing the battle on home turf as universities shed their 1960s and 1970s concrete skins.
Clementine Ford: one of the younger voices more visible now in mainstream media. Allen and Unwin/AAP

Culture

Young people, the media and Gangland 20 years on

It is 20 years since author Mark Davis wrote his influential book Gangland exploring the domination of baby boomers in public life. Is it time for a fresh exploration of 'generationalism' today?
(Eternal Sunshine of Spotless Mind) says to me…true love is still possible and you can put your faith in it.

Close Up

The great movie scenes: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Bruce Isaacs analyses the deceptively complex closing scene of Charlie Kaufman’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), starring Jim Carey and Kate Winslet.

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