Menu Close

Articles on History

Displaying 1 - 20 of 1075 articles

‘That physicians in the Anti-Vaccine Society (England, early 19th C) were concerned that Jenner’s smallpox inoculation gave people bovine-like features.’ – historian’s tweet in reply to author asking about memorable finds. Twitter/Wellcome

I asked historians what find made them go ‘wait, wut?’ Here’s a taste of the hundreds of replies

Historians, archivists and other researchers got in touch with tales of their archival finds and bizarre research moments. These ranged from the quirky to the disturbing to the profound.
The expansion of railways meant more people could travel around the country for seaside getaways. Gordon Samson/Alamy

How the Victorians invented the ‘staycation’

Expanding railways and changes in labour practices meant that the Victorians had time for a proper holiday and many took to the British coast.
Poster showing ‘The Leader of the Luddites’ (1812) Wikimedia Commons

I’m a Luddite. You should be one too

Why a workers’ rebellion in 19th-century England is relevant in the age of data extraction, gig labour and management by algorithm.
A man hangs a protest banner where the Egerton Ryerson statue used to sit at Ryerson University. The statue was toppled in June by those protesting the discovery of graves at Indian Residential Schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Suburban monumentalism: How do we change Indigenous-settler relations when there are no statues to destroy?

The suburban-built environment whitewashes the violence and theft on which Canada is built.

Top contributors

More