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Articles on Schrödinger's cat

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By adding a ‘digital roll’ to its iconic game, Tim Hortons’ Roll up the Rim contest now has some statistical similarities to slot machines. (Photo Illustration/The Conversation)

Roll up the Rim: How COVID-19 has changed the contest — and maybe your odds of winning

The Tim Hortons coffee chain has made some changes to its iconic Roll up the Rim contest, including the addition of "digital rolls." A statistician explains how this changes the odds of winning.
The crests (bright) and troughs (dark) of waves spread out after they were produced. The picture applies to both light and sound waves. Titima Ongkantong

A new type of laser uses sound waves to help to detect weak forces

Most people are familiar with lasers. But what about a laser made with sound rather than light? A couple of physicists have now created one that they plan to use for measuring imperceivable forces.
A silica sphere with a radius of 50 nanometers is trapped levitating in a beam of light. J. Adam Fenster, University of Rochester

Experiments with optical tweezers race to test the laws of quantum mechanics

The discovery and development of optical tweezers won the 2018 Nobel Prize in physics. Now physicists are using this tool to crack some of the fundamental questions behind how the universe works.
What’s the link between technology and consciousness? AlexLMX/Shutterstock.com

Will artificial intelligence become conscious?

Researchers' views depend in part on what technology is (or will be) capable of – and in part on what consciousness actually is.
If kitty goes in, will she really be alive and dead? Robert Couse-Baker/Flickr

Schrödinger’s cat gets a reality check

It’s a century-old debate: what is the meaning of the wave function, the central object of quantum mechanics? Is Schrödinger’s cat really dead and alive? I was recently involved in an experiment conducted…

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