Articles on US Senate

Displaying 1 - 20 of 222 articles

US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on October 8, 2019. She accused the White House of an “unlawful attempt to hide the facts” after it ruled out cooperating with an impeachment probe of President Donald Trump. Andrew Caballero/AFP

Trump and Nixon: Three key differences between 2019 and 1974

The impeachment investigation of US president Donald Trump has formally started, but much has changed since 1974, when Richard Nixon was forced out of office.
Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell, the senate majority leader, has a lot of power. AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

If impeachment comes to the Senate – 5 questions answered

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is known as a master of Senate rules. If the House impeaches President Trump, what could he do to influence the process – and outcome – of a trial?
Crash or crash through? Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Prime Minister Scott Morrison walk to a meeting with the Reserve Bank governor on Wednesday. Joel Carrett/AAP

Frydenberg declares tax package must be passed ‘in its entirety’

In an interview with The Conversation, Frydenberg refused to be drawn on what the government would do if unable to get the whole bill through.
Scott Morrison has been returned as prime minister, but we don’t yet know if the Coalition will get to the 77 seats it needs to form majority government (minus the speaker). AAP/Joel Carrett

Majority or minority Coalition government? Here’s what happens now

We now wait for the final count of seats in the House of Representatives and the Senate - and in the meantime, government continues.
Given a stable but not spectacular primary vote, the Greens, led by Richard di Natale (centre), seem likely to retain their presence in parliament. AAP/Penny Stephens

Greens on track for stability, rather than growth, this election

The Greens' fortunes have fed off Labor's performance: a weakened Labor means more support for the Greens. But this election the party is more likely to maintain its parliamentary presence.
GOP President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O'Neill at the April, 1983 signing of bipartisan social security legislation. AP/Barry Thumma

Congress used to pass bipartisan legislation – will it ever again?

Most Congresses since the 1970s have passed more than 500 laws, ranging from nuclear disarmament to deficit reduction. Will today's bitter partisanship hamstring the new Congress' productivity?

Top contributors

More